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Many Kitchens today are equipped

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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2016, 13:18
sayantanc2k wrote:
nycgirl212 wrote:
For this question, I chose B. I was deciding b/w B and E, but thought that E was lacking a "that are" after the 'processors'. Why was "that are" not required?


The latter part of the following post explains your query:
many-kitchens-today-are-equipped-212344.html#p1636552


"However, from concision aspect, option E is better than option A (or B). I shall try to compare with a simpler example:

Option I: using a clause:I love football, which is the national game of Madland.
Option II: using a phrase: I love football, the national game of Madland.
"


In option II, is "the national game of Madland" a modifying phrase modifying "football"?

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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2016, 14:13
nycgirl212 wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
nycgirl212 wrote:
For this question, I chose B. I was deciding b/w B and E, but thought that E was lacking a "that are" after the 'processors'. Why was "that are" not required?


The latter part of the following post explains your query:
many-kitchens-today-are-equipped-212344.html#p1636552


"However, from concision aspect, option E is better than option A (or B). I shall try to compare with a simpler example:

Option I: using a clause:I love football, which is the national game of Madland.
Option II: using a phrase: I love football, the national game of Madland.
"


In option II, is "the national game of Madland" a modifying phrase modifying "football"?


Yes, in option II, the modifier is called an appositive - a noun (or noun phrase) used to modify another noun.

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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2016, 11:07
naumyuk wrote:
naumyuk wrote:
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those



Here is official GMAC explanation:
The point of this sentence is the claim that common kitchen appliances can be as dangerous as an industrial wood-planing machine. It makes this point by comparing the injuries (plural) caused by blenders and food processors with those (also plural) caused by the wood-planing machine. An efficient way to make this comparison is to use the idiom capable of, an adjective phrase rather than a relative clause, after blenders and food processors.


B - compares says the appliances can cause serious injuries (which are similar to the injuries caused by ...)
E - Compares the seriousness of the injuries.

the intended meaning, which can be dedudced from the original sentence, is to compare the seriousness of the injuries, and hence E is correct.

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Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2017, 08:38
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

Issue: Comparison

Analysis:
1. In this sentence we want to make sure that similar entities are being compared in the underlined clause i.e. injuries are compared with injuries

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
- Redundant

(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
- "such as" changes the meaning of the sentence from what is originally intended.

(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
- Incorrect comparison

(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
- Incorrect idiom "capable to.."

(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those

Answer: (E)

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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 01:19
Hi Experts,

I just wanted to clarify the comparison expression "As X As" in this question. If we have an expression: "As much X as Y", we make sure that X and Y are parallel elements that are being compared. Can you explain the usage of "As X As" expression for comparison? What 2 elements does it compare? Thanks a ton!
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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 01:37
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yt770 wrote:
Hi Experts,

I just wanted to clarify the comparison expression "As X As" in this question. If we have an expression: "As much X as Y", we make sure that X and Y are parallel elements that are being compared. Can you explain the usage of "As X As" expression for comparison? What 2 elements does it compare? Thanks a ton!


The parallel elements are "injuries" and "those".
"injuries" (inflicted by kitchen equipment) is compared with "those" (= injuries - cause by wood planing machines).

(In your structure "as X as", X is not an element of comparison: X = serious, an adjective - the structure here is "X as [adjective] as Y".)

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yt770, injuries are being compared to other injuries: "injuries as serious as those [injuries] caused by an industrial wood-planing machine."

In the form "as X as Y," X and Y are not the parallel elements. Rather, Y is parallel with whatever precedes the idiom. So if I say "this dog is as big as a cow," I am comparing the dog and the cow. In between, I've showed the trait that they have in common (being big). Similarly, in the original example, we are saying that injuries from kitchen gadgets and those (injuries) from wood-planning machines can be equally serious.
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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 12:29
DmitryFarber sayantanc2k

Thanks a lot! It's clear now.
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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2017, 00:06
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those

(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
--> the intended meaning is to give comparison, not examples.

(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been

(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that

(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those
--> correct.
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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2017, 07:11
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those


Intended meaning: kitchens - equipped - gadgets - inflict injuries as those caused by an industrial machine

Grammar: GMAT uses "which" for non-essential clause -->> we can remove which clause to test that sentence is ok or not.
>>> A & B is wrong.

C & D: "that" is wrong
>>> E is correct.

Additional errors:
B: such as >>> GMAC uses GMAT to provide example.
D: "capable to" is wrong; correct idiom: capable of
C: having been

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 22:26
Although 'E' is the correct choice. I got this wrong and confused between choices 'A' and 'E'.

A - uses incorrect idiomatic expression 'as serious injuries as those' - Eliminate
E - uses 'as serious as those' - correct usage of idiom - Correct.
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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 07:42
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
change in meaning : gadgets themselves are able to inflict injuries.
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
'Such as' used to introduce examples : Incorrect
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
',verb -ing' modifier modifies entire preceding clause.
use of "having been" is wrong
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
'that' works as pronoun here. antecedent of 'that'(singular) is injuries(plural)
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those
correct.

experts pls comment.

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Re: Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 04:51
Answer choice 'E' is correct - Correct idiom usage "capable of".
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Many Kitchens today are equipped [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 08:09
naumyuk wrote:
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those


The answer is E

here the comparison is between the seriousness of the injuries caused by high-speed electrical gadgets and injuries caused by industrial wood-planing machine.


A distorts the meaning also are able to is wordy .
B there is a shift in meaning here the sentence is giving example of the injury .But we have compare .
C there is a change in meaning as in this they are already causing injury and having been is wrong
D capable to is wrong idiom
E correct idiom and meaning is also clear

Hi experts
Is the use of which correct in A and B ?
It is referring to high-speed electrical gadgets because "such as blenders and food processors" is in between two commas .
Is my reasoning correct ?

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