It is currently 19 Sep 2017, 13:52

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

m15 # 27

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Feb 2009
Posts: 17

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 1

m15 # 27 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Aug 2009, 09:15
Set S is composed of consecutive multiples of 3. Set T is composed of consecutive multiples of 6. If each set contains more than one element, is the median of set S larger than the median of set T?

s1) The least element in either set is 6.
s2) Set T contains twice as many elements as set S.
(C) 2008 GMAT Club - m15#27

Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but Statement (2) ALONE is not sufficient
Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but Statement (1) ALONE is not sufficient
BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient
EACH statement ALONE is sufficient
Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient
Statement (1) by itself is insufficient. If set contains many more elements than set , its median can be greater than that of set .

Statement (2) by itself is insufficient. We don't know how the sets are positioned against each other.

Statements (1) and (2) combined are sufficient. The answer is "no".

The correct answer is C.

my question is...cant this still be proved ineffective?
it says consecutive multiples of 3 or 6, but you cannot just assume they start with small elements
to TEST C:
eg. S= (3,6,9,12,15,18) median = 10.5, T = (6,12,18) median = 12
median S < median T = therefore NO

BUT there is no restriction on where these consecutive multiples start:
what if S = (102,105,108, 111, 114, 117) median = 109.5 , T = (6, 12, 18) median = 12

so shouldnt the answer be E?

am i missing something here? thanks in advance..

Last edited by viperm5 on 08 Aug 2009, 16:18, edited 1 time in total.

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 1

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Jul 2009
Posts: 164

Kudos [?]: 114 [0], given: 8

Re: m15 # 27 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Aug 2009, 09:24
Please post the exact question i.e. mention the set names in the following statements:
"is the median of set larger than the median of set"
"Set contains twice as many elements as set "

Kudos [?]: 114 [0], given: 8

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Feb 2009
Posts: 17

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 1

Re: m15 # 27 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Aug 2009, 16:18
Aleehsgonji wrote:
Please post the exact question i.e. mention the set names in the following statements:
"is the median of set larger than the median of set"
"Set contains twice as many elements as set "



ooops sorry didnt realize i missed those. thanks!! fixed.

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 1

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Jul 2009
Posts: 164

Kudos [?]: 114 [0], given: 8

Re: m15 # 27 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Aug 2009, 19:53
Each statement alone is insufficient.
Combining 1 and 2
Both the sets S & T start with 6.
From 2, number of elements in T is twice as the number of elements in S.
S = {6,9,12}
T = {6,12,18,24, 30,36}
Median of S = 9
Median of T = 21
1 and 2 are sufficient. Answer is C.
Though median of S is less than median of T, we are able to arrive at this answer using both the statements.
In data sufficiency, we should not look for Yes or No answer but we should for arriving at the solution.

Kudos [?]: 114 [0], given: 8

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Feb 2009
Posts: 17

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 1

Re: m15 # 27 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Aug 2009, 12:19
Aleehsgonji wrote:
Each statement alone is insufficient.
Combining 1 and 2
Both the sets S & T start with 6.
From 2, number of elements in T is twice as the number of elements in S.
S = {6,9,12}
T = {6,12,18,24, 30,36}
Median of S = 9
Median of T = 21
1 and 2 are sufficient. Answer is C.
Though median of S is less than median of T, we are able to arrive at this answer using both the statements.
In data sufficiency, we should not look for Yes or No answer but we should for arriving at the solution.


ahh makes sense now.
thanks for clarification!! :)

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 1

Re: m15 # 27   [#permalink] 09 Aug 2009, 12:19
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
DS:m 15 #29 pmal04 1 23 Jun 2009, 20:23
4 EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC m15,#10 ritula 18 31 Dec 2011, 05:27
13 EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC M15#18 snowy2009 22 06 Jul 2014, 11:29
6 EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC M15 #3 snowy2009 26 20 Apr 2014, 08:21
M15 Q 27 - DS klb15 4 22 Jul 2009, 04:34
Display posts from previous: Sort by

m15 # 27

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderator: Bunuel



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.