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Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara

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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2010, 10:17
Eden wrote:
" it does not read" -I think it refers to the quality of the book. Basically, it is saying that the book is of higher quality than that of novice writers. It doesn't have the "flavor" or the "feel" of books written by new writers. "it" refers to "the book". "read" here is a verb. " does not" is used to negate the sentence.
Think of it this way:
The rose smells good-rose does not smell, rather it is being smelled
The cars sell very well- cars do not sell, rather they are being sold
It (the book) does not read...- well, the book obviously does not read, rather it is read by someone.

so, the main point is that " it does not read" qualifies the book as being superior to the book of apprentice writers.


ok, thanks.
I am not familiar with those type of constructions..
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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2011, 10:42
This sentence has been taken from an article in NYTimes. You can find the article below:
http://www.nytimes.com/1983/08/05/arts/no-headline-079566.html

This strengthen the fact that reading good publication does help a lot.
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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2014, 08:29
why E is wrong.

"but" in E is correct because it is used to contrast two things not to contrast between " do " and "dose not"

I learn english well but learn French badly

we do not need "do not" in the second clause to use "but" we need only the opposite meaning

why E is wrong? expert, pls come in
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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2017, 22:29
if there would have been an option-"does not read as an apprentice work does", would it be correct?
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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2017, 02:54
akshay_kuchhal wrote:
if there would have been an option-"does not read as an apprentice work does", would it be correct?


Yes, it would be alright.

Note: Your sentence is though grammatically incorrect.. should have been: if there were an option, would it be correct ?(unlikely future) OR if there had been an option, would it have been correct ?(past that never happened).
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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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Explanation from e-gmat blog: https://e-gmat.com/blogs/originally-pub ... 6gmatprep/

WHAT DOES THE SENTENCE MEAN?

This sentence talks about the first novel of Barbara Pym. Its title is Some Tame Gazelle. It was published in 1950. The author states that even though this was her first novel, it does not read like a work of someone who just started writing – an apprentice.What are the errors in the original sentence?The original choice has no errors. It is grammatically correct sentence that conveys logical meaning.

ANSWER CHOICE ANALYSIS

Choice B – Meaning Error: This choice changes the intended meaning of the sentence. The author per original choice is certain that this novel does not read like a beginner’s work. This is regardless of who reads the book. But this choice by using the word “seems” communicates a sense that to the author this novel does not to read like a beginner’s work. But if someone else reads this novel, he/she may consider it a beginner’s work.
Choice C – Meaning Error as in Choice B
Choice D – Idiom Error: This choice uses “like” to begin a clause. Per idiomatic usage, “like” cannot be used to start a clause. In contrast, “as” can be used to begin a clause.
Choice E – Meaning Error: This choice changes the intended meaning of the sentence. Consider the original sentence in its entirety. As we discussed above in the meaning analysis, this sentence states that even though this novel was the first work of the author, it does not read like a beginner’s work. The first part of the sentence and the use of “but” sets the context of this sentence. This sentence implies that the novel reads much better than an apprentice work.
Now lets review the meaning of the sentence per choice E. This choice states this first novel reads unlike an apprentice work. This implies that the novel may read worse than an apprentice work or it may read better than one. Thus, this sentence communicates different meaning from the intended meaning.

Thus, choice A is the correct answer.
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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2017, 11:44
Hi GMATNinja mikemcgarry,

Isn't the original sentence trying to compare action?
-- XYZ doesn't read as ABC does. --> Shouldn't this be the correct choice?

By saying that "XYZ doesn't read like ABC" we are comparing the nouns XYZ and ABC. Isn't this wrong?

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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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gmatexam439 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja mikemcgarry,

Isn't the original sentence trying to compare action?
-- XYZ doesn't read as ABC does. --> Shouldn't this be the correct choice?

By saying that "XYZ doesn't read like ABC" we are comparing the nouns XYZ and ABC. Isn't this wrong?

Regards.

Dear gmatexam439,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

The short answer to your question is no. This is very subtle and hard to explain.

There are some verbs in the English language that are "doing verbs." All the verbs that have a direct object are "doing verbs," as are many intransitive verbs, such as "to walk" or "to strive." The verb "to read," in its common and ordinary definition, is a verb that takes a direct object and is a "doing verb"--a person reads a book. That's an action, and if we were comparing that to some other reader, we would be comparing actions.

This sentence does NOT use the verb "to read" in its ordinary sense. Instead, it uses a very sophisticated secondary meaning of the word. The idiom is
the book reads [adjective]
Here, we are not describing an action: instead, this is a "being verb," a verb that speaks to the objects state of being. "Being verbs" at least sometimes are followed by adjectives, that describe how the object is. For example, consider this sentence.
The book was intended to be serious, but it reads funny.
Here, we are describing the book itself, not an action. Rather than a single-word adjective, we could have an adjectival phrase or clause, that is to say, a noun-modifying phrase or clause.

Well, the phrase "like [noun]" is a noun-modifying phrase, and this is precisely why we typically use this phrase to compare nouns. Thus, we can follow "read" in this sense with "like"--this is a very typical construction in sophisticated writing.
This short story reads like a novel.
That sentence is 100% correct. Again, absolutely no "action" is taking place in this sentence: the entire sentence is describing the "being" of the novel.

Much in the same way, here's the OA:
Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
This is an astonishingly elegant and sophisticated sentence, and what's brilliant about it is that some less sophisticated readers, especially non-native speakers following simple rules, will be completely puzzled by it. This is exactly the sort of sentence that the GMAT loves.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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New post 01 Dec 2017, 11:17
Dear mikemcgarry,

Thank you for the explanation, but could you give some pointers about how can we infer whether a sentence is comparing action or noun?

There can be 2 grammatically correct choices such as "X plays as Y does" and "X plays like Y". How can we pick the correct choice between the given 2. Is there any rule for this? If not, could you please point out a good source that will help me in improving my understanding of the topic.

Regards
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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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gmatexam439 wrote:
Dear mikemcgarry,

Thank you for the explanation, but could you give some pointers about how can we infer whether a sentence is comparing action or noun?

There can be 2 grammatically correct choices such as "X plays as Y does" and "X plays like Y". How can we pick the correct choice between the given 2. Is there any rule for this? If not, could you please point out a good source that will help me in improving my understanding of the topic.

Regards

Dear gmatexam439,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

You are correct that there often are two 100% grammatically correct ways to make a given comparison. You asked, "how can we infer whether a sentence is comparing action or noun?" That's a fantastic question, but your mistake is to assume that the answer to your question is a "rule." Many students, especially mathematically-talented non-native speakers, labor under the misconception that the path to GMAT SC mastery lies in some mythical complete collection of the "rules" of grammar and language. In fact, that is a complete chimera, and the rule-based approach to GMAT SC mastery is doomed to failure.

Let's talk about the brain for a moment. The cerebral cortex, the intellectual "thinking" part of the brain, has two halves, called hemispheres. The left hemisphere, or left-brain, is very logical-based and rule-based; it is linear, organized, and precise. The left-brain is very good at "differentiation," the process of telling the difference between two closely related things. Computers can easily do most right-brain rule based tasks. The left brain thinks in terms of clear, logical, step-by-step thought. The right hemisphere, or right brain, is the world's best pattern-matching machine: it matched verbal patterns, spatial patterns, emotional patterns, etc. The left-brain is very good at "integration," the process of seeing the overarching pattern that binds separate things together. The right hemisphere is involved in facial recognition, voice recognition, etc.--tasks that still are an enormous challenge for computers to master. The right brain is responsible for dreaming; it is used to appreciate poetry and for the capacity of imagination.

Many tasks use both brains. In math, the right-brain is used in something like algebra, which is very rule-based, and also differential calculus; the left-brain is used in the pattern-matching needed in integral calculus, as well as aspects of geometry and topology. In language, the clear rules of grammar, such as SVA, are covered by the right-brain, but the left-brain handles much of rhetorical construction as well as a number of subtle questions of meaning. There are no rules for meaning. Meaning and interpretation are firmly in the province of the right-brain. A mathematically talented left-brain thinking might ask for clear, step-by-step rules, but there aren't any. You have to develop the left-brain skills to get at this side of language.

For more on the hemispheric differences, in mathematical context, see:
How to do GMAT Math Faster

Now, for a left-brain dominant mathematically talented non-native speaker, how does this individual develop right-brain skills, i.e. the intuition about emotional impact and meaning in language? I have two suggestions.

One is to develop a rigorous habit of reading. When you read, you will see and understand examples in context: this kind of learning in context builds intuition slowly, especially those subtle intuitions which never could be reified as a rule. See:
How to Improve Your GMAT Verbal Score

My other suggest is as follows. Search official question. If you find any in which you find it hard to tell whether the comparison is between nouns or verbs, then search for it on GMAT Club, add your question to the thread, and invite me to comment. It's through the discussion of individual concrete questions we can figure out what will help you understand this better.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 12:43
mikemcgarry wrote:
gmatexam439 wrote:
Dear mikemcgarry,

Thank you for the explanation, but could you give some pointers about how can we infer whether a sentence is comparing action or noun?

There can be 2 grammatically correct choices such as "X plays as Y does" and "X plays like Y". How can we pick the correct choice between the given 2. Is there any rule for this? If not, could you please point out a good source that will help me in improving my understanding of the topic.

Regards

Dear gmatexam439,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

You are correct that there often are two 100% grammatically correct ways to make a given comparison. You asked, "how can we infer whether a sentence is comparing action or noun?" That's a fantastic question, but your mistake is to assume that the answer to your question is a "rule." Many students, especially mathematically-talented non-native speakers, labor under the misconception that the path to GMAT SC mastery lies in some mythical complete collection of the "rules" of grammar and language. In fact, that is a complete chimera, and the rule-based approach to GMAT SC mastery is doomed to failure.

Let's talk about the brain for a moment. The cerebral cortex, the intellectual "thinking" part of the brain, has two halves, called hemispheres. The left hemisphere, or left-brain, is very logical-based and rule-based; it is linear, organized, and precise. The left-brain is very good at "differentiation," the process of telling the difference between two closely related things. Computers can easily do most right-brain rule based tasks. The left brain thinks in terms of clear, logical, step-by-step thought. The right hemisphere, or right brain, is the world's best pattern-matching machine: it matched verbal patterns, spatial patterns, emotional patterns, etc. The left-brain is very good at "integration," the process of seeing the overarching pattern that binds separate things together. The right hemisphere is involved in facial recognition, voice recognition, etc.--tasks that still are an enormous challenge for computers to master. The right brain is responsible for dreaming; it is used to appreciate poetry and for the capacity of imagination.

Many tasks use both brains. In math, the right-brain is used in something like algebra, which is very rule-based, and also differential calculus; the left-brain is used in the pattern-matching needed in integral calculus, as well as aspects of geometry and topology. In language, the clear rules of grammar, such as SVA, are covered by the right-brain, but the left-brain handles much of rhetorical construction as well as a number of subtle questions of meaning. There are no rules for meaning. Meaning and interpretation are firmly in the province of the right-brain. A mathematically talented left-brain thinking might ask for clear, step-by-step rules, but there aren't any. You have to develop the left-brain skills to get at this side of language.

For more on the hemispheric differences, in mathematical context, see:
How to do GMAT Math Faster

Now, for a left-brain dominant mathematically talented non-native speaker, how does this individual develop right-brain skills, i.e. the intuition about emotional impact and meaning in language? I have two suggestions.

One is to develop a rigorous habit of reading. When you read, you will see and understand examples in context: this kind of learning in context builds intuition slowly, especially those subtle intuitions which never could be reified as a rule. See:
How to Improve Your GMAT Verbal Score

My other suggest is as follows. Search official question. If you find any in which you find it hard to tell whether the comparison is between nouns or verbs, then search for it on GMAT Club, add your question to the thread, and invite me to comment. It's through the discussion of individual concrete questions we can figure out what will help you understand this better.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


hehe Thank you mikemcgarry :)

I will make sure to understand the meaning before jumping to the options. And, yes, I will definitely tag you in future in a thread that might confuse me.

Thank you for taking out time and explaining the essence of SC on GMAT :)

Regards
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Kudos if my post helps!

Helpful links:
1. Useful Formulae, Concepts and Tricks-Quant
2. e-GMAT's ALL SC Compilation
3. LSAT RC compilation
4. Actual LSAT CR collection by Broal
5. QOTD RC (Carcass)
6. Challange OG RC

Re: Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara   [#permalink] 04 Dec 2017, 12:43

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