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Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by

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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Aug 2015, 18:19
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Akgmat85 wrote:
i find that i got trapped since argument speaks about motorcyclists who are involved in a serious accident, and answer choice talks about all motorcyclists, so i ruled it out as comparing two different subsets of data.

So to that, is it just a poorly written question or is it like that on purpose? and if on purpose, how do u reconcile comparing two subsets of data?


First of all, you need to understand the pattern how GMAT is testing you. For example %centages - normally GMAT tests the students:
1) Comparing %tages and actual Numbers
2) Changing the base of the %tages

So this question falls in the second category and as a student, you need to understand that change and be mindful of these changes.

This is not at all poorly written question and you need to practice more these type of questions to get a hang of these questions.

All the best.
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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Nov 2015, 06:25
Hi everybody,

This question is such a masterpiece that I thought I should post my 2 cents for those who still didn't get what the Q is basically talking about.

Pls refer the figure I attached:
Case I is the situation presented in the Q i.e. it represents the motorcyclists involved in a serious motorcycle accident
Case II and III represents those motorcyclists who NEVER involved in a serious motorcycle accident

Firstly, we have to consider those motorcyclists too who NEVER involved in a serious motorcycle accident, in order to recommend that the course would basically reduce the no. of serious motorcycle accidents.

Now, look at hypothetical case II, in which we see that only 9% motorcyclists took the course and the rest 91% didn't care. In this situation can we really say that more the motorcyclists take the course less the no. of serious accidents. NO, it seems the courses actually do not any role to prevent motorcyclists from serious accidents. So, conclusion doesn't hold here.

Now consider hypothetical case III, clearly the training made the difference here and we should recommend the course. In other words the conclusion is true. Note that for the case III to be true, overall, significantly more than eight percent of motorcyclists have taken a motorcycle-safety course. This is nothing but choice A.

I know we can't afford to think or draw in such details during GMAT but, this is to show you the level of thinking required by this kind of Qs. I prefer diagrams over words, so it was easy for me to think this way. Experts, pls correct my mistakes.

P.S. Sorry for the totally unprofessional diagram :wink:
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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Nov 2015, 10:17
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Now frankly speaking i think this question is overrated :)

I saw the difficulty level to be 85% and was over cautious while reading. Then i came to option A and spent good time there. I moved even without comprehending it 100%. But as soon as i read the other choices, i realized that all others were too distant from the topic at hand and hence are all either irrelevant or out of scope. I had my variance test ready, but never needed to use. Am i missing anything?

D has got the most votes! Why would we care about what the motorcycle has hit- a moving motorcycle,a truck ,a wall or anything for that sake. That's completely irrelevant. I mean.. seriously whats the catch that im missing?!?
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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jan 2016, 17:03
A : If the number of people who have taken the safety course is significantly higher than the overall 8% of all motorcyclists- then it shows that the motorcycle safety course is giving the desired effect. The 8% of the people who had taken the course and got involved in a bad accident is not filled filled up wholly by the people who took the course.

On the other hand if the number of people who who took the safety course is significantly less than overall 8% of motorcyclists - then it may suggest that almost all the people who took the safety course and still got into an accident are wholly representative of the the total number of people who took the course. Basically, everyone took the course and despite that got into an accident.

Hence, A is the correct answer.
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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jan 2016, 21:11
A.
The argument takes 92% of THOSE INVOLVED IN ACCCIDENT to make conclution for ALL MOTORIST.
Ex:
...............course..............no course.........total
Accident. 8. 92. 100
No acc.
Total. X. 1000-x. 1000
In choice A: if x=80(0.08*1000)=> accident rate for course and no course is the same. ==>weaken argu
The larger x is, the more strenthen the argument
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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2016, 18:49
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I got this question wrong when taking GmatPrep, but I honestly believe that understanding why we might select wrong answers helps us learn to make correct choices in the future.

I initially chose answer choice (D) when taking GmatPrep exam 1. When reading the question, I summarized the argument as follows: more cyclists taking courses will lead to fewer accidents. I then attempted to find an answer that would indicate this statement wasn't true.

I summarized answer choice (D) as:

If 92% of accidents involve someone else then there is the possibility that even if motorcyclists take course the number of accidents might not be reduced because we don't know anything about the behavior of other drivers. Admittedly, my logic here was wishy washy because we don't know for sure that the course still wouldn't help in this case. An evaluate answer must be one such that either an answer of "YES" or "No" either strengthens or weakens the argument. One caveat here that I feel isn't mentioned a lot is that the answer doesn't have to both strengthen and weaken. If an answer of "YES" strengthens, but an answer of "No" doesn't tell us much then the answer could still be correct.

With that said, I think one of the biggest mistakes here is that I was looking for an answer that weakened my summary of the argument above (courses -> fewer accidents). However, the question is not asking for something that would just weaken the argument. The argument is asking for something that evaluates the validity of evidence. This type of question is a little unusual for me personally.

The only answer choice that directly challenges the validity of the data itself is answer choice A. As someone already pointed out, answer choice D focus on 92% of "Accidents" instead of 92% of motorcyclists in accidents.

I realize my response might not be as profound as some others on this thread but I hope it was helpful to anyone who had a similar thought process as I did when answering this question.
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Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2016, 05:23
a = No of people taken the Safety Training
x = No of people who have taken the Safety Training and undergone accidents
b = No of people who have not taken the Safety Training
y = No of people who have not taken the Safety Training and undergone accidents

For the training to be successful ,

(x/a) < (y/b)
or, (a/b)>(x/y)
or, (a/(a+b))> (x/(x+y))
or, Percentage of people undergone safety training > Percentage of people involved in accidents and have taken the safety courses

From question,

Percentage of people undergone safety training > 8 %
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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2016, 19:38
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Although I marked D as an answer, I had a little hard time understanding A as an answer. The number approach below helped -

Suppose, there are 200 motorists, and among those, 100 are involved in accidents.
This implies, 92% of 100, i.e. 92 motorists who were involved in accidents did not took the safety course. Also, remaining 8 motorists did.

Now, among total 200 motorists did more then 8% of motorists took safety course -->

YES - that means more than 8%=16 motorists, lets take 17. This means 17 motorists took the course and among those, 8 were involved in accidents, which is less than 50% of people who took safety course. This implies safety course did help majority motorists (=9) avoid accidents.

NO - that means less than 8%=16 motorists, lets take 15. This means 15 motorists took the course and among those, 8 were involved in accidents, which is MORE than 50% of people who took safety course. This implies safety course did NOT help majority avoid accidents.

Therefore its important to get an answer for A to support safety course.
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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2017, 09:26
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Hello Verbal Experts (GMATNinja,e-Gmat)

I am confused how option A is the answer?

Can someone help over here..

Thanks in advance!
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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Dec 2017, 19:07
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SidJainGMAT wrote:
Hello Verbal Experts (GMATNinja,e-Gmat)

I am confused how option A is the answer?

Can someone help over here..

Thanks in advance!

Quote:
A) Whether significantly more than eight percent of motorcyclists have taken a motorcycle-safety course

We are told that 92% of the motorcyclists involved in serious accidents (NOT 92% of ALL motorcyclists) have never taken a safety course. This also means that 8% of those involved in serious accidents HAVE taken a safety course.

Before we dig into choice (A), pretend that half of ALL motorcyclists took a safety course and the other half did not. In that case, consider the following possible results from the data:

  • Half of motorcyclists involved in serious accidents took the course and half did not (an even split) - this would suggest that the course had no effect. Motorcyclists who took a safety course were just as likely to get in a serious accident as motorcyclists who did not take a safety course.
  • Most motorcyclists involved in serious accidents did NOT take the course - this would suggest that the course did help. Motorcyclists who did not take the course were MORE likely to get in a serious accident.

Now, what if only 8% of all motorcyclists have taken a safety course? Well, if the course was useless, then we would expect that 8% of those involved in serious accidents have taken the course. It would be like if we painted blue nail polish on 8% of all motorcyclists. If the nail polish has no effect on safety, then we would expect 8% of those involved in serious accidents to have blue nail polish. In other words, those with blue nail polish are just as likely to be involved in a serious accident as those without blue nail polish.

Similarly, if only 8% of motorcyclists have taken a safety course, then this would suggest that the safety courses did NOT have a significant effect on safety, hurting the argument. However, if significantly more than eight percent of motorcyclists have taken a motorcycle-safety course, then the data would suggest that the safety courses were effective.

Thus, choice (A) is the best answer.
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Re: Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2018, 19:57
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Motorcycle-safety courses, offered by a number of organizations, teach motorcyclists important techniques for handling their vehicles and for safely sharing the road with other road users. If more motorcyclists took these courses, there would be fewer serious motorcycle accidents. Data show that 92 percent of the motorcyclists who are involved in a serious motorcycle accident have never taken a motorcycle-safety course.

In assessing whether the data cited provide support for the position taken about more motorcyclists’ taking the courses, it would be most useful to determine which of the following?

Cool, question is asking for what will be helpful to determine the blue above

A) Whether significantly more than eight percent of motorcyclists have taken a motorcycle-safety course Maybe. Leave it on side. No reason to reject
B) Whether it is riskier for a motorcyclist to ride with a passenger behind the rider than to ride alone Too much implied and not enough mentioned in stem. This is overthinking it. Reject
C) Whether the different organizations that offer motorcycle-safety courses differ in the content of the courses that they offer Nothing in the stem talks about different courses. Reject.
D) Whether more than 92 percent of serious motorcycle accidents involve collisions between a motorcycle and another vehicle in motion So what is it's with a crash against a pavement or another vehicle? I don't see how this is relevant.
E) Whether variations in the size and potential speed of a motorcycle influence the risk of a serious accident’s occurring Same as above, no information is provided about size and speed of a motorcycle in the stem or in the course

Via POE, I would choose A.
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