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Most states impose limitations on the authority of the

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Most states impose limitations on the authority of the [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 03:44
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RMD007 wrote:
Requesting experts reply on this.

Can anybody please distinguish between the split to borrow money vs for borrowing money.

I was stuck between choice C and E. Finally went with E.


The best way to get an SC correct is to realize that there will always be more than one split between any two answer choices. So, if you can't decide on one split, look for other split.
Work on the other split between C and E - "limitations intended to.." vs "limitations with the intent...".
"with X" generally signify possession, so how can "limitation" posses "intent of protecting". And you are done...

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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2017, 00:07
Limitations intended to protect ....................is a noun+noun modifier.

Limitations for borrowing money is little awkward.
I think we limit to do something and not limit for doing something.
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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2017, 02:39
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RMD007 "For" vs. "to" in this sentence is just a matter of idiom. You can have "authority to do X," but not "authority for doing X."
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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the [#permalink]

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Here's a quick rundown on A-C:

A) There's only one objective here ("to protect"). We're protecting two things--taxpayers and the credit of the state--but that still constitutes one objective. Additionally, you're not likely to see a clunky construction like "with their objectives being" in a correct answer.

B) "The objectives of which" is a noun modifier, so it should touch the noun it's meant to modify. There can be exceptions to this rule ("The King of Spain, who visited me" clearly modifies "King" and not "Spain"), but the modifier can't jump over two prepositional phrases to modify "limitations." Even if it could, one could argue that limitations can't have objectives. Only the people or groups implementing them can! (As a side note, "the protecting of" is also terrible usage.)

C) The GMAT loves to throw us off by repeating a previous noun. This is meant to provide clarity--we're talking about those limitations, and not any of the nouns that have appeared since--but this kind of repetition scares away people who aren't used to seeing it. That's just what the GMAT wants: to use language in a way that those with less experience will find unfamiliar and wrong! That's how they tell the top scorers from the rest.

Here's another good example of what I'm talking about in C: https://gmatclub.com/forum/proponents-o ... 81789.html
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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the   [#permalink] 28 Sep 2017, 02:50

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