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Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets

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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2016, 13:18
sayantanc2k wrote:
nycgirl212 wrote:
For this question, I chose B. I was deciding b/w B and E, but thought that E was lacking a "that are" after the 'processors'. Why was "that are" not required?


The latter part of the following post explains your query:
many-kitchens-today-are-equipped-212344.html#p1636552


"However, from concision aspect, option E is better than option A (or B). I shall try to compare with a simpler example:

Option I: using a clause:I love football, which is the national game of Madland.
Option II: using a phrase: I love football, the national game of Madland.
"


In option II, is "the national game of Madland" a modifying phrase modifying "football"?
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2016, 14:13
nycgirl212 wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
nycgirl212 wrote:
For this question, I chose B. I was deciding b/w B and E, but thought that E was lacking a "that are" after the 'processors'. Why was "that are" not required?


The latter part of the following post explains your query:
many-kitchens-today-are-equipped-212344.html#p1636552


"However, from concision aspect, option E is better than option A (or B). I shall try to compare with a simpler example:

Option I: using a clause:I love football, which is the national game of Madland.
Option II: using a phrase: I love football, the national game of Madland.
"


In option II, is "the national game of Madland" a modifying phrase modifying "football"?


Yes, in option II, the modifier is called an appositive - a noun (or noun phrase) used to modify another noun.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2016, 11:07
naumyuk wrote:
naumyuk wrote:
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those



Here is official GMAC explanation:
The point of this sentence is the claim that common kitchen appliances can be as dangerous as an industrial wood-planing machine. It makes this point by comparing the injuries (plural) caused by blenders and food processors with those (also plural) caused by the wood-planing machine. An efficient way to make this comparison is to use the idiom capable of, an adjective phrase rather than a relative clause, after blenders and food processors.


B - compares says the appliances can cause serious injuries (which are similar to the injuries caused by ...)
E - Compares the seriousness of the injuries.

the intended meaning, which can be dedudced from the original sentence, is to compare the seriousness of the injuries, and hence E is correct.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2017, 08:38
2
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

Issue: Comparison

Analysis:
1. In this sentence we want to make sure that similar entities are being compared in the underlined clause i.e. injuries are compared with injuries

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
- Redundant

(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
- "such as" changes the meaning of the sentence from what is originally intended.

(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
- Incorrect comparison

(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
- Incorrect idiom "capable to.."

(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those

Answer: (E)
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 01:19
Hi Experts,

I just wanted to clarify the comparison expression "As X As" in this question. If we have an expression: "As much X as Y", we make sure that X and Y are parallel elements that are being compared. Can you explain the usage of "As X As" expression for comparison? What 2 elements does it compare? Thanks a ton!
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 01:37
1
yt770 wrote:
Hi Experts,

I just wanted to clarify the comparison expression "As X As" in this question. If we have an expression: "As much X as Y", we make sure that X and Y are parallel elements that are being compared. Can you explain the usage of "As X As" expression for comparison? What 2 elements does it compare? Thanks a ton!


The parallel elements are "injuries" and "those".
"injuries" (inflicted by kitchen equipment) is compared with "those" (= injuries - cause by wood planing machines).

(In your structure "as X as", X is not an element of comparison: X = serious, an adjective - the structure here is "X as [adjective] as Y".)
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 01:45
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1
yt770, injuries are being compared to other injuries: "injuries as serious as those [injuries] caused by an industrial wood-planing machine."

In the form "as X as Y," X and Y are not the parallel elements. Rather, Y is parallel with whatever precedes the idiom. So if I say "this dog is as big as a cow," I am comparing the dog and the cow. In between, I've showed the trait that they have in common (being big). Similarly, in the original example, we are saying that injuries from kitchen gadgets and those (injuries) from wood-planning machines can be equally serious.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 12:29
DmitryFarber sayantanc2k

Thanks a lot! It's clear now.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2017, 00:06
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those

(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
--> the intended meaning is to give comparison, not examples.

(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been

(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that

(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those
--> correct.
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2017, 07:11
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those


Intended meaning: kitchens - equipped - gadgets - inflict injuries as those caused by an industrial machine

Grammar: GMAT uses "which" for non-essential clause -->> we can remove which clause to test that sentence is ok or not.
>>> A & B is wrong.

C & D: "that" is wrong
>>> E is correct.

Additional errors:
B: such as >>> GMAC uses GMAT to provide example.
D: "capable to" is wrong; correct idiom: capable of
C: having been
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 22:26
Although 'E' is the correct choice. I got this wrong and confused between choices 'A' and 'E'.

A - uses incorrect idiomatic expression 'as serious injuries as those' - Eliminate
E - uses 'as serious as those' - correct usage of idiom - Correct.
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New post 16 Aug 2017, 07:42
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Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
change in meaning : gadgets themselves are able to inflict injuries.
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
'Such as' used to introduce examples : Incorrect
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
',verb -ing' modifier modifies entire preceding clause.
use of "having been" is wrong
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
'that' works as pronoun here. antecedent of 'that'(singular) is injuries(plural)
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those
correct.

experts pls comment.
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New post 21 Aug 2017, 04:51
Answer choice 'E' is correct - Correct idiom usage "capable of".
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 08:09
naumyuk wrote:
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those


The answer is E

here the comparison is between the seriousness of the injuries caused by high-speed electrical gadgets and injuries caused by industrial wood-planing machine.


A distorts the meaning also are able to is wordy .
B there is a shift in meaning here the sentence is giving example of the injury .But we have compare .
C there is a change in meaning as in this they are already causing injury and having been is wrong
D capable to is wrong idiom
E correct idiom and meaning is also clear

Hi experts
Is the use of which correct in A and B ?
It is referring to high-speed electrical gadgets because "such as blenders and food processors" is in between two commas .
Is my reasoning correct ?

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New post 20 Oct 2017, 12:50
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those - as serious injuries - awkward phrase + coupled with 'caused by..machine' - injuries cannot be equated to machines
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as thoseincorrect idiom - 'injuries as' - required
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been'having been' -? - incorrect tense - past perfect means that the said equipment is still causing injury
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as thatcapable of, not 'to'
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those 'capable of' + 'as serious as'
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2017, 23:00
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naumyuk wrote:
Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.

(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those
(C) inflicting injuries as serious as that having been
(D) capable to inflict injuries as serious as that
(E) capable of inflicting injuries as serious as those


A- "as serious as" is incorrect it is saying the gadgets able to inflict "as serious injuries".. compare "inflict damage" to "inflict as serious injuries"... it's not a good comparison. Eliminate
B- 'such as those' is used to provide examples of injury types. This answer choice really doesn't fit without adding a comma between injuries and such. Verb Tense is also incorrect 'having been' does not fit with past tense already established by 'equipped'..Eliminate
C- 'gadets...inflicting' implies they are designed to inflict..thats their job..'inflicting...' Eliminate.
D- capable to.... incorrect idiom. Capable of

E - Correct use of idiom 'capable of' plus 'as serious as' is correct comparison. Lock it in
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2017, 05:52
Hi friends,

I understood why other choices are incorrect & why E is correct, however I am keen to know the following:
How to differentiate the use of "ability" & "capability" in sentence structure?
Will "machines have the ability to inflict serious injuries" & "machines are capable of inflicting serious injuries" mean the same?
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2017, 07:18
1
63. Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets, such as
blenders and food processors, which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
caused by an industrial wood-planing machine.
(A) which are able to inflict as serious injuries as those
(B) which can inflict serious injuries such as those


I have a doubt here..... why is "such as" actually wrong?

Lets take an example :-
which can inflict serious injuries such as a deep gash

Now a deep gash could very well be an injury caused by an industrial wood planting machine ..........

what am i missing here ?? please help ???
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2018, 11:43
I don't think blenders or food processors can cause any harm to you if you use them a little bit care and simply follow the instructions manual provided by the company along with the product and don't put those products which are not recommended by manufactures. I found this site helpful in purchasing the best food processor for my kitchen. http://choosefoodprocessor.com/the-best-food-processor/
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Re: Many kitchens today are equipped with high-speed electrical gadgets  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2018, 19:11
Hi Experts!

I have a few questions in choice A.

1) I think some of the official questions uses "Noun" after the first "as" in 'as X as Y' construction and I believe that's okay. It's not a requirement to have an adjective or adverb for 'X' in 'as X as Y' construction. But in this question, the meaning would change because "as serious injuries as those caused by..." here we are saying that the gadgets will cause the same number of serious injuries as the number of injuries caused by industrial machine. The focus in this question is NOT on comparing the number of serious injuries but the "seriousness" of the injuries. Is my understanding correct here?

2) Can you tell me why "able to" is wrong here?

Thank you very much!

GMATNinja, sayantanc2k
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