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Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in

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Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 28 Sep 2018, 02:42
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Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in environments that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any deterioration. Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well. If, as some museum directors believe, paint is the most sensitive substance in these works, then by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings. Museums would be rash to relax those standards, however, since results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity.

In the argument above, the two portions in boldface play which of the following roles?


(A) The first is an objection that has been raised against the position taken by the argument; the second is the position taken by the argument.

(B) The first is the position taken by the argument; the second is the position that the argument calls into question.

(C) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is a circumstance on which that judgment is, in part, based.

(D) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is that position.

(E) The first is a claim that the argument calls into question; the second is the position taken by the argument.


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Spoiler: :: OFFICIAL EXPLANATION
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Originally posted by aurobindo on 31 Jan 2007, 07:21.
Last edited by Bunuel on 28 Sep 2018, 02:42, edited 6 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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QOTD: Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2018, 21:02
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Start by ignoring the bold face and focusing on the conclusion: "Museums would be rash to relax [the standards for temperature and humidity control]."

Now, let's follow the winding logical path that the author takes to arrive at this conclusion:

  • "Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in environments that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any deterioration." - Museums with such paintings have certain standards for temperature and humidity to avoid deterioration of those paintings.
  • "Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well." The museums have temp/humidity standards to protect the paintings. However, lab tests show that the paint in those paintings actually adjusts quite well to climatic changes (i.e. changes in temperature and humidity). This implies that the museums don't need to regulate the temp and humidity to protect the paint.
  • Some museum directors believe that "paint is the most sensitive substance in these works." If that is indeed the case, then think about how those directors would respond to the lab tests. They would say, "Well, the paint is not sensitive to temp and humidity. Since the paint is the most sensitive substance, then NO substance in the paintings should be sensitive to temp and humidity. In that case, why waste money (energy costs) regulating the temp and humidity?

That sounds reasonable, but the author believes that "museums would be rash (i.e. reckless/imprudent) to relax those standards. How does the author explain this position?

  • "Results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity."

That last part is evidence that the museum directors (some of them, anyway) are wrong to say that paint is the most sensitive substance. These preliminary tests indicate that gesso is MORE sensitive to humidity than the paint itself. So if we don't regulate the humidity, the gesso might fail, leading to deterioration.

Now that we clearly understand the argument, we can take a look at the BF portions to see how they fit in:

  • "paint is the most sensitive substance in these works" - This is the belief (or judgment) of some museum directors. The last part of the passage is evidence suggesting that this belief is incorrect.
  • "museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings" - Based on the laboratory tests AND their belief (as stated in the 1st BF portion), some museum directors arrive at this conclusion. In other words, this is the "position" of those museum directors.

Quote:
(A) The first is an objection that has been raised against the position taken by the argument; the second is the position taken by the argument.

The 2nd is the position taken by some museum directors, NOT by the argument or the author. So the second half of (A) is definitely wrong. Also, the 1st BF portion is a belief of some museum directors, not an objection to the author's position. Eliminate (A).

Quote:
(B) The first is the position taken by the argument; the second is the position that the argument calls into question.

The 1st is a belief of the museum directors, not a position taken by the argument/author. The 2nd is indeed a position that the argument calls into question. But since the first half of (B) is inaccurate, we have to eliminate (B).

Quote:
(C) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is a circumstance on which that judgment is, in part, based.

The first half of (C) looks good. The 1st BF portion is the belief/judgment of the museum directors. This judgment supports their position, and the argument does call that position into question. But the 2nd BF portion IS that position, not a circumstance on which the museum directors' judgment is based.

In other words, the fact that "museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings" does not CAUSE the museum directors to believe that paint is the most sensitive part. In fact, it's the other way around. So the second half of (C) is wrong, and we must eliminate this one.

Quote:
(D) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is that position.

The 1st BF portion is the belief, or judgment, of the museum directors. This belief supports their position, which is stated in the 2nd BF portion. Citing evidence that contradicts the belief of those museum directors, the author questions their position. Choice (D) is spot on!

Quote:
(E) The first is a claim that the argument calls into question; the second is the position taken by the argument

The first half of (E) is okay. The argument does call this belief into question. But the 2nd BF portion is the position of the museum directors, not the position of the argument/author. Eliminate (E).

(D) is the best answer.
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Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2008, 08:43
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aurobindo wrote:
Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in environments that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any deterioration. Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well. If, as some museum directors believe, paint is the most sensitive substance in these works, then by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings. Museums would be rash to relax those standards, however, since results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity.

In the argument above, the two portions in boldface play which of the following roles?


(A) The first is an objection that has been raised against the position taken by the argument; the second is the position taken by the argument.

(B) The first is the position taken by the argument; the second is the position that the argument calls into question.

(C) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is a circumstance on which that judgment is, in part, based.

(D) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is that position.

(E) The first is a claim that the argument calls into question; the second is the position taken by the argument.


D.

Main conclusion of the arg: Museums will be rash in relaxing temperature requirements because tests show evidence contrary to what museum directors believe.

A, B, E can be eliminated easily; the second part is not the position taken by the argument.
C can be eliminated; the second part is not a circumstance on which that judgment is in part based. The second is the position that the argument calls into question.
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Re: Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2008, 09:28
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Here is my attempt to explain :

0.Issue - topic of argument
Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in envbironments
that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any
deterioration.Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings
actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well.Can the museum rleax standards based on the tests?

1.Conclusion -What does the author think?
Museums would be rash to relax those standards

2.Position - point of view or attitude about an issue or question
museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings.

3. Judgement -an opinion formed from a consideration of the facts.
as some museum directors believe,paint is the most sensitive substance in these works


Please correct me if Iam wrong.
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New post 01 Feb 2007, 04:02
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:oops: Hi All,
lets discuss what GMAC means by "Claim", "position", "judgement". Such terms may reappear and then discuss this question again.

I think:
Claim: each side of argument
Position: just a stand point or a view on which a claim is made.
judgement: When supported by aurgument, a Position should be concidered as judgement.
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New post 18 Aug 2017, 10:47
2
Found Best solution for this problem.


https://e-gmat.com/blogs/og13-123-renai ... paintings/

Kudos if you like the information :)
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Re: QOTD: Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2018, 05:17
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C is wrong because
Judgement : Paint is the most sensitive substance in these paints is NOT BASED on museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings. BUT the statement: museums can reduce.... these paintings is BASED on paint is the most sensitive substance.

D is right. 1st is the judgement or belief provided offering support to a position. 2nd is THAT position, which the author objects.
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New post 03 Dec 2009, 00:44
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I choose D here.
Read carefully and try to paraphrase what you read.

Let's take a look at first bold.
If, as some museum directors believe, paint is
the most sensitive substance in these works
,
Notice, that it directors believe. It's not a position, nor an evidence, nor a claim, nor an objection. It looks like judgement.

First bold lead to second bold directly. First supports second clearly. The second looks like position.

museums can reduce energy
costs without risking damage to these paintings


However, further this position is called into question. (possible risk to painting occurs)

D captures all mentioned above

aurobindo wrote:
Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in environments that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any deterioration. Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well. If, as some museum directors believe, paint is the most sensitive substance in these works, then by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings. Museums would be rash to relax those standards, however, since results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity.

In the argument above, the two portions in boldface play which of the following roles?


(A) The first is an objection that has been raised against the position taken by the argument; the second is the position taken by the argument.

(B) The first is the position taken by the argument; the second is the position that the argument calls into question.

(C) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is a circumstance on which that judgment is, in part, based.

(D) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is that position.

(E) The first is a claim that the argument calls into question; the second is the position taken by the argument.
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New post 12 Sep 2011, 22:14
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Hi,

I think this is the question adopted from OG. Though I have seen you post late (I started my preparation 2 months ago and now am intrested to work actively in this forum), I have some suggestions to offer in line with the question asked by you.

Facts: i have completed my OG verbal reasoning and I found that "minor type questions" which have "bold faced questions" as subtopic are also my weakness. But at the same time, I am practicing to improve on it. That made me see your post.

Opinion: I have started to love these questions since they challenge me every time but I have not mastered them. Also, these questions are time taking and you might not encounter more than one question on the real GMAT, do not focus much on these. However, you must not entirely forget them.

Conclusion: You must try to get the maximum information about these questions in less time.

My suggestion would be to go through the manhattan CR stretegy guide and then there is a trick given to plumb these questions. Initially by learning that, you wont be able to solve all the questions (my own assumption, may not be so) but then practice few more questions on GMAT forums and then I think you would start getting them.

By the way, I have been practicing these questions since last two days and I could not get this correct again after OG since I have not mastered.

But I wanted to offer the solution which I feel is right since I am facing the same problem and that's how I plan to uproot it.
(If you dont have manhattan, let me know. I can explain it to you)
Kudos for me if you like my suggestion.

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New post 22 Jun 2012, 11:29
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Nicely explained ! Thanks!

Just wanted to make sure that "Position" and "Judgement" have the same meaning and that choice B is incorrect because it states that "Position taken by the argument" and not "Position taken by the directors of museum"
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Re: QOTD: Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2018, 17:44
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adkikani wrote:
Quote:
Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in environments that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any deterioration. Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well. If, as some museum directors believe, paint is the most sensitive substance in these works, then by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings. Museums would be rash to relax those standards, however, since results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity.



GMATNinja


Quote:
]Some museum directors believe that "paint is the most sensitive substance in these works." If that is indeed the case, then think about how those directors would respond to the lab tests. They would say, "Well, the paint is not sensitive to temp and humidity. Since the paint is the most sensitive substance, then NO substance in the paintings should be sensitive to temp and humidity. In that case, why waste money (energy costs) regulating the temp and humidity?


Is there a typo error in above and correct version should be:
They (museum directors) would say, "Well, the paint is sensitive to temp and humidity.

My reasoning: the inherent property of oil paint makes
my deterioration of paints less susceptible to weather changes and hence no energy costs are needed to regulate external temp and humidity.

Usually in bold face we link opinions of different characters in argument to author's opinion.
Here I am unable to link lab test results to music directors's judgement.

DAVEexamPAL
Quote:
The passage outlines a position taken by some museum directors (MD)- according to which, since paint is the leastsensitive and can withstand changes, changes in temperature can be made, and then calls that position into question - since Gesso may actually be more sensitive. Thus, the first BF (paint is the most sensitive) is a judgement that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question, and the second (changes in humidity can be made is that position.


Do not MD take the position that paint is most sensitive?

Nope, not a typo! "Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well." If the paint adjusts to climatic changes quite well, then we can say that it is NOT sensitive to climatic changes (i.e. temperature and humidity). So if paint is THE MOST SENSITIVE substance and yet it is NOT sensitive to climatic changes, then surely no other substance will be sensitive to climatic changes.

Yes, the MD's believe paint is the most sensitive, but that doesn't necessarily mean that it is sensitive to climatic changes.

For example, you could own several plants and say that one is the most sensitive plant that you own. Yet, that plant is able to withstand large fluctuates in temperature and humidity. So even though it is the MOST sensitive plant that you own, it is NOT sensitive to those changes. This implies that none of your plants would be sensitive to those changes.

In other words, being the most sensitive doesn't necessarily mean that it is sensitive to everything.

I hope that helps!
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New post 29 Jun 2012, 13:00
Great question monsoon1. Position and Judgement can be interchanged in certain scenarios because they are quite inter-related. You take a position on something based on your judgement. for example: I support Obama (my position) because in my opinion (judgement) he is better suited to take the country out of recession. Now, can I say that my position is that Obama is better suited to take the country out of recession - yes I can say that.

Let me know if this helps.
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New post 07 Sep 2013, 07:27
vsaxenaGMAT wrote:
:oops: Hi All,
lets discuss what GMAC means by "Claim", "position", "judgement". Such terms may reappear and then discuss this question again.

I think:
Claim: each side of argument
Position: just a stand point or a view on which a claim is made.
judgement: When supported by aurgument, a Position should be concidered as judgement.

Can someone elaborate the above three definition.
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New post 09 Sep 2013, 03:25
animesh_an wrote:
vsaxenaGMAT wrote:
:oops: Hi All,
lets discuss what GMAC means by "Claim", "position", "judgement". Such terms may reappear and then discuss this question again.

I think:
Claim: each side of argument
Position: just a stand point or a view on which a claim is made.
judgement: When supported by aurgument, a Position should be concidered as judgement.

Can someone elaborate the above three definition.


Hi Animesh,

I don't agree with the above definitions. All of these three words could be used to refer to the same statement. For example: If I say:

Joe is an idiot since he does not care about studies.

Here, the underlined part "Joe is an idiot" is my judgment about Joe. Right? You know about judgments that people make about others. So, I can call this statement a "judgment".
I can also call it my claim since I am claiming something i.e. "Joe is an idiot". I can also claim " I am super human". In a similar way, "Joe is an idiot" can also be called a claim.
Lastly, "Joe is an idiot" is also my position or the position of the argument since the argument as a whole seeks to establish that "Joe is an idiot" by providing a reason that "he does not care about the studies".

The same statement "Joe is an idiot" in the above context can also be called "the main conclusion of the argument", or "opinion", or "belief".

There are no specific definition for these words in the context of GMAT; what these words mean in our everyday life is what they mean in GMAT. So, if you know the meaning of these terms from your everyday usage, you need not cram any definitions.

I think you should solve some official CR questions. You'll then better appreciate what I have said here.

Also, e-GMAT offers "Bold Face" concept files as part of the free trial. You may want to try it out. It' completely. Click on the below image.

Image


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Re: Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2014, 09:22
Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in envbironments that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any deterioration. Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well. If, as some museum directors believe, paint is the most sensitive substance in these works, then by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings. Museums would be rash to relax those standards, however, since results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity.

In the argument above, the two portions in boldface play which of the following roles?


- Background
- Evidence
B - hypothetical situation
B - hypothetical outcome
- Evidence against the adoption of the hypothetical situation.

Moreover: Boldface statements agree to each other. The main conclusion doesn't agree with the boldface statements


A. The first is an objection that has been raised against the position taken by the argument; the second is the position taken by the argument.
The second is not the position taken by the argument. Out
B. The first is the position taken by the argument; the second is the position that the argument calls into question.
The first is not the position taken by the argument. Out
C. The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is a circumstance on which that judgment is, in part based.
The second is not a circumstance, it is the hypothetical outcome. Out
D. The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is that position.
Fits perfectly
E. The first is a claim that the argument calls into question; the second is the position taken by the argument.
The second is not the position taken by the argument. Out
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New post 29 Apr 2017, 10:36
Hi Experts,

Can you suggest my flaw while dissecting below argument:
Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in environments that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any deterioration.

This is a fact

Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well.

This is a fact because of - lab tests have ....

If, as some museum directors believe, paint is the most sensitive substance in these works, then by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings.

This whole statement is a belief of M directors and this is where I faltered.According to me M directors make a conditional statement that by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, they can achieve goal of - museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings. This is aptly supported by fact that - paint is the most sensitive substance in these works

So, tell here,according to me - BF1 is a fact and BF2 is opinion of people.

When I read the solution, I could not make out that - museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings - is the author's main opinion.

Further reading:
Museums would be rash to relax those standards, however, since results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity.

All this is a fact. However, once I have established the BF part earlier is it important to read rest of argument? How to co-relate the same with two BF.
WR,
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Re: Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2017, 16:36
Quote:
Hi Experts,

Can you suggest my flaw while dissecting below argument:
Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in environments that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any deterioration.

This is a fact

Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well.

This is a fact because of - lab tests have ....

If, as some museum directors believe, paint is the most sensitive substance in these works, then by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings.

This whole statement is a belief of M directors and this is where I faltered.According to me M directors make a conditional statement that by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, they can achieve goal of - museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings. This is aptly supported by fact that - paint is the most sensitive substance in these works

So, tell here,according to me - BF1 is a fact and BF2 is opinion of people.

When I read the solution, I could not make out that - museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings - is the author's main opinion.

Further reading:
Museums would be rash to relax those standards, however, since results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity.

All this is a fact. However, once I have established the BF part earlier is it important to read rest of argument? How to co-relate the same with two BF.
WR,
Arpit

First problem: "This is aptly supported by fact that - paint is the most sensitive substance in these works". Notice that the first boldfaced portion is preceded by "IF"... this is a conditional statement relying on something that has NOT been proven as fact. "If it rains today, I will get wet." - I don't know for a fact that it will rain.

Second problem: "museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings - is the author's main opinion." This is not in fact the author's main opinion; rather, this is the main opinion of the directors who WRONGLY believe that "paint is the most sensitive substance in these works". The author of the passage is saying that IF you believe that paint is the most sensitive substance in these works (judgement), THEN you will take the position that museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to the paintings. This fits with choice D. The author of the passage then presents evidence that this judgement is FALSE: "results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity." This evidence suggests that gesso, not paint, is the most sensitive substance in those works. If the temperature and humidity standards are relaxed, the paint will be fine, but the gesso will probably fail, risking damage to the paintings.

I hope that helps!
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Re: QOTD: Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2018, 01:12
The answer is (D).

Solution:
The passage outlines a position taken by some museum directors - according to which, since paint is the least sensitive and can withstand changes, changes in temperature can be made, and then calls that position into question - since Gesso may actually be more sensitive. Thus, the first BF (paint is the most sensitive) is a judgement that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question, and the second (changes in humidity can be made is that position.

Another way to solve - using the process of elimination:

(A) The first is an objection that has been raised against the position taken by the argument; the second is the position taken by the argument.
No, the second is not the position taken by the argument, but rather the opposite - a position the argument questions

(B) The first is the position taken by the argument; the second is the position that the argument calls into question.
No, the first is not a position at all, it is a judgement which supports the position that the argument questions

(C) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is a circumstance on which that judgment is, in part, based.
The first part is true, but the second is not a circumstance, it is the position which is being called into question itself

(D) The first is a judgment that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question; the second is that position.
Yes!

(E) The first is a claim that the argument calls into question; the second is the position taken by the argument.
No, the second is not the position taken by the argument, but the reverse
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QOTD: Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2018, 06:34
Quote:
Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically store them in environments that are carefully kept within narrow margins of temperature and humidity to inhibit any deterioration. Laboratory tests have shown that the kind of oil paint used in these paintings actually adjusts to climatic changes quite well. If, as some museum directors believe, paint is the most sensitive substance in these works, then by relaxing the standards for temperature and humidity control, museums can reduce energy costs without risking damage to these paintings. Museums would be rash to relax those standards, however, since results of preliminary tests indicate that gesso, a compound routinely used by Renaissance artists to help paint adhere to the canvas, is unable to withstand significant variations in humidity.



GMATNinja


Quote:
]Some museum directors believe that "paint is the most sensitive substance in these works." If that is indeed the case, then think about how those directors would respond to the lab tests. They would say, "Well, the paint is not sensitive to temp and humidity. Since the paint is the most sensitive substance, then NO substance in the paintings should be sensitive to temp and humidity. In that case, why waste money (energy costs) regulating the temp and humidity?


Is there a typo error in above and correct version should be:
They (museum directors) would say, "Well, the paint is sensitive to temp and humidity.

My reasoning: the inherent property of oil paint makes
my deterioration of paints less susceptible to weather changes and hence no energy costs are needed to regulate external temp and humidity.

Usually in bold face we link opinions of different characters in argument to author's opinion.
Here I am unable to link lab test results to music directors's judgement.

DAVEexamPAL
Quote:
The passage outlines a position taken by some museum directors (MD)- according to which, since paint is the leastsensitive and can withstand changes, changes in temperature can be made, and then calls that position into question - since Gesso may actually be more sensitive. Thus, the first BF (paint is the most sensitive) is a judgement that has been offered in support of the position that the argument calls into question, and the second (changes in humidity can be made is that position.


Do not MD take the position that paint is most sensitive?
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QOTD: Museums that house Renaissance oil paintings typically   [#permalink] 25 Apr 2018, 06:34

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