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Microscopic plants called algae grow inside the top

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Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of sea ice in the Antartic if enough sunlight reaches that layer of ice and enough seawater, which contains nutrients, reaches that layer after splashing onto the surface. Even though moderate snow cover reduces the sunlight that filters into the top layer, sea ice with moderate snow cover typically contains even more algea in the top layer than does sea ice with less snow cover.

Which of the following , if true most helps to explain the apparent discrepancy?

As the weight of accumulated snow forces ice lower in the water, more seawater splashes onto the surface and seeps through the snow.

Seawater in the Antartic often contains higher concentrations of nutrients than does seawater in more temperate regions,

As the air temperature around sea ice decreases during the winter, the likelihood decreases that snow will fall and thus add to any existing snow cover.

The nutrients on which algae rely are common in seawater throughout the Antartic

More sunlight filters through a layer of ice than through an equally thick layer of snow.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2008, 21:37
A for me.

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2008, 22:29
alimad wrote:
Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of sea ice in the Antartic if enough sunlight reaches that layer of ice and enough seawater, which contains nutrients, reaches that layer after splashing onto the surface. Even though moderate snow cover reduces the sunlight that filters into the top layer, sea ice with moderate snow cover typically contains even more algea in the top layer than does sea ice with less snow cover.

Which of the following , if true most helps to explain the apparent discrepancy?

As the weight of accumulated snow forces ice lower in the water, more seawater splashes onto the surface and seeps through the snow.

Seawater in the Antartic often contains higher concentrations of nutrients than does seawater in more temperate regions,

As the air temperature around sea ice decreases during the winter, the likelihood decreases that snow will fall and thus add to any existing snow cover.

The nutrients on which algae rely are common in seawater throughout the Antartic

More sunlight filters through a layer of ice than through an equally thick layer of snow.



I think A is the only logical answer here, as only this option opens up the logical possibility of higher algae growth even under a high snow cover
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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2008, 22:35
yeap.Only A seems logical here.

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2008, 04:42
also went with A ...

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2010, 11:15
OA is E. This is a GMAC teaser.

The growth of algae in the uppermost layer of Antarctic sea ice depends on accessibility to sunlight and nutrient-bearing seawater that percolates downward from the surface. The amount of sunlight penetrating the ice is limited by snow cover—yet the top layer of sea ice under moderate snow cover contains more algae than sea ice under less snow cover. Why does this occur?

According to the last choice, the more snow cover, the lower the ice sinks in the water—which allows more seawater to percolate down through the ice (this presumably can also allow sunlight to penetrate at certain times). This seems a reasonable explanation, and better than the other choices given.

The first choice compares the nutritional value of Antarctic seawater with that of other seawater, but this is irrelevant to explaining the puzzle presented.

The second choice describes a process by which snow accumulation might slow down or stop—but does not help us understand how algae under moderate snow cover have acquired both enough nutrition and enough sunlight.

Clearly neither the third nor the fourth choice is any better in this respect than the second choice.
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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2010, 19:11
Unfortunately, I still did not get why E needs to be the answer.
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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2010, 09:34
ykaiim wrote:
OA is E. This is a GMAC teaser.

The growth of algae in the uppermost layer of Antarctic sea ice depends on accessibility to sunlight and nutrient-bearing seawater that percolates downward from the surface. The amount of sunlight penetrating the ice is limited by snow cover—yet the top layer of sea ice under moderate snow cover contains more algae than sea ice under less snow cover. Why does this occur?

According to the last choice, the more snow cover, the lower the ice sinks in the water—which allows more seawater to percolate down through the ice (this presumably can also allow sunlight to penetrate at certain times). This seems a reasonable explanation, and better than the other choices given.

The first choice compares the nutritional value of Antarctic seawater with that of other seawater, but this is irrelevant to explaining the puzzle presented.

The second choice describes a process by which snow accumulation might slow down or stop—but does not help us understand how algae under moderate snow cover have acquired both enough nutrition and enough sunlight.

Clearly neither the third nor the fourth choice is any better in this respect than the second choice.



explanation does not match the option given.
first choice does not compare the nutrinal value.

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2010, 16:34
A for me.

I still dont undertstand how E can be the correct answer.

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2010, 01:59
the whole thing is a paradox. The only explanation is: choice A is supposed to be in position of choice E. Just look at ykaiim's explanation! obviously it is the correct answer.

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2010, 02:24
I THINK A SHLD BE ANS

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2013, 12:33
the paradox involves "Sunlight". Between A and E, only E talks about it.

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2013, 18:55
I agree with the answer E. This is my explanation:
Expected:
Moderate snow cover leads to presumed decrease in sunlight and thus leads to decrease in algae.

Actual:
Moderate snow cover leads to increase in algae.
Therefore the answer must show that the amount of sunlight reached the moderate snow has not decrease.

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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ykaiim wrote:
OA is E. This is a GMAC teaser.

The growth of algae in the uppermost layer of Antarctic sea ice depends on accessibility to sunlight and nutrient-bearing seawater that percolates downward from the surface. The amount of sunlight penetrating the ice is limited by snow cover—yet the top layer of sea ice under moderate snow cover contains more algae than sea ice under less snow cover. Why does this occur?

According to the last choice, the more snow cover, the lower the ice sinks in the water—which allows more seawater to percolate down through the ice (this presumably can also allow sunlight to penetrate at certain times). This seems a reasonable explanation, and better than the other choices given.

The first choice compares the nutritional value of Antarctic seawater with that of other seawater, but this is irrelevant to explaining the puzzle presented.

The second choice describes a process by which snow accumulation might slow down or stop—but does not help us understand how algae under moderate snow cover have acquired both enough nutrition and enough sunlight.

Clearly neither the third nor the fourth choice is any better in this respect than the second choice.



Hi all. I'd like to confirm OA is A.
You can see the illogical reasoning in "OA" of ykaiim. Please see the BLUE part. What it says is exactly a paraphrased version of A, NOT E.
What A says:
(A) As the weight of accumulated snow forces ice lower in the water, more seawater splashes onto the surface and seeps through the snow.

Also, refer to the first sentence of the stimulus:
Microscopic plants called algae grow inside the top layer of sea ice in the Antarctic if enough sunlight reaches that layer of ice and enough seawater, which contains nutrients, reaches that layer after splashing onto the surface.
Two conditions for algae growth:
(1) enough sunlight
(2) enough seawater


A says exactly the second condition. Thus, A is correct.

Probably, ykaiim missed the order of option choices. (I assume in his question, A is E)

To make sure the OA, you can search this question on the web, clearly OA is A.

Hope it clears your doubt.

Cheer and enjoy the question.
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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2013, 02:02
alimad wrote:
Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of sea ice in the Antartic if enough sunlight reaches that layer of ice and enough seawater, which contains nutrients, reaches that layer after splashing onto the surface. Even though moderate snow cover reduces the sunlight that filters into the top layer, sea ice with moderate snow cover typically contains even more algea in the top layer than does sea ice with less snow cover.

Which of the following , if true most helps to explain the apparent discrepancy?

As the weight of accumulated snow forces ice lower in the water, more seawater splashes onto the surface and seeps through the snow.

Seawater in the Antartic often contains higher concentrations of nutrients than does seawater in more temperate regions,

As the air temperature around sea ice decreases during the winter, the likelihood decreases that snow will fall and thus add to any existing snow cover.

The nutrients on which algae rely are common in seawater throughout the Antartic

More sunlight filters through a layer of ice than through an equally thick layer of snow.


Please let me know if my reason is correct for why E is not correct

Paradox is : sea ice with moderate snow cover typically contains even more algea in the top layer than does sea ice with less snow cover.
there is comparison between moderate snow and less snow, while E represents comparison between layer of ice and thick layer of snow. Hence E cannot be the answer.
Also if there is a thick layer of ice..dont think water can ever seep into it. So algae can get nutrients only from thick ice of seawater..whenever it melts.
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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2013, 03:28
ankur1901 wrote:

Please let me know if my reason is correct for why E is not correct

Paradox is : sea ice with moderate snow cover typically contains even more algea in the top layer than does sea ice with less snow cover.
there is comparison between moderate snow and less snow, while E represents comparison between layer of ice and thick layer of snow. Hence E cannot be the answer.
Also if there is a thick layer of ice..dont think water can ever seep into it. So algae can get nutrients only from thick ice of seawater..whenever it melts.


Hi Ankur,

Yes you are absolutely correct.

Basically this question is saying 2 things that are seemingly paradoxical.

1. Snow blocks light
2. But Snow covered ice has more life

So the answer needs to be something that gives a benefit to snow covered ice.

E is tempting because it seems to do that, but it actually doesn't. It doesn't explain that of 2 identical pieces of ice, the one covered with snow will have more life.

Cheers.

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Re: Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2014, 21:00
alimad wrote:
Microscopic plants called algea grow inside the top layer of sea ice in the Antartic if enough sunlight reaches that layer of ice and enough seawater, which contains nutrients, reaches that layer after splashing onto the surface. Even though moderate snow cover reduces the sunlight that filters into the top layer, sea ice with moderate snow cover typically contains even more algea in the top layer than does sea ice with less snow cover.

Which of the following , if true most helps to explain the apparent discrepancy?

As the weight of accumulated snow forces ice lower in the water, more seawater splashes onto the surface and seeps through the snow.

Seawater in the Antartic often contains higher concentrations of nutrients than does seawater in more temperate regions,

As the air temperature around sea ice decreases during the winter, the likelihood decreases that snow will fall and thus add to any existing snow cover.

The nutrients on which algae rely are common in seawater throughout the Antartic

More sunlight filters through a layer of ice than through an equally thick layer of snow.


Good Question...

Note that the argument initially tells us that for Algae to grow we need
*Enough Sunlight
*Enough Sea water..

Note the word to grow...
And later on the conclusion is that There is more algae when there is moderate snow cover than when there is less snow cover...
Ans Choice A says
With Moderate snow cover ---you will have more weight on top layer of sea which will sink ice lower in the water and get more water splashed and hence more nutrients but lesser light clearly pointing that nutrients is more important than sunlight for the algae population to grow

While will less snow cover, you will have more sunlight and less water being splashed vis-a-vis moderate snow cover and hence less nutrients..

Thus Nutrients are more important ad that is why we have more algae in moderate snow cover than in less snow cover...
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Microscopic plants called algae grow inside the top [#permalink]

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Microscopic plants called algae grow inside the top layer of sea ice in the Antarctic if enough sunlight reaches that layer of ice and enough seawater, which contains nutrients, reaches that layer after splashing onto the surface. Even though moderate snow cover reduces the sunlight that filters into the top layer, sea ice with moderate snow cover typically contains even more algae in the top layer than does sea ice with less snow cover. Which of the following, if true, most helps to explain the apparent discrepancy?

A. As the weight of accumulated snow forces ice lower in the water, more seawater splashes onto the surface and seeps through the snow.

B. Seawater in the Antarctic often contains higher concentrations of nutrients than does seawater in more temperate regions.

C. As the air temperature around sea ice decreases during the winter, the likelihood decreases that snow will fall and thus add to any existing snow cover.

D. The nutrients on which algae rely are common in seawater throughout the Antarctic.

E. More sunlight filters through a layer of ice than through an equally thick layer of snow.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
A. according to the problem, there are two requirements to grow algae:
(1) enough sunlight
(2) enough seawater

in the situation described in the passage, the total amount of sunlight is lower, but more algae actually grow. according to the conditions given above, the only way this could happen is if more seawater somehow gets in (since there is less sunlight, and that's the only other factor that's mentioned).
therefore, you are looking for a way in which more seawater will be admitted in the situation described.

this requirement is satisfied only by choice (a).

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Re: Microscopic plants called algae grow inside the top [#permalink]

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Re: Microscopic plants called algae grow inside the top [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2017, 07:07
Let's light up some discussion under this question :-D

souvik101990 wrote:
Microscopic plants called algae grow inside the top layer of sea ice in the Antarctic if enough sunlight reaches that layer of ice and enough seawater, which contains nutrients, reaches that layer after splashing onto the surface. Even though moderate snow cover reduces the sunlight that filters into the top layer, sea ice with moderate snow cover typically contains even more algae in the top layer than does sea ice with less snow cover.

Which of the following, if true, most helps to explain the apparent discrepancy?

Pre-think : something offsets the lost of sunlight and helps algae grow even better.

A. As the weight of accumulated snow forces ice lower in the water, more seawater splashes onto the surface and seeps through the snow.
Keep it for now.

B. Seawater in the Antarctic often contains higher concentrations of nutrients than does seawater in more temperate regions.
INCORRECT... out of scope.we don't care about other regions.

C. As the air temperature around sea ice decreases during the winter, the likelihood decreases that snow will fall and thus add to any existing snow cover.
INCORRECT... This doesn't resolve the discrepancy.We want to know why algae grows better under less sunlight.

D. The nutrients on which algae rely are common in seawater throughout the Antarctic.
INCORRECT... Irrelevant

E. More sunlight filters through a layer of ice than through an equally thick layer of snow.
INCORRECT... Irrelevant

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Re: Microscopic plants called algae grow inside the top   [#permalink] 24 Apr 2017, 07:07

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