It is currently 19 Feb 2018, 02:25

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

None of the attempts to specify the causes of crime explains why most

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Jun 2017
Posts: 243
Re: None of the attempts to specify the causes of crime explains why most [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Jan 2018, 20:30
Vithal wrote:
None of the attempts to specify the causes of crime explains why most of the people exposed to the alleged causes do not commit crimes and, conversely, why so many of those not so exposed have.

(A) have
(B) has
(C) shall
(D) do
(E) could


ellipsis rule is
if the latter part contains is/are, the first part must have a form of to be
if the latter part contain do/did, the first part must have action verb
if the latter part contains helping verb, the first part must contain the same helping verb which maybe is in different tesnse.
Expert Post
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
B
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 241
Re: None of the attempts to specify the causes of crime explains why most [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Jan 2018, 15:33
Hi Vithal,

Thank you for your question. While this sentence is long-winded, a quick read-through shows that this is a simple comparison between two groups: people who do not commit crimes, and those who do (hint: I just gave away the answer!).

To determine which answer is correct, let’s look at how each of the answers would change the meaning of the sentence:

A: have
“Have” only considers those who committed crimes in the past, not the present. Since we’re comparing those who “do not” commit crimes, which is present tense, the other side should be in present tense too.

B: has
“Has” is a singular verb that doesn’t agree with the plural word it’s referring to (those). It also suggests comparing past crimes and present.

C: shall
“Shall” means they are comparing present tense with future tense, which isn’t parallel.

D: do
“Do” is correct! It uses parallel structure (do not commit crimes…those who do) and both are in present tense.

E: could
“Could” changes the meaning from discussing people who DO commit crimes with people who MIGHT, which is different.

So if we look at parallel structure (do not / do) and consistent verb tense, D is the clear winner!
_________________

"Students study. GMAT assassins train."
Image

★★★★★ GMAT Club Verified Reviews for EMPOWERgmat & Special Discount

GMAT Club Verbal Advantage EMPOWERgmat Critical Reasoning Question Pack

Re: None of the attempts to specify the causes of crime explains why most   [#permalink] 31 Jan 2018, 15:33

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   [ 82 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

None of the attempts to specify the causes of crime explains why most

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.