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One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s

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One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2016, 22:30
1
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A
B
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D
E

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  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

66% (02:35) correct 34% (02:20) wrong based on 158 sessions

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One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right square is n. What is the area of a middle square, in terms of m and n?
A. m^2+n^2
B.m^2-n^2
C. m+n^2
D. m^2+n
E. m+n

*An answer will be posted in 2 days.

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One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2016, 00:03
2
What an interesting question!

I would approach it in the following way, I hope someone finds it useful. Please refer to the attached image for reference.

We know that
ΔCDG: CD=BA=m, ∠CDF = 90° & CG = CF
ΔFHG: FH=IK=n, ∠FHG = 90° & CG = CF

Now we know that:
CG = CF = m * DG = n * GH

Since both hypothenuses of those two right triangles are equal, we can conclude that they both must have the same lenghts of two legs of a right triangle, thus
CD = GH = m
FH = DG = n

No we can find the side of a square CEFG, which is CG = FG = \(\sqrt{{m^2 + n^2}}\)
The area of the square will equal to CG * FG =\(m^2 + n^2\)

Answer:
A
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2016, 16:55
For this question, you have to utilize the Pythagorean Theorem twice. Then, the answer becomes A.
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2016, 08:38
Did not follow your explanation.You have made some mistakes which I have highlighted and also I couldn't understand as to whyCG=GF=m*DG=n*GH

fantaisie wrote:
What an interesting question!

I would approach it in the following way, I hope someone finds it useful. Please refer to the attached image for reference.

We know that
ΔCDG: CD=BA=m, ∠CDF = 90° & CG = CF
ΔFHG: FH=IK=n, ∠FHG = 90° & CG = CF

Now we know that:
CG = CF = m * DG = n * GH

Since both hypothenuses of those two right triangles are equal, we can conclude that they both must have the same lenghts of two legs of a right triangle, thus
CD = GH = m
FH = DG = n

No we can find the side of a square CEFG, which is CG = FG = \(\sqrt{{m^2 + n^2}}\)
The area of the square will equal to CG * FG =\(m^2 + n^2\)

Answer:
A
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2016, 00:38
MathRevolution wrote:
For this question, you have to utilize the Pythagorean Theorem twice. Then, the answer becomes A.


Can you please explain how A is the answer.
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2016, 23:47
How can CG = CF. CG is side of a Square and CF is diagonal. They can never be equal. Can you please explain.

fantaisie wrote:
What an interesting question!

I would approach it in the following way, I hope someone finds it useful. Please refer to the attached image for reference.

We know that
ΔCDG: CD=BA=m, ∠CDF = 90° & CG = CF
ΔFHG: FH=IK=n, ∠FHG = 90° & CG = CF

Now we know that:
CG = CF = m * DG = n * GH

Since both hypothenuses of those two right triangles are equal, we can conclude that they both must have the same lenghts of two legs of a right triangle, thus
CD = GH = m
FH = DG = n

No we can find the side of a square CEFG, which is CG = FG = \(\sqrt{{m^2 + n^2}}\)
The area of the square will equal to CG * FG =\(m^2 + n^2\)

Answer:
A
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jun 2016, 20:50
atomicmass wrote:
MathRevolution wrote:
For this question, you have to utilize the Pythagorean Theorem twice. Then, the answer becomes A.


Can you please explain how A is the answer.



Thank you for the question! Please refer to the attachment.
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One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2016, 20:23
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:shock: There is no way I could have solved this in 2 mins :shock:
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2016, 23:23
This question can actually become very easy.
The trick on these geometry questions is that you can assume things to your convenience, as long as it does not violate any of the conditions on the question.
We can easily assume m=n, we don't violate any conditions on the qus. The answer is pretty straightforward then.
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One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Oct 2016, 06:44
One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right square is n. What is the area of a middle square, in terms of m and n?

Please refer the attached diagram.
Given that \(BC = m\) and \(EH = n\)

To solve this question use the fact that middle figure is also square. => BJ = JH => \(CJ = n\) and \(JE = m\).

Hence, \(BJ = \sqrt{m^{2} + n^{2}}\) and area of middle square = \({m^{2} + n^{2}\)
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2016, 11:46
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The simplest way to solve this question is to assume the base angle in left right angled triangle as x. Since angle in square is 90deg. So the base angle in the right triangle is 90-x. Now(for left triangle) sin(90-x)=cosx = m/a and (for right triangle) sin x=n/a. Now use cos^2 x + sin^2 x =1. And you have result without Pythagoras theorem.
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2017, 19:01
ganand wrote:
One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right square is n. What is the area of a middle square, in terms of m and n?

Please refer the attached diagram.
Given that \(BC = m\) and \(EH = n\)

To solve this question use the fact that middle figure is also square. => BJ = JH => \(CJ = n\) and \(JE = m\).

Hence, \(BJ = \sqrt{m^{2} + n^{2}}\) and area of middle square = \({m^{2} + n^{2}\)



Hi,

Can someone please explain how did we go from BJ = CJ to CJ = n and JE = m ?
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2017, 07:29
is that because the two triangles are congruent ?
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2017, 15:21
I don't understand how CG=CF?
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2017, 03:22
Can anybody share a simple solution to this problem
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2017, 09:18
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Based on the diagram- m^2 < n^2. Hence eliminate option B.
In all the other options the dimensions are not correct- meaning- area has to be of the form (length)^2. None of the other options are of that form (you can't do m + n^2 or n + m^2, it's like adding 1 metre and 1 sq.metre)

Hence answer has to be Option A.

Using this method you can solve this in 20 seconds max.
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2018, 21:03
My approach.
Name LHS Triangle as ABC with B as 90 deg and RHS Triangle as EDC with angle D as 90 deg.
In LHS triangle ABC
Angle B= 90 deg, Assume angle ACB=x, then angle BAC=90-x. -------------(1)
Angle ACE = 90 deg which means angle ECD = 90-x (Angles ACB, ACE and ECD add up to 180 deg). -------------(2)
Now RHS triangle EDC,
Angle D = 90 deg, angle ECD = 90-x and angle CED = x -------------------(3)
From (1) & (2), triangles ABC and EDC are similar triangles.
AC/BC = CE/ED
a/BC=a/n, BC = n.
Also, AC^2 = AB^2+BC^2, a^2 = m^2+n^2. And we know that a^2 is the area of the middle square. So Area of the middle square is m^2+n^2.
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2018, 22:10
phoenix128 wrote:
Based on the diagram- m^2 < n^2. Hence eliminate option B.
In all the other options the dimensions are not correct- meaning- area has to be of the form (length)^2. None of the other options are of that form (you can't do m + n^2 or n + m^2, it's like adding 1 metre and 1 sq.metre)

Hence answer has to be Option A.

Using this method you can solve this in 20 seconds max.


Brilliant solution, i tried using Pytha and got lost... then tried to make it easier by assuming M = N and viola got the answer..
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Re: One side length of a left square is m and one side length of a right s &nbs [#permalink] 02 Sep 2018, 22:10
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