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Neuroscientists distinguish organic amnesia, which has some

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Re: Neuroscientists distinguish organic amnesia, which has some  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2018, 03:52
1
Correct Idiom : " distinguish between A and B "
Answer : D
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New post 11 Oct 2018, 16:03
On GMAT if A is grammatically correct then that is the correct answer, preference is secondary.

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Re: Neuroscientists distinguish organic amnesia, which has some  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2019, 23:22
‘distinguish…from’ is not the right idiomatic form. It should be ‘distinguish…between’. A is out.
B is correct but its also very wordy, so let’s wait and see.
C has a pronoun issue. ‘They’ doesn’t have a clear antecedent.
E’s structure is not parallel. Organic amnesia is described by a condition within which something occurs and psychological amnesia is described as a condition that IS something.

D is error free and more concise than B, so it is the correct answer.
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Re: Neuroscientists distinguish organic amnesia, which has some  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2019, 11:27
Hi, I was wondering what is wrong with choice A, we have a correct usage of the idiom distinguish x from y, and the compared elements are correctly structured why should we prefer D, would gmat actually favor one type of idiom over other without giving any other clue? so distinguish between x and y > distinguish x from y?
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Re: Neuroscientists distinguish organic amnesia, which has some  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2019, 13:18
This has always been a long standing debate on idioms. We can solve this by a logical approach.

Distinguish X from Y is used when you have to distinguish between two familiar group and take 'Y' as a sub group from 'X'.
For eg: Distinguish good apples from apples. Or in this case Organic amnesia from Amnesia in general.

Distinguish between X and Y is used when you have two different entities to differentiate. Which coincidentally turns up most often on the GMAT.

for eg: distinguish between good apples and bad apples. In this organic amnesia and poly amnesia are two different things.

Do not blindly take the latter as the correct idiom over the former. Both of them have subtle differences with respect to the meaning of the sentence.

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Re: Neuroscientists distinguish organic amnesia, which has some  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jul 2019, 12:11
I chose E instead of D because of the reasoning that "which has" is present perfect while "which is" is present tense. However, I failed to realize that for "has" to become a helping verb, we need to have a participle form for "cause". So, it is acting as a present tense verb and thus Option D is the only one left.
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Re: Neuroscientists distinguish organic amnesia, which has some  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2019, 00:25
The first modifier in E also has some problems that others didn't mention:

1) We can't say that some cause exists "in" organic amnesia. We'd need to say "FOR which some cause exists."
2) It's odd to put "such as" after a verb. Since we want "such as" to provide an example of a cause, it makes more sense to have it following the word "cause," as in D.
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Re: Neuroscientists distinguish organic amnesia, which has some   [#permalink] 31 Jul 2019, 00:25

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