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Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the

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Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2008, 20:32
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GMAT® Official Guide 2016

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 117
Page: 696

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

(A) excepting for
(B) except in
(C) but except in
(D) but excepting for
(E) with the exception of

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English World-wide - Volumes 18-19 - Page 65

https://books.google.com.my/books?id=gMpAAQAAIAAJ
1997 - ‎Snippet view - ‎More editions
THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN MAURITIUS: PAST AND PRESENT PETER STEIN Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on ...
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2010, 12:26
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The OA is C on this one. B is a run-on sentence. If you start the clause with "except," it's independent, so you should've had a period or semicolon.

If you start the sentence with "with," it's a run-on sentence again. See how you've started another independent clause, thus not "E"

-t
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2008, 21:59
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The sentence includes two independent clauses, so a conjuntion should be used to connect two clauses. A, B, E out

"excepting" in D modifies "the English language" --> awkward

C is the winner
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 10:43
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Paras237 wrote:
Except can also be used as a conjunction.
It implies but and except are redundant. So why B is incorrect?



Hello Paras237,

I will be glad to help you out with one. :-)


When two words having the same meaning is used in a sentence to convey an idea, redundancy error takes place. For example,


1. He annually participates in a marathon every year.

2. Although she is good in English literature, but she could not score well in the exam.

In both the above-mentioned sentence, we spot redundancy error because annually and every year in sentence 1 and although and but in sentence 2 mean the same and present the same idea.


However, in the context of this official sentence, use of but and except together does not lead to redundancy error because both these words have been used to present two different contrasts as follows.

Contrast 1 = Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but the English language was never really spoken on the island.

Contrast 2 = Except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

As you can see, while but presents the contrast with regards to English not being spoken in Mauritius despite it being a British colony for two centuries, use of except tells us that in which areas the language was used.

Remove any of the word from the sentence and you will see that the sentence misses something.

Also, comma + but is required in the sentence to join the two independent clauses -

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years
the English language was never really spoken on the island.



Hope this helps. :-)
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2014, 02:51
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snowbirdskier wrote:
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island. (GMAT practice test from mba.com)

A - excepting for
B - except in
C - but except in
D - but excepting for
E - with the exception of



two independent sentence has to be connect by comma +fanboys.. Hence A , B , E out.

out of C & D - except in the domain looks good compared to excepting for the domain.

Answer :C
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2014, 12:13
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snowbirdskier wrote:
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island. (GMAT practice test from mba.com)

A - excepting for
B - except in
C - but except in
D - but excepting for
E - with the exception of


Understanding intent of meaning helps solve this question. They are trying to say that English was only spoken in two domains and nowhere else. So they want to CONTRAST this, therefore we need a "but".

That's why C is correct and E is wrong.
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 13 Sep 2016, 20:14
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Answer is C
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years is the independent clause
the English language was never really spoken on the island is the second dependent clause.


Now there are two decision points here to select the correct answer.
1) First, we need a FANBOYS conjunction to connect the first and second clauses
2) Second, as the Sentence tells us about a fact that is unusual and unexpected. Therefore it should must have - a Conjuctions that represents contrast)

Which conjunction is used to show contrast :- "BUT"

ONLY C and D are candidates among the given options

D is out because of the wrong words- the gerund "ing" excepting instead of the correct form except

C is the correct answer

snowbirdskier wrote:
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island. (GMAT practice test from mba.com)

A - excepting for
B - except in
C - but except in
D - but excepting for
E - with the exception of

OG16 SC117

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Originally posted by LogicGuru1 on 08 Jul 2016, 23:41.
Last edited by LogicGuru1 on 13 Sep 2016, 20:14, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2017, 11:21
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Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

A - excepting for - Run on sentence
B - except in - Run on sentence
C - but except in - Correct - conjunction(FANBOYS) needed to join to two independent clauses
D - but excepting for - excepting for is unidiomatic
E - with the exception of - Run on sentence

Answer C
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2017, 05:43
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rishabhmishra wrote:
thanks bro but after , but dr is no subject and verb if its independent clause dr must be one then it will became clause

Hi rishabhmishra,

before the but:

i) Subject: Mauritius
ii) Verb: was


after the but:

i) Subject: the English language
ii) Verb: was

Also, it may be useful to note that presence/absence of a verb/subject does not differentiate an independent clause from a dependent clause. Both these types of clauses (independent and dependent) have a subject and a verb.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses types of clauses, their application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2017, 14:10
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anandch1994 wrote:
egmat and mikemcgarry
Can you please help me splitting up the sentences into clauses. According to the og solution the two clauses here are
1) Mauritius was a British.......200 years
2) expecting...island
Why cant i split it into two clauses this way:
1)Mauritius was...teaching ( being the first clause)
2)the english....island




Hello anandch1994,

Thank you for the query. I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Let's take a good look at the sentence:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching,

the English language was never really spoken on the island
.


(subjects = blue, verbs = green)

As you can see, the sentence has above-mentioned two clauses. Both the clauses are Independent clauses (ICs) as the phrase excepting for... just acts as a modifier for the second IC. These two ICs are connected by just a comma. This structure is not correct as two ICs need comma + FANBOYS or a semicolon or a dash in between for grammatical connection.

On the basis of this connection in the sentence, we can eliminate Choice A, B, and E.

Now between Choice C and D, C is the correct answer as it uses the correct idiom except in.



Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2019, 13:01
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Smitc007 wrote:
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

"Administration" is a noun & "Teaching" here is acting like a activity so, it's a gerund
Noun and Gerund


Is there no mistake of parallelism here ?
egmat AjiteshArun


Hello Smitc007!

In this sentence, both "administration" and "teaching" are referring to two different career fields - and it's okay that they're worded differently. Teaching is not considered an action verb here - it's how we refer to the career field that teachers work in. If this was your own writing, and you wanted to make it sound more parallel, you could certainly change "teaching" to "education," but the meaning there is a little less clear. Education encompasses a lot more than just teachers and their work, so "teaching" is the clearer term here.

When it comes to how we refer to career fields, they have a variety of endings:

Accounting / Construction / Management / Writing / Communication / Logistics

I hope this helps!
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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Sanjeetgujrall wrote:
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one issue at a time, and narrow it down to the right choice! It's a pretty short sentence, so this should be a quick one to answer! To start, here is the original question with the major differences between the options highlighted in orange:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

(A) excepting for
(B) except in
(C) but except in
(D) but excepting for
(E) with the exception of

Okay, to be honest, you could highlight everything in each option because they're short and all different. However, if you look at the entire sentence, carefully, a major clue should jump out at you:

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

We have two INDEPENDENT CLAUSES in here with a phrase separating them. Whenever we have two independent clauses in a sentence, what do we need to have to connect them? A conjunction or a semicolon!

Let's take a look at each sentence with the non-underlined parts worked back in. Make sure that there is some way to separate the two independent clauses that is grammatically correct (a conjunction or semicolon):

(A) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT because there is no conjunction to connect the two independent clauses together. It's actually a run-on sentence with a modifier in between to throw you off! A modifier is not good enough to separate two independent clauses - it MUST be a conjunction or semicolon.

(B) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is also INCORRECT because it doesn't have a conjunction to connect our two independent clauses! A modifier in between them isn't good enough!

(C) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is CORRECT! It uses the coordinating conjunction "but" to combine the two independent clauses together to create one complete sentence.

(D) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT. While it does use the conjunction "but" to combine the two clauses, we have an idiom problem. The phrase "excepting for" is not an acceptable idiom in English. "Except in" or "with the exception of" are the correct forms of this idiom.

(E) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, with the exception of the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

This is INCORRECT because it doesn't use a conjunction to connect the two independent clauses. It's one long run-on sentence with a modifier in between, which isn't good enough to work.


There you have it - option C is the correct choice! It's the only one that uses a conjunction to connect two independent clauses together AND doesn't have any idiom issues.


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Hi,

I have a doubt. I get the whole reasoning why A and B are run-on sentences but I am just confused about option C.

In the main sentence except in the domains of administration and teaching acts as a modifier

But in option C what do the below highlighted parts act as?

except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island - Do they act as 1 independent clause or is the first part still a modifier ? how can teaching, the engish language......... make sense?


Hello Sanjeetgujrall!

Thank you for your question. Let's take a look at option C to break down each part's function:

(C) Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years = INDEPENDENT CLAUSE
except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island. = INDEPENDENT CLAUSE
but = COORDINATING CONJUNCTION (what we use to connect 2 independent clauses together)

The phrase "except in the domains of administration and teaching" is still a modifier here - it's modifying "the English language." This would still be the case if you split these 2 independent clauses into 2 separate sentences. We just needed to make sure that there was a conjunction to join the 2 independent clauses together, otherwise the modifier sounds confusing and unclear. Here is how the options break down:

Options A, B, & E are run-on sentences because there is no conjunction joining the 2 independent clauses together.
Option D uses a conjunction, but the phrase "excepting for" isn't idiomatically correct, so we rule that out.
This leaves us with option C - the only one that uses the right idiom and a conjunction.

I hope this helps!
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2017, 11:28
rishabhmishra wrote:
TommyWallach wrote:
The OA is C on this one (I don't know who said differently). B is a run-on sentence. If you start the clause with "except," it's independent, so you should've had a period or semicolon.

-t

but according to my knowledge independent clause must have subject and verb and i am unable to find subject and verb in this sentence
please help me


Hi rishabhmishra ,
The subject and verb in the two independent clauses have been color coded .


Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

Hope this helps!! :)
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2017, 05:35
thanks bro but after , but dr is no subject and verb if its independent clause dr must be one then it will became clause
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New post 02 Aug 2017, 05:23
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Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

A - excepting for ==> usage of "excepting" is incorrect, also, instead of "for" the it should have "in" - Furthermore, this is a run on sentence as it is not connected with the help of a FANBOY connector

B - except in ==> Missing the FANBOY connector, ideally a connector that can describe a contrast between two sentences. "but" will be appropriate usage here.

C - but except in ==> CORRECT - Usage of FANBOY correctly connects two independent clauses, and usage of "in" is also correct.

D - but excepting for ==> usage of "excepting for" is incorrect

E - with the exception of ==>Run on sentence as the sentence is not connected with the help of a FANBOY connector. And usage of "with the exception of" is also incorrect.

Hence, Answer is C
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 07:03
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carcass wrote:
really really tough answer :(

First of all I saw the list of all idioms on this board in excel format and I didn't find it.

Secondly i have searched on different site and nothing

Yet, i have found this

Use Except Correctly:

Use except as a preposition to mean excluding or but. "Everyone went to the party except Jonathan."

Use as a conjunction to mean only, or with the exception, often followed by the word "that." "The twins are identical except that one has longer hair than the other."

Use as an idiom to mean "if it weren't for" something. "Sandra would go back to college except for lack of time and money."

Use as a verb to mean to exclude or leave out, or to object. "Let's except that item from the list."

I picked B for POE (not so far away, indeed)...........


Except can also be used as a conjunction.
It implies but and except are redundant. So why B is incorrect?
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2017, 10:36
snowbirdskier wrote:
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

(A) excepting for
(B) except in
(C) but except in
(D) but excepting for
(E) with the exception of

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Sentence Analysis
The sentence says that Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years. As we read further, we see that there is some exception we’re talking about. The sentence says “excepting for the domains of administration and teaching”. First, “excepting for” is idiomatically incorrect. We don’t use ‘for’ with ‘excepting’. (However, we do use ‘for’ with ‘except’). Second, this exception doesn’t seem to apply to what we have read so far; probably it’ll apply to the latter part of the sentence.

The sentence then says “the English language was never really spoken on the island”. As we read this part, we observe two things:

The exception presented earlier applies to this part of the sentence. The exception means that English was probably spoken in the domains of administration and teaching. Now, having understood the context of this exception, we see that we need ‘in’ as the preposition, not ‘for’, as given in “excepting for”. This part is an independent clause in itself. Thus, we have two independent clauses joined by a comma. We have a punctuation error here.

Option Analysis
(A) Incorrect. For the errors described above.

(B) Incorrect. For the punctuation error: Two independent clauses are joined by a comma.

(C) Correct. The two independent clauses are now correctly joined by comma + but.

(D) Incorrect. As we discussed in the sentence analysis, “excepting for” is incorrect. Besides, we need the preposition “in” in the sentence.

(E) Incorrect. For the below reasons:

Two independent clauses joined by a comma.
“with the exception of” distorts the meaning. Now, it is not clear to which aspect it is presenting an exception.
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Nov 2017, 08:48
@egmat and @mikemcgarry
Can you please help me splitting up the sentences into clauses. According to the og solution the two clauses here are
1) Mauritius was a British.......200 years
2) expecting...island
Why cant i split it into two clauses this way:
1)Mauritius was...teaching ( being the first clause)
2)the english....island
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2017, 08:17
anandch1994 wrote:
egmat and mikemcgarry
Can you please help me splitting up the sentences into clauses. According to the og solution the two clauses here are
1) Mauritius was a British.......200 years
2) expecting...island
Why cant i split it into two clauses this way:
1)Mauritius was...teaching ( being the first clause)
2)the english....island


In that case you would be creating a run-on sentence, i.e. two independent clauses separated only by a comma (without a conjunction).
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New post 06 Mar 2018, 00:23
Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years,excepting for the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.

A. excepting for

B. except in

C. but except in

D. but excepting for

E. with the exception of


In this question
I read previous posts and based on my intuition
I can eliminate A, B, E and finally D.
However, I feel uncomfortable, since some grammatical enigma I can't untangle.

I checked dictionaries and I now know the word 'except' can become preposition, conjunction and verb.
Moreover, there is the word 'excepting' as a preposition.

Question 1
Given that except can be conjunction and it's meaning is 'not including'
Why (B) 'except in' is wrong? It can be alternative choice of 'but'?
because but is used to introduce an added statement, usually something that is different from what you have said before ??

Question 2
I have a question about this comma '","the English language was never really spoken'
From OA bellow, there's a conjunction 'but' so I don't know the function of this comma.
Can I omit this comma?

Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years,but except in the domains of administration and teaching, the English language was never really spoken on the island.
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Re: Mauritius was a British colony for almost 200 years, excepting for the   [#permalink] 06 Mar 2018, 00:23

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