It is currently 17 Feb 2018, 17:05

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 Dec 2012
Posts: 20
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jan 2014, 07:14
The correct answer is C.

A has the problem "Most" the stimulus is "Often"
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Jan 2013
Posts: 8
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jan 2014, 09:25
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
In this we need to look for a statement that best supports either of these:
• Dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery
• Dull Companion also diverts the readers from correct solution
• Dull companion usually uses the same clues used by brilliant detective to infer an inaccurate solution

Options:
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story. – Information already given in paragraph not a supporting statement
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story. - Information does not support any of the above points.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery. – could support point 1 but can not support all the cases as it says “some mystery stories” also does not talk about dull companion
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion. – This statement ofcourse supports point no 2 and does not contradict any other point
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution. - – this cannot be the solution as the statement itself says that the detective uses the same clues as used by brilliant detective. So clues used by brilliant detective cannot be misleading. Thus this contradicts point 3
Hence D
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2014
Posts: 3
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Sep 2014, 23:33
The ans is definitely E

We are talking about the dull companion.
A is correct but by the POE we will give more preference to 'E' as that is the main topic of discussion.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2014
Posts: 3
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Sep 2014, 23:34
The ans is definitely E

We are talking about the dull companion.
A is correct but by the POE we will give more preference to 'E' as that is the main topic of discussion.
Expert Post
MBA Section Director
User avatar
D
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 4820
Location: India
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GPA: 3.8
WE: Marketing (Non-Profit and Government)
*700* Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the dete [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Apr 2015, 22:05
Expert's post
8
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution. Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?

a) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.

b) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.

c) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.

d) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.

e) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.
_________________

My GMAT Resources
V30-V40: How to do it! | GMATPrep SC | GMATPrep CR | GMATPrep RC | Critical Reasoning Megathread | CR: Numbers and Statistics | CR: Weaken | CR: Strengthen | CR: Assumption | SC: Modifier | SC: Meaning | SC: SV Agreement | RC: Primary Purpose | PS/DS: Numbers and Inequalities | PS/DS: Combinatorics and Coordinates

My MBA Resources
Everything about the MBA Application | Over-Represented MBA woes | Fit Vs Rankings | Low GPA: What you can do | Letter of Recommendation: The Guide | Indian B Schools accepting GMAT score | Why MBA?

My Reviews
Veritas Prep Live Online

Expert Post
5 KUDOS received
MBA Section Director
User avatar
D
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 4820
Location: India
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GPA: 3.8
WE: Marketing (Non-Profit and Government)
Re: *700* Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the dete [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Apr 2015, 18:36
5
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
4
This post was
BOOKMARKED
The thing is that "most" has a formal logical meaning: it means "more than 50%." Therefore, unless we can clarify that more than half of all the mystery stories in the world match the description in the stimulus, we can't choose (A).

For example, it would be acceptable to say that "NBA players are often over 7 feet in height." There certainly are a lot more 7+ feet people in the NBA than in the regular population! However, it would be inaccurate to say that "most NBA players are over 7 feet in height," since the majority of players aren't.

Similarly, if you see the word "most" in a stimulus, it gives you a lot of information. If I tell you that "Most race-car drivers have one-syllable names," you can deduce that "There are more race-car drivers with one-syllable names than there are with three-syllable names." It's a very powerful word!

Notice the word "some" in the correct answer choice. This is exactly the kind of word you're looking for in an Inference Question (much like the equally good word, "can"). The only formal logical definition of "some" is "more than zero," so as long as we have evidence that one such mystery story matches the description above (we do know this much from the stimulus), it's acceptable.

Takeaways:

1) The words "some" and "can" imply any number, one or more. That's all they imply, so they give very little information if they appear in the stimulus, and are very commonly found in right answers on Inference questions.

2) The word "most" implies greater than half, so if it appears in the stimulus, it tells you a lot, and if it appears in an answer choice, it needs specific evidence to support it.

3) The words "often" and "many" don't really have any formal definition -- don't ascribe to them anything beyond the meaning of "some."
_________________

My GMAT Resources
V30-V40: How to do it! | GMATPrep SC | GMATPrep CR | GMATPrep RC | Critical Reasoning Megathread | CR: Numbers and Statistics | CR: Weaken | CR: Strengthen | CR: Assumption | SC: Modifier | SC: Meaning | SC: SV Agreement | RC: Primary Purpose | PS/DS: Numbers and Inequalities | PS/DS: Combinatorics and Coordinates

My MBA Resources
Everything about the MBA Application | Over-Represented MBA woes | Fit Vs Rankings | Low GPA: What you can do | Letter of Recommendation: The Guide | Indian B Schools accepting GMAT score | Why MBA?

My Reviews
Veritas Prep Live Online

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 01 Jun 2013
Posts: 126
GMAT 1: 650 Q50 V27
GMAT ToolKit User
*700* Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the dete [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Sep 2015, 22:39
Thank you Souvik, It is truly a fantastic explanation. Yet, I am little perplexed with the colored word. Did you really mean "can" or you meant to say "may". If it is "can", would you explain why you think it is equally powerful word, like "some" ?

Notice the word "some" in the correct answer choice. This is exactly the kind of word you're looking for in an Inference Question (much like the equally good word, "can"). The only formal logical definition of "some" is "more than zero," so as long as we have evidence that one such mystery story matches the description above (we do know this much from the stimulus), it's acceptable.

Thank you
_________________

Please kindly click on "+1 Kudos", if you think my post is useful

Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 18 Sep 2014
Posts: 1199
Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: *700* Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the dete [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2015, 08:32
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion.
Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution.
Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.

Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?

a) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(detective uses to deduce the correct solution but not mentioned whether he solves the mystery.)

b) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
(Opposite. it is mentioned that readers often get diverted with dull's story but Nowhere it is mentioned that )

c) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.
(They offer same enough clues to everyone including detective, his assistant and reader.)

d) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
(opposite it diverts and clarifies the mystery)

e) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.(opposite dull companion diverts us)

souvik101990 can you analyse my explanation for all options and tell me whether I got wrong anywhere?
_________________

The only time you can lose is when you give up. Try hard and you will suceed.
Thanks = Kudos. Kudos are appreciated

http://gmatclub.com/forum/rules-for-posting-in-verbal-gmat-forum-134642.html
When you post a question Pls. Provide its source & TAG your questions
Avoid posting from unreliable sources.


My posts
http://gmatclub.com/forum/beauty-of-coordinate-geometry-213760.html#p1649924
http://gmatclub.com/forum/calling-all-march-april-gmat-takers-who-want-to-cross-213154.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/possessive-pronouns-200496.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/double-negatives-206717.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/the-greatest-integer-function-223595.html#p1721773
https://gmatclub.com/forum/improve-reading-habit-233410.html#p1802265

Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 18 Sep 2014
Posts: 1199
Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: *700* Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the dete [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2015, 09:05
souvik101990 wrote:

2) The word "most" implies greater than half, so if it appears in the stimulus, it tells you a lot, and if it appears in an answer choice, it needs specific evidence to support it.

3) The words "often" and "many" don't really have any formal definition -- don't ascribe to them anything beyond the meaning of "some."


While your explanation seems very good, I'm not able to overcome my confusion in which I feel the meaning of the words most , often and many is almost same.
While at-least often and many mean a lot of things, you say they sound nothing beyond some.
Can u please explain?
_________________

The only time you can lose is when you give up. Try hard and you will suceed.
Thanks = Kudos. Kudos are appreciated

http://gmatclub.com/forum/rules-for-posting-in-verbal-gmat-forum-134642.html
When you post a question Pls. Provide its source & TAG your questions
Avoid posting from unreliable sources.


My posts
http://gmatclub.com/forum/beauty-of-coordinate-geometry-213760.html#p1649924
http://gmatclub.com/forum/calling-all-march-april-gmat-takers-who-want-to-cross-213154.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/possessive-pronouns-200496.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/double-negatives-206717.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/the-greatest-integer-function-223595.html#p1721773
https://gmatclub.com/forum/improve-reading-habit-233410.html#p1802265

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 Jul 2014
Posts: 7
GMAT ToolKit User
*700* Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the dete [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Sep 2015, 11:31
souvik101990 wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution. Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?

a) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.

b) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.

c) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.

d) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.

e) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.


Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution. Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?

a) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story. Does not tell us anything about the readers perspective

b) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.Nowhere it is said the the readers will solve the mystery. The argument just mentions that the readers have a chance and the dull companion diverts them

c) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.Correct. As souvik mentioned, some is the right indicative in such kind of questions. It correctly indicates that the some mystery stories may give the readers clues to infer the correct solution. The readers may or may not be mislead but they still have chance

d) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.Actually weakens the argument

e) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.The split is between C and E. However it points out that the dull companion misleads the reader, it nowhere indicates that readers still have chance at solving the mystery from the clues in the story which is pointed out by C.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Jul 2015
Posts: 1
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Mar 2016, 19:11
noboru wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.


A is wrong because of "Most". it should be "frequently" or "oftenly".
B is wrong because of "Often". It should be here "sometimes".
C is correct as it is simply claiming that some mystery stories give enough clues to solve the mystery. It means that some gives, and some don't give, which is true.
D is wrong because of "Rarely", because we don't know whether it frequently divert, mostly divert, sometimes divert or rarely divert, we don't have information.
E is wrong because is it opposite to what is said in argument.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 22 May 2017
Posts: 95
GMAT 1: 580 Q41 V29
GMAT 2: 580 Q43 V27
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jul 2017, 08:31

Last edited by Adityagmatclub on 22 Jul 2017, 08:44, edited 1 time in total.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 22 May 2017
Posts: 95
GMAT 1: 580 Q41 V29
GMAT 2: 580 Q43 V27
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jul 2017, 08:42
noboru wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.

LSAT


I generally use elimination technique to answer critical reasoning questions. Firstly, I eliminate A and D and then I eliminate C---> As it is not supporting author's strategy of including dull companion for solving the mystery and diverting them.
then I eliminate E---> it is a close option---As it discuss dull companion in mystery story generally uncovering misleading clues, which is not mentioned in the passage.

Answer option B
Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 7934
Location: Pune, India
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jul 2017, 00:18
noboru wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.

LSAT


We are looking for the inference from the argument.
The argument says: The author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
The author implies that including the dull companion helps readers follow the clues as followed by the companion and diverts them from the actual clues and hence from the correct solution. The implication is that diversion is needed from the correct solution. This means that at least some stories do provide enough clues to arrive at the correct solution. So (C) is correct.

Let's look at why (B) and (E) do not make sense.

(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.

This is not implied by the argument. We are given that the dull companion diverts the reader from the correct solution. So it seems that the readers often arrive at the incorrect solution, as presented by the dull companion. The argument doesn't imply that the readers are able to spot the mistakes in the companion's reasoning. So this is not correct.

(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.

We know that clues are given. But we are given that the companion wrongly infers them. We are not given that the clues are misleading.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
B
Joined: 13 Feb 2015
Posts: 881
Premium Member
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jul 2017, 22:34
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
_________________

Please Read: Verbal Posting Rules

BSchool Forum Moderator
avatar
P
Joined: 17 Jun 2016
Posts: 535
Location: India
GMAT 1: 720 Q49 V39
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V37
GPA: 3.65
WE: Engineering (Energy and Utilities)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Aug 2017, 03:13
OE :
The correct answer choice is (C). The last sentence contains a conclusion,
and this conclusion is the primary evidence that supports answer choice (C).
Answer choice (A): The word “often” in the first sentence is the key to this
answer choice. “Often” means frequently, but frequently is not the same as
“most.” Had the stimulus said “more often than not,” that would mean “most”
and this answer choice would be correct. Answer choice (B): We cannot
determine if readers of mystery stories solve the mystery simply by spotting
the errors of the dull companion. Answer choice (C): This is the correct
answer. The second sentence indicates that “clues are presented in the
story...the detective uses to deduce the correct solution.” Combined with the
last sentence, which states “the author’s strategy...gives readers a chance to
solve the mystery,” this answer choice is proven by facts. Answer choice (D):
Look for the facts in the stimulus—do they support this answer? Although the
dull companion diverts readers from the correct solution, we do not know if
actions of the brilliant detective rarely divert readers from the actions of the
dull companion. Answer choice (E): This is a tricky answer choice if you do
not read closely. The stimulus states that the dull companion infers a wrong
solution from clues that the brilliant detective ultimately uses to solve the
mystery. Answer choice (E) states that the dull companion uncovers
misleading clues. This is incorrect; the interpretation of the clues is
misleading, not the clues themselves.
_________________

Compilation of Blogs by Mike Mcgarry - Magoosh

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jun 2017
Posts: 1
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Sep 2017, 18:33
Can an expert please explain what should be the answer to this question and why ?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 10 Aug 2017
Posts: 19
GMAT 1: 720 Q48 V41
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2017, 01:34
Came down to A & C.
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.

Almost fell for A, as the stem starts with:
" Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion."
While mystery stories feature brilliant detectives, 'most' is a perilous word here IMO.

For C, "Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution." this part indicates that 'sometimes' there are enough clues for readers to correctly solve the mystery.

Answer: C.

Edit:
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
stem says nothing about how readers may solve the mystery in a story.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
the question stem says that the dull companion acts as a distractor, but doesn't make any statement about the brilliant detective being a distractor, nor does the stem say anything about it not being a distractor
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.
"the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution.'... so the dull companion simply misinterpreted the clues to arrive at a wrong conclusion, not by uncovering misleading clues

Akshat798 I am by no means an expert, but this is how I did it - just tagging you since it's been few days since you posted. Hope it helps!
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Oct 2016
Posts: 10
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2017, 01:49
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
IMO (C) can't be correct because it says "some mystery stories" while the passage says "Mystery stories often", which would mean 'most stories' not 'some stories'. I'll go with (B).
Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 7934
Location: Pune, India
Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2017, 02:13
Sebastian Shoaib wrote:
IMO (C) can't be correct because it says "some mystery stories" while the passage says "Mystery stories often", which would mean 'most stories' not 'some stories'. I'll go with (B).


If something is true for many mystery stories, it is certainly true for "some". Also, "some" means "at least one".
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Re: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the   [#permalink] 15 Sep 2017, 02:13

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   6    Next  [ 101 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.