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Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witne

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Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witne  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2019, 22:35
3
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A
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C
D
E

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Question Stats:

36% (01:37) correct 64% (01:44) wrong based on 176 sessions

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Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witness, is a sacrifice that leads to both dignity of the life and consecration of the death, comes at the cost of one’s life.

(A) leads to both dignity of the life and consecration of the death, comes

(B) dignifies both the life and consecration of death, comes

(C) dignifies the life, consecrates the death, and comes

(D) both dignifies the life and consecrates the death; it comes

(E) both dignifies the life and consecrates the death, comes
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Re: Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witne  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2019, 04:09
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generis

What is the issue with Option C. I ostracized option D,which has "IT" in it, with no antecedent.

Can you please help!
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Re: Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witne  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2019, 06:34
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shridhar786 wrote:
Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witness, is a sacrifice that leads to both dignity of the life and consecration of the death, comes at the cost of one’s life.

(A) leads to both dignity of the life and consecration of the death, comes

(B) dignifies both the life and consecration of death, comes

(C) dignifies the life, consecrates the death, and comes

(D) both dignifies the life and consecrates the death; it comes

(E) both dignifies the life and consecrates the death, comes



IMO the author wants to explain "Martyrdom" by highlighting that "dignifies the life" & "consecrates the death", plus the author wants to highlight that "it comes at the cost of one’s life".

"Dignifies the life" and "consecrates the death" are part of a single thought or parts of the same coin. So these two have to be expressed as a single thought.

A: ", comes at the cost of one’s life": This modifier is modifying "consecration of death" but as per the meaning of sentence, it should modify "Martyrdom"

B: Same as A. The last modifier is modifying the wrong phrase. Also "both the life" and consecration of death" are not parallel to each other

C: The 3 thoughts: "dignifies the life, consecrates the death, and comes at the cost of" should not be parallel to each other. In terms of structure also, the 1st two are noun phrases and the 3rd one is adverbial phrase

D: Correct answer. "both dignifies the life and consecrates the death" are parallel to each other and the last part "; it comes at cost of one's life" presents the last important information as an independent clause

E: Same error as A & B. ", comes at the cost of one’s life": This modifier is modifying "consecration of death" but as per the meaning of sentence, it should modify "Martyrdom"
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Re: Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witne  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2019, 07:43
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Shivan21

Thanks for your response!

I am still not sure, how did you identify that "dignifies the life" & "consecrates the death" are part of the same thought.

Would you be able to throw some light on this?

Posted from my mobile device
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Re: Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witne  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2019, 07:59
nehasomani33 wrote:
Shivan21

Thanks for your response!

I am still not sure, how did you identify that "dignifies the life" & "consecrates the death" are part of the same thought.

Would you be able to throw some light on this?

Posted from my mobile device



nehasomani33
Hello Neha. I am not an expert, but since the sentence is speaking about life and death, it seems they are part of one single thought. Also the other options kind of convey the same idea. But to be honest, I was equally confused about C option.

Hope this helps. Thanks.

Hope this helps.
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Re: Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witne  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Nov 2019, 03:20
Could you please explain the choices C and D? Thanks in advance :)
From my understanding,
I think the subject of 'comes' in choice C is sacrifice. In choice D 'it' refers to the subject of the previous clause Martyrdom and Martyrdom acts as subject as this clause.

But, I don't understand meaning-wise what should be the subject of the verb comes.
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Re: Martyrdom, a word with its root in the Greek martur, which means witne   [#permalink] 09 Nov 2019, 03:20
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