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Made it to Schulich - my story

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Made it to Schulich - my story  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2019, 21:21
1
Finally I got a chance to write something here :) :

It has indeed been a long journey for me, which started with taking the GMAT in 2016, in the chilly days in India right after demonetization, to applying to business school, getting rejected, and finally making it to some good options. I know way too many people post their long stories, but I will try to keep it short and sweet, in the hope that I can help the tremendous community members here learn from the key experiences and lessons I got.

Background: I have 7+ years of experience in the high-technology space. Male/Indian engineer. ECA not outstanding, but not zero either. Some good experiences at work, and some good awards as well. Decent international exposure but no foreign experience.

GMAT: This was not my only attempt on the test, but the best I could manage was 670. I was ensure on whether I should take it again, and I spent some time just thinking about that. What did I learn? Dedicate yourself either to getting a better score, or focus on the next steps. Don't spend too much time in between the two decisions. Had I decided that 670 was my best score, and I should proceed, at that time itself, I could have saved literally one year. Also, I found that preparing on one's own schedule, through books and online resources, was better than attending classes, as my work is demanding, and I often needed to put in late nights. This can vary for other people, but creating a schedule and sticking to it certainly helped me.

App planning: I faltered on this front early on. The first year (2016) I dithered on when I should apply, and I found that by the time I did, it was too late. My suggestion to others is that you should list out your target schools (more on this later) and their deadlines, and then work backwards towards where you stand to see what needs to be done when. I made this mistake by postponing things to a point where I found I had too little time to apply in late 2016/early 2017.

By 2017, I had this aspect sorted out, but made a different mistake - not selecting the right schools, and not researching the ones I should apply to. I applied on the basis of average GMAT scores, and though I was clear about what I wanted to do after an MBA, my expression in my applications (in hindsight) was not clear. Maybe this applies to other people who come from technology backgrounds too. Thinking that one's work will speak for itself may not be the best approach. Ensuring that the essays do have the clarity that schools are looking for is important. Result in 2017 - no interviews, but plenty of learning. Another year gone by.

In 2018, I decided to do things differently. I started early (July/August), and planned my work and commitments much better. I also decided to work with an admissions consultant and this helped me structure the process better. It may work differently for different people, but I found that having a sounding board, having someone else also monitoring the process, and discussing my ideas and plans with an expert really helped. In addition, I spoke to several alumni and current students of my target schools. I didn't apply to too many schools this time - just two - but they were the right ones. This was an important lesson for me - it is important to target the right schools than find safety in numbers.

Final results: I made it to Schulich (with $$) and ESSEC (also with $$). I have decided to join ESSEC Global MBA program. A big thanks to GyanOne and to those who have read my post so far. My advice - don't give up, plan well, and know that if you keep working towards your goals, you will get there; if not in one year, then the next (and if not in even that, then certainly in the third, as I did!).


Thanks :)
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Re: Made it to Schulich - my story  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Feb 2019, 01:07
ABMVD wrote:
Finally I got a chance to write something here :) :

It has indeed been a long journey for me, which started with taking the GMAT in 2016, in the chilly days in India right after demonetization, to applying to business school, getting rejected, and finally making it to some good options. I know way too many people post their long stories, but I will try to keep it short and sweet, in the hope that I can help the tremendous community members here learn from the key experiences and lessons I got.

Background: I have 7+ years of experience in the high-technology space. Male/Indian engineer. ECA not outstanding, but not zero either. Some good experiences at work, and some good awards as well. Decent international exposure but no foreign experience.

GMAT: This was not my only attempt on the test, but the best I could manage was 670. I was ensure on whether I should take it again, and I spent some time just thinking about that. What did I learn? Dedicate yourself either to getting a better score, or focus on the next steps. Don't spend too much time in between the two decisions. Had I decided that 670 was my best score, and I should proceed, at that time itself, I could have saved literally one year. Also, I found that preparing on one's own schedule, through books and online resources, was better than attending classes, as my work is demanding, and I often needed to put in late nights. This can vary for other people, but creating a schedule and sticking to it certainly helped me.

App planning: I faltered on this front early on. The first year (2016) I dithered on when I should apply, and I found that by the time I did, it was too late. My suggestion to others is that you should list out your target schools (more on this later) and their deadlines, and then work backwards towards where you stand to see what needs to be done when. I made this mistake by postponing things to a point where I found I had too little time to apply in late 2016/early 2017.

By 2017, I had this aspect sorted out, but made a different mistake - not selecting the right schools, and not researching the ones I should apply to. I applied on the basis of average GMAT scores, and though I was clear about what I wanted to do after an MBA, my expression in my applications (in hindsight) was not clear. Maybe this applies to other people who come from technology backgrounds too. Thinking that one's work will speak for itself may not be the best approach. Ensuring that the essays do have the clarity that schools are looking for is important. Result in 2017 - no interviews, but plenty of learning. Another year gone by.

In 2018, I decided to do things differently. I started early (July/August), and planned my work and commitments much better. I also decided to work with an admissions consultant (GyanOne - they were really good in helping me select the right schools and helping me execute my applications flawlessly) and this helped me structure the process better. It may work differently for different people, but I found that having a sounding board, having someone else also monitoring the process, and discussing my ideas and plans with an expert really helped. In addition, I spoke to several alumni and current students of my target schools. I didn't apply to too many schools this time - just two - but they were the right ones. This was an important lesson for me - it is important to target the right schools than find safety in numbers.

Final results: I made it to Schulich (with $$) and ESSEC (also with $$). I have decided to join ESSEC Global MBA program. A big thanks to GyanOne and to those who have read my post so far. My advice - don't give up, plan well, and know that if you keep working towards your goals, you will get there; if not in one year, then the next (and if not in even that, then certainly in the third, as I did!).


Thanks :)


Congratulations on making it and thanks for sharing your journey.

Can you please also share:-

1. In your second attempt, did you apply to same schools that you applied to in your first attempt?

2. You applied with the same gmat score and same work profile after getting rejected first year. What significant changes have you made in your profile in this 1 year apart from consulting an expert? This would help guys who got rejected this year and wish to apply next year again with the same gmat score.

Regards
Sandysilva

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Joined: 17 Jun 2013
Posts: 26
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Re: Made it to Schulich - my story  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2019, 03:56
sandysilva wrote:
ABMVD wrote:
Finally I got a chance to write something here :) :

It has indeed been a long journey for me, which started with taking the GMAT in 2016, in the chilly days in India right after demonetization, to applying to business school, getting rejected, and finally making it to some good options. I know way too many people post their long stories, but I will try to keep it short and sweet, in the hope that I can help the tremendous community members here learn from the key experiences and lessons I got.

Background: I have 7+ years of experience in the high-technology space. Male/Indian engineer. ECA not outstanding, but not zero either. Some good experiences at work, and some good awards as well. Decent international exposure but no foreign experience.

GMAT: This was not my only attempt on the test, but the best I could manage was 670. I was ensure on whether I should take it again, and I spent some time just thinking about that. What did I learn? Dedicate yourself either to getting a better score, or focus on the next steps. Don't spend too much time in between the two decisions. Had I decided that 670 was my best score, and I should proceed, at that time itself, I could have saved literally one year. Also, I found that preparing on one's own schedule, through books and online resources, was better than attending classes, as my work is demanding, and I often needed to put in late nights. This can vary for other people, but creating a schedule and sticking to it certainly helped me.

App planning: I faltered on this front early on. The first year (2016) I dithered on when I should apply, and I found that by the time I did, it was too late. My suggestion to others is that you should list out your target schools (more on this later) and their deadlines, and then work backwards towards where you stand to see what needs to be done when. I made this mistake by postponing things to a point where I found I had too little time to apply in late 2016/early 2017.

By 2017, I had this aspect sorted out, but made a different mistake - not selecting the right schools, and not researching the ones I should apply to. I applied on the basis of average GMAT scores, and though I was clear about what I wanted to do after an MBA, my expression in my applications (in hindsight) was not clear. Maybe this applies to other people who come from technology backgrounds too. Thinking that one's work will speak for itself may not be the best approach. Ensuring that the essays do have the clarity that schools are looking for is important. Result in 2017 - no interviews, but plenty of learning. Another year gone by.

In 2018, I decided to do things differently. I started early (July/August), and planned my work and commitments much better. I also decided to work with an admissions consultant (GyanOne - they were really good in helping me select the right schools and helping me execute my applications flawlessly) and this helped me structure the process better. It may work differently for different people, but I found that having a sounding board, having someone else also monitoring the process, and discussing my ideas and plans with an expert really helped. In addition, I spoke to several alumni and current students of my target schools. I didn't apply to too many schools this time - just two - but they were the right ones. This was an important lesson for me - it is important to target the right schools than find safety in numbers.

Final results: I made it to Schulich (with $$) and ESSEC (also with $$). I have decided to join ESSEC Global MBA program. A big thanks to GyanOne and to those who have read my post so far. My advice - don't give up, plan well, and know that if you keep working towards your goals, you will get there; if not in one year, then the next (and if not in even that, then certainly in the third, as I did!).


Thanks :)


Congratulations on making it and thanks for sharing your journey.

Can you please also share:-

1. In your second attempt, did you apply to same schools that you applied to in your first attempt?

2. You applied with the same gmat score and same work profile after getting rejected first year. What significant changes have you made in your profile in this 1 year apart from consulting an expert? This would help guys who got rejected this year and wish to apply next year again with the same gmat score.

Regards
Sandysilva

Posted from my mobile device



Sure,

1. Mostly new schools but few same as they showed interest.

2. Yes, I applied with the same GMAT score and similar work profile. However, I got some solid awards, good leadership opportunities, and much more international exposure. Please note that all these didn't happen in a year's time frame. The continuous effort of couple of years helped to have resulted in these. My advice to others is to focus on other aspects if they want to apply with the same GMAT score and apply to the right schools.

Thanks.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Made it to Schulich - my story   [#permalink] 02 Feb 2019, 03:56
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