It is currently 24 Nov 2017, 06:21

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Expert Post
53 KUDOS received
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 42356

Kudos [?]: 133204 [53], given: 12439

NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jan 2012, 03:03
53
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
296
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Exponents and roots problems are very common on the GMAT. So, it's extremely important to know how to manipulate them, how to factor out, take roots, multiply, divide, etc. Below are 11 problems to test your skills. Please post your thought process/solutions along with the answers.

I'll post OA's with detailed solutions tomorrow. Good luck.


1. What is the value of \(\sqrt{25+10\sqrt{6}}+\sqrt{25-10\sqrt{6}}\)?
A. \(2\sqrt{5}\)
B. \(\sqrt{55}\)
C. \(2\sqrt{15}\)
D. 50
E. 60

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029216

2. What is the units digit of \((17^3)^4-1973^{3^2}\)?
A. 0
B. 2
C. 4
D. 6
E. 8

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029219

3. If \(5^{10x}=4,900\) and \(2^{\sqrt{y}}=25\) what is the value of \(\frac{(5^{(x-1)})^5}{4^{-\sqrt{y}}}\)?
A. 14/5
B. 5
C. 28/5
D. 13
E. 14

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029221

4. What is the value of \(5+4*5+4*5^2+4*5^3+4*5^4+4*5^5\)?
A. 5^6
B. 5^7
C. 5^8
D. 5^9
E. 5^10

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029222

5. If \(x=23^2*25^4*27^6*29^8\) and is a multiple of \(26^n\), where \(n\) is a non-negative integer, then what is the value of \(n^{26}-26^n\)?
A. -26
B. -25
C. -1
D. 0
E. 1

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029223

6. If \(x=\sqrt[5]{-37}\) then which of the following must be true?
A. \(\sqrt{-x}>2\)
B. x>-2
C. x^2<4
D. x^3<-8
E. x^4>32

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029224

7. If \(x=\sqrt{10}+\sqrt[3]{9}+\sqrt[4]{8}+\sqrt[5]{7}+\sqrt[6]{6}+\sqrt[7]{5}+\sqrt[8]{4}+\sqrt[9]{3}+\sqrt[10]{2}\), then which of the following must be true:
A. x<6
B. 6<x<8
C. 8<x<10
D. 10<x<12
E. x>12

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029227

8. If \(x\) is a positive number and equals to \(\sqrt{6+{\sqrt{6+\sqrt{6+\sqrt{6+...}}}}}\), where the given expression extends to an infinite number of roots, then what is the value of x?
A. \(\sqrt{6}\)
B. 3
C. \(1+\sqrt{6}\)
D. \(2\sqrt{3}\)
E. 6

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029228

9. If \(x\) is a positive integer then the value of \(\frac{22^{22x}-22^{2x}}{11^{11x}-11^x}\) is closest to which of the following?
A. \(2^{11x}\)
B. \(11^{11x}\)
C. \(22^{11x}\)
D. \(2^{22x}*11^{11x}\)
E. \(2^{22x}*11^{22x}\)

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029229

10. Given that \(5x=125-3y+z\) and \(\sqrt{5x}-5-\sqrt{z-3y}=0\), then what is the value of \(\sqrt{\frac{45(z-3y)}{x}}\)?
A. 5
B. 10
C. 15
D. 20
E. Can not be determined

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029231

11. If \(x>0\), \(x^2=2^{64}\) and \(x^x=2^y\) then what is the value of \(y\)?
A. 2
B. 2^(11)
C. 2^(32)
D. 2^(37)
E. 2^(64)

Solution: tough-and-tricky-exponents-and-roots-questions-125956-40.html#p1029232
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Kudos [?]: 133204 [53], given: 12439

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Status: love the club...
Joined: 24 Mar 2015
Posts: 203

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 453

NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Sep 2017, 03:30
Bunuel wrote:
5. If \(x=23^2*25^4*27^6*29^8\) and is a multiple of \(26^n\), where \(n\) is a non-negative integer, then what is the value of \(n^{26}-26^n\)?
A. -26
B. -25
C. -1
D. 0
E. 1

\(23^2*25^4*27^6*29^8=odd*odd*odd*odd=odd\) so \(x\) is an odd number. The only way it to be a multiple of \(26^n\) (even number in integer power) is when \(n=0\), in this case \(26^n=26^0=1\) and 1 is a factor of every integer. Thus \(n=0\) --> \(n^{26}-26^n=0^{26}-26^0=0-1=-1\). Must know for the GMAT: \(a^0=1\), for \(a\neq{0}\) - any nonzero number to the power of 0 is 1. Important note: the case of 0^0 is not tested on the GMAT.

Answer: C.


hi man

26^n is a multiple of an odd number, this is only possible when n = 0, but why?, yes it can be equal to zero, but "n" can also be a non-negative irrational number... :(

Is this because the base to which the power "n" is raised is even or anything else ...?
please say to me.

thanks in advance, man

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 453

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 42356

Kudos [?]: 133204 [0], given: 12439

Re: NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Sep 2017, 03:34
gmatcracker2017 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
5. If \(x=23^2*25^4*27^6*29^8\) and is a multiple of \(26^n\),where \(n\) is a non-negative integer, then what is the value of \(n^{26}-26^n\)?
A. -26
B. -25
C. -1
D. 0
E. 1

\(23^2*25^4*27^6*29^8=odd*odd*odd*odd=odd\) so \(x\) is an odd number. The only way it to be a multiple of \(26^n\) (even number in integer power) is when \(n=0\), in this case \(26^n=26^0=1\) and 1 is a factor of every integer. Thus \(n=0\) --> \(n^{26}-26^n=0^{26}-26^0=0-1=-1\). Must know for the GMAT: \(a^0=1\), for \(a\neq{0}\) - any nonzero number to the power of 0 is 1. Important note: the case of 0^0 is not tested on the GMAT.

Answer: C.


hi man

26^n is a multiple of an odd number, this is only possible when n = 0, but why?, yes it can be equal to zero, but "n" can also be a non-negative irrational number... :(

thanks in advance, man


Check the highlighted part.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Kudos [?]: 133204 [0], given: 12439

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Status: love the club...
Joined: 24 Mar 2015
Posts: 203

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 453

Re: NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Sep 2017, 03:42
Bunuel wrote:
gmatcracker2017 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
5. If \(x=23^2*25^4*27^6*29^8\) and is a multiple of \(26^n\),where \(n\) is a non-negative integer, then what is the value of \(n^{26}-26^n\)?
A. -26
B. -25
C. -1
D. 0
E. 1

\(23^2*25^4*27^6*29^8=odd*odd*odd*odd=odd\) so \(x\) is an odd number. The only way it to be a multiple of \(26^n\) (even number in integer power) is when \(n=0\), in this case \(26^n=26^0=1\) and 1 is a factor of every integer. Thus \(n=0\) --> \(n^{26}-26^n=0^{26}-26^0=0-1=-1\). Must know for the GMAT: \(a^0=1\), for \(a\neq{0}\) - any nonzero number to the power of 0 is 1. Important note: the case of 0^0 is not tested on the GMAT.

Answer: C.


hi man

26^n is a multiple of an odd number, this is only possible when n = 0, but why?, yes it can be equal to zero, but "n" can also be a non-negative irrational number... :(

thanks in advance, man


Check the highlighted part.


oh! man
I got it

thanks a lot man

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 453

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Sep 2017
Posts: 4

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 9

CAT Tests
Re: NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Oct 2017, 17:16
Bunuel wrote:
SOLUTIONS:

1. What is the value of \(\sqrt{25+10\sqrt{6}}+\sqrt{25-10\sqrt{6}}\)?
A. \(2\sqrt{5}\)
B. \(\sqrt{55}\)
C. \(2\sqrt{15}\)
D. 50
E. 60

Square the given expression to get rid of the roots, though don't forget to un-square the value you get at the end to balance this operation and obtain the right answer:

Must know fro the GMAT: \((x+y)^2=x^2+2xy+y^2\) (while \((x-y)^2=x^2-2xy+y^2\)).

So we get: \((\sqrt{25+10\sqrt{6}}+\sqrt{25-10\sqrt{6}})^2=(\sqrt{25+10\sqrt{6}})^2+2(\sqrt{25+10\sqrt{6}})(\sqrt{25-10\sqrt{6}})+(\sqrt{25-10\sqrt{6}})^2=\)
\(=(25+10\sqrt{6})+2(\sqrt{25+10\sqrt{6}})(\sqrt{25-10\sqrt{6}})+(25-10\sqrt{6})\).

Note that sum of the first and the third terms simplifies to \((25+10\sqrt{6})+(25-10\sqrt{6})=50\), so we have \(50+2(\sqrt{25+10\sqrt{6}})(\sqrt{25-10\sqrt{6}})\) --> \(50+2(\sqrt{25+10\sqrt{6}})(\sqrt{25-10\sqrt{6}})=50+2\sqrt{(25+10\sqrt{6})(25-10\sqrt{6})}\).

Also must know for the GMAT: \((x+y)(x-y)=x^2-y^2\), thus \(50+2\sqrt{(25+10\sqrt{6})(25-10\sqrt{6})}=50+2\sqrt{25^2-(10\sqrt{6})^2)}=50+2\sqrt{625-600}=50+2\sqrt{25}=60\).

Recall that we should un-square this value to get the right the answer: \(\sqrt{60}=2\sqrt{15}\).

Answer: C.



Hi Bunuel

I found it easier to do the ''math''
6^1/2 = 2,45 (just know by heart)

So first term would be 25+10*2,45 = a little bit more than 49, so the square root is 7,something small
Second term would be 25-10*2,45 = almost 1, just considered 1, and than the square root = 1

little bit more than 7 - 1 -> answer should be something close to 6

A: 2 * square root(5) = 2*2,43 , not close to 6
B: Sroot(55) = bigger than 7
C: Looks good
D: No way
E: No way

Choice is C.

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 9

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 30 Oct 2016
Posts: 53

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 8

Location: Canada
Schools: HBS '20, Kellogg '20
Re: NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Nov 2017, 14:46
Bunuel wrote:
2. What is the units digit of \((17^3)^4-1973^{3^2}\)?
A. 0
B. 2
C. 4
D. 6
E. 8

Must know for the GMAT:
I. The units digit of \((abc)^n\) is the same as that of \(c^n\), which means that the units digit of \((17^3)^4\) is that same as that of \((7^3)^4\) and the units digit of \(1973^{3^2}\) is that same as that of \(3^{3^2}\).

II. If exponentiation is indicated by stacked symbols, the rule is to work from the top down, thus:
\(a^m^n=a^{(m^n)}\) and not \((a^m)^n\), which on the other hand equals to \(a^{mn}\).

So:
\((a^m)^n=a^{mn}\);

\(a^m^n=a^{(m^n)}\).

Thus, \((7^3)^4=7^{(3*4)}=7^{12}\) and \(3^{3^2}=3^{(3^2)}=3^9\).

III. The units digit of integers in positive integer power repeats in specific pattern (cyclicity): The units digit of 7 and 3 in positive integer power repeats in patterns of 4:

1. 7^1=7 (last digit is 7)
2. 7^2=9 (last digit is 9)
3. 7^3=3 (last digit is 3)
4. 7^4=1 (last digit is 1)

5. 7^5=7 (last digit is 7 again!)
...

1. 3^1=3 (last digit is 3)
2. 3^2=9 (last digit is 9)
3. 3^3=27 (last digit is 7)
4. 3^4=81 (last digit is 1)

5. 3^5=243 (last digit is 3 again!)
...

Thus th units digit of \(7^{12}\) will be 1 (4th in pattern, as 12 is a multiple of cyclicty number 4) and the units digit of \(3^9\) will be 3 (first in pattern, as 9=4*2+1).

So, we have that the units digit of \((17^3)^4=17^{12}\) is 1 and the units digit of \(1973^3^2=1973^9\) is 3. Also notice that the second number is much larger then the first one, thus their difference will be negative, something like 11-13=-2, which gives the final answer that the units digit of \((17^3)^4-1973^{3^2}\) is 2.

Answer B.


I don't understand the last step why is it not 11-3? which =7?

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 8

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 42356

Kudos [?]: 133204 [0], given: 12439

Re: NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Nov 2017, 21:20
arcticTO wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
2. What is the units digit of \((17^3)^4-1973^{3^2}\)?
A. 0
B. 2
C. 4
D. 6
E. 8

Must know for the GMAT:
I. The units digit of \((abc)^n\) is the same as that of \(c^n\), which means that the units digit of \((17^3)^4\) is that same as that of \((7^3)^4\) and the units digit of \(1973^{3^2}\) is that same as that of \(3^{3^2}\).

II. If exponentiation is indicated by stacked symbols, the rule is to work from the top down, thus:
\(a^m^n=a^{(m^n)}\) and not \((a^m)^n\), which on the other hand equals to \(a^{mn}\).

So:
\((a^m)^n=a^{mn}\);

\(a^m^n=a^{(m^n)}\).

Thus, \((7^3)^4=7^{(3*4)}=7^{12}\) and \(3^{3^2}=3^{(3^2)}=3^9\).

III. The units digit of integers in positive integer power repeats in specific pattern (cyclicity): The units digit of 7 and 3 in positive integer power repeats in patterns of 4:

1. 7^1=7 (last digit is 7)
2. 7^2=9 (last digit is 9)
3. 7^3=3 (last digit is 3)
4. 7^4=1 (last digit is 1)

5. 7^5=7 (last digit is 7 again!)
...

1. 3^1=3 (last digit is 3)
2. 3^2=9 (last digit is 9)
3. 3^3=27 (last digit is 7)
4. 3^4=81 (last digit is 1)

5. 3^5=243 (last digit is 3 again!)
...

Thus th units digit of \(7^{12}\) will be 1 (4th in pattern, as 12 is a multiple of cyclicty number 4) and the units digit of \(3^9\) will be 3 (first in pattern, as 9=4*2+1).

So, we have that the units digit of \((17^3)^4=17^{12}\) is 1 and the units digit of \(1973^3^2=1973^9\) is 3. Also notice that the second number is much larger then the first one, thus their difference will be negative, something like 11-13=-2, which gives the final answer that the units digit of \((17^3)^4-1973^{3^2}\) is 2.

Answer B.


I don't understand the last step why is it not 11-3? which =7?


Please re-read the highlighted part.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Kudos [?]: 133204 [0], given: 12439

Re: NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions   [#permalink] 08 Nov 2017, 21:20

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   [ 186 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

NEW!!! Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.