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Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor

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Director
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Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2007, 14:27
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Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.

A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for

B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible

C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible

D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for

E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security which were largely their responsibility

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Ok, my question is when to use the 'gerund' form, what rules to follow?
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by nguyendinhtuong on 30 May 2017, 21:37, edited 2 times in total.
Reformatted question
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2007, 14:43
Quote:
Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought
recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust
to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social
security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.

A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for
B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for
E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security which were largely their responsibility


The answer is B.

C, D & E can be eliminated because they use the gerund (taking) instead of the to-infinitive form (to take).

A can be eliminated because in the phrase '...that were in large measure what they had been responsible for...', 'they' is ambiguous and seems to refer to the 'others of the Roosevelt brain trust'.

You're left with B.

Here's a link to a website explaining the grammatical use of a gerund.

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/g_verbals.html
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2007, 21:29
alimad wrote:
Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought
recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust
to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social
security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.


A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for
B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for
E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security which were largely their responsibility

Ok, my question is when to use the 'gerund' form, what rules to follow?


B.

"taking" vs. to take. to take is needed b/c the first lady and the secretary allowed others to take, not taking.

Elim CDE.

A: they has no clear referent. could be the others or the two women.

B: fixes A's problem with referents.
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2008, 05:28
Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.

A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for
B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for
E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security which were largely their responsibility
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2008, 08:32
Please Underline SC Questions.
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2008, 09:45
IMO :A
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2008, 13:03
"atletikos" if you don't mind can you please underline the SC questions?
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2008, 13:06
A
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2008, 21:24
B.

'They' in A... could refer to the women or the Roosevelt brain trust.
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2008, 22:39
grrr... going with B

in A I don't like the structure, to awkward for my esl liking :):

allowed to take credit for programs that were what they
also, do we really need to use "had been" here?

atletikos wrote:
Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought
recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust
to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social
security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.

A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for
B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for
E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security which were largely their responsibility
Senior Manager
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2008, 15:53
B ....
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2008, 21:39
atletikos wrote:
Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.

A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for
B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for
E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security which were largely their responsibility


Also B for correct referent.

A: they is ambigious
B: "the two women" correctly refers to "Eleanor Roosevelt & Frances Perkins".
C, D and E: all have taking, which doesnot fit in the sentence. "to take" is better.
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Director
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2008, 22:16
will go with B......

brain trust should follow with "to take" instead of taking so cde out, "they" is confusing in A and "the two women" is specific in B

So B.

what is OA
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2008, 00:19
Good job guys :-D

OA is B
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2008, 05:00
i read somewhere that comma is required before which ...thus discarded choice B ...
pls explain !!
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2008, 06:42
tenaman10 wrote:
i read somewhere that comma is required before which ...thus discarded choice B ...
pls explain !!


With relative clause (who, which, that), when a comma is used (not required), it means that the relative clause provides extra information about the main clause and you can eliminate it without affecting the meaning of the sentence. However, without a comma before which, you cannot delete the relative clause because in this case the relative clause is required.
For example, "I went to see my Uncle Brown, who lives in New York." In this case, "who" modifies "Uncle Brown". With the comma before "who", you can understand that I have only one Uncle Brown, and the relative clause "who lives in New York" provides extra information about Uncle BRown but it can be eliminated.
However, with "I went to see my Uncle Brown who lives in New York" is a bit different. Without a comma, the relative clause is necessary because it infers that I have more than 1 Uncle Brown and the Uncle Brown I am talking here is the one who lives in NY (not the one who lives in CA, for example).
Hope this helps.
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2008, 09:24
nganle08 wrote:
tenaman10 wrote:
i read somewhere that comma is required before which ...thus discarded choice B ...
pls explain !!


With relative clause (who, which, that), when a comma is used (not required), it means that the relative clause provides extra information about the main clause and you can eliminate it without affecting the meaning of the sentence. However, without a comma before which, you cannot delete the relative clause because in this case the relative clause is required.
For example, "I went to see my Uncle Brown, who lives in New York." In this case, "who" modifies "Uncle Brown". With the comma before "who", you can understand that I have only one Uncle Brown, and the relative clause "who lives in New York" provides extra information about Uncle BRown but it can be eliminated.
However, with "I went to see my Uncle Brown who lives in New York" is a bit different. Without a comma, the relative clause is necessary because it infers that I have more than 1 Uncle Brown and the Uncle Brown I am talking here is the one who lives in NY (not the one who lives in CA, for example).
Hope this helps.


nice info
was just curious to ask whether we can have a comma before that
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 26 Nov 2008, 22:43
hibloom wrote:

However, without a comma before which, you cannot delete the relative clause because in this case the relative clause is required.


[/quote]

pronoun Which is a nonrestrictive pronoun meaning that what follows Which is not necessary to identify the subject i.e. Which must be preceded with a comma. always. at least on GMAT.
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 26 Nov 2008, 23:57
B
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2010, 21:57
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Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought
recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.
A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for
B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for
E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security which were largely their responsibility

Can anybody explain why B wins over A ? What is the role 'for which' is playing?
Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor   [#permalink] 12 Jan 2010, 21:57

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