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Our reading program teaches third graders to use phonics to

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Our reading program teaches third graders to use phonics to [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2012, 22:06
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Our reading program teaches third graders to use phonics to sound out multi-syllabic words by pronouncing prefixes and suffixes separately from base words, and then reading the word parts all together. Since children are still primarily reading aloud at this age, this approach ensures comprehension even in books that contain a high percentage of multi-syllabic words.

The approach of the summer reading program assumes which of the following about third graders’ comprehension of multi-syllabic words?

A. Students will recognize multi-syllabic words when they hear them.
B. Multi-syllabic words are all composed of prefixes and suffixes.
C. Third graders struggle more than other students with multi-syllabic words.
D. Comprehension is less important than sounding out words.
E. Other reading programs do not focus on multi-syllabic words.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Tough 700+ Level RCs: Passage1 | Passage2 | Passage3 | Passage4 | Passage5 | Passage6 | Passage7
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Re: CR: Third graders’ comprehension of multi-syllabic words [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2012, 07:37
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Good Afternoon. Here is how my brain worked through this problem:

Our reading program teaches third graders to use phonics to sound out multi-syllabic words by pronouncing prefixes and suffixes separately from base words, and then reading the word parts all together. Since children are still primarily reading aloud at this age, this approach ensures comprehension even in books that contain a high percentage of multi-syllabic words.

So no actual argument here, and a heck of a lot of very complicated vocab. Basically it seems to be about how 3rd graders are taught to read. Don't need to worry about too much more now.

The approach of the summer reading program assumes which of the following about third graders’ comprehension of multi-syllabic words?

So, in the passage there is an assumption. I've not read the passage in enough detail to know what that might be. So time to go through one by one....

A. Students will recognize multi-syllabic words when they hear them. This seems to be plausible. Reading the paragraph, it's not stated anywhere that students are taught to recognise multi-sylable words. Yet the approach is based on them being spotted and disected.
B. Multi-syllabic words are all composed of prefixes and suffixes.Seems wrong. Both from the context of the passage, but crucially from common sense - we know long words are not all made with prefixes and suffixes, it would be a crazy system if it assumed this.
C. Third graders struggle more than other students with multi-syllabic words. Not assumed anywhere. This is just how 3rd graders are taught, there is probably some truth that the young 3rd garders need to overcome this barrier before they can move up the ranks, but that's not said in the passage.[
D. Comprehension is less important than sounding out words. Just plain wrong. This passage is all about improving comprehension. Again common sense helps here - of course any reading course is going to be about learning what words mean not just saying them out loud.
E. Other reading programs do not focus on multi-syllabic words.In no way assumed. We have no reference to, or anything to tell us about other programmes. This is just a story about one programme

So overall quite tricky. Here is a good example of common sense really helping. Some of the suggestions were so perverse for a reading course that they were very likely to be wrong, even before analysis
_________________

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Last edited by plumber250 on 18 Nov 2012, 14:22, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: CR: Third graders’ comprehension of multi-syllabic words [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2012, 11:22
@plumber250: Very well explained with that strategy that worked perfectly!
+1 to you!
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Tough 700+ Level RCs: Passage1 | Passage2 | Passage3 | Passage4 | Passage5 | Passage6 | Passage7
Reading Comprehension notes: Click here
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Re: CR: Third graders’ comprehension of multi-syllabic words [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2013, 01:59
plumber250 wrote:
Good Afternoon. Here is how my brain worked through this problem:

Our reading program teaches third graders to use phonics to sound out multi-syllabic words by pronouncing prefixes and suffixes separately from base words, and then reading the word parts all together. Since children are still primarily reading aloud at this age, this approach ensures comprehension even in books that contain a high percentage of multi-syllabic words.

So no actual argument here, and a heck of a lot of very complicated vocab. Basically it seems to be about how 3rd graders are taught to read. Don't need to worry about too much more now.

The approach of the summer reading program assumes which of the following about third graders’ comprehension of multi-syllabic words?

So, in the passage there is an assumption. I've not read the passage in enough detail to know what that might be. So time to go through one by one....

A. Students will recognize multi-syllabic words when they hear them. This seems to be plausible. Reading the paragraph, it's not stated anywhere that students are taught to recognise multi-sylable words. Yet the approach is based on them being spotted and disected.
B. Multi-syllabic words are all composed of prefixes and suffixes.Seems wrong. Both from the context of the passage, but crucially from common sense - we know long words are not all made with prefixes and suffixes, it would be a crazy system if it assumed this.
C. Third graders struggle more than other students with multi-syllabic words. Not assumed anywhere. This is just how 3rd graders are taught, there is probably some truth that the young 3rd garders need to overcome this barrier before they can move up the ranks, but that's not said in the passage.[
D. Comprehension is less important than sounding out words. Just plain wrong. This passage is all about improving comprehension. Again common sense helps here - of course any reading course is going to be about learning what words mean not just saying them out loud.
E. Other reading programs do not focus on multi-syllabic words.In no way assumed. We have no reference to, or anything to tell us about other programmes. This is just a story about one programme

So overall quite tricky. Here is a good example of common sense really helping. Some of the suggestions were so perverse for a reading course that they were very likely to be wrong, even before analysis



Hi , Thanks for the explanation,

Just got a doubt with option A. The argument takes about the third grader but the option talks about whole students. How we can rely on this. is this option is selected by elimination process.
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Re: Our reading program teaches third graders to use phonics to [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2013, 02:36
Hi FTG,

I don't have that same problem with A.

If something applies to 'all students' then as '3rd graders' are a subset of 'all students' then it must apply to them to.

Cheers

James
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Re: Our reading program teaches third graders to use phonics to [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2015, 10:20
plumber250 wrote:
Good Afternoon. Here is how my brain worked through this problem:

Our reading program teaches third graders to use phonics to sound out multi-syllabic words by pronouncing prefixes and suffixes separately from base words, and then reading the word parts all together. Since children are still primarily reading aloud at this age, this approach ensures comprehension even in books that contain a high percentage of multi-syllabic words.

So no actual argument here, and a heck of a lot of very complicated vocab. Basically it seems to be about how 3rd graders are taught to read. Don't need to worry about too much more now.

The approach of the summer reading program assumes which of the following about third graders’ comprehension of multi-syllabic words?

So, in the passage there is an assumption. I've not read the passage in enough detail to know what that might be. So time to go through one by one....

A. Students will recognize multi-syllabic words when they hear them. This seems to be plausible. Reading the paragraph, it's not stated anywhere that students are taught to recognise multi-sylable words. Yet the approach is based on them being spotted and disected.
B. Multi-syllabic words are all composed of prefixes and suffixes.Seems wrong. Both from the context of the passage, but crucially from common sense - we know long words are not all made with prefixes and suffixes, it would be a crazy system if it assumed this.
C. Third graders struggle more than other students with multi-syllabic words. Not assumed anywhere. This is just how 3rd graders are taught, there is probably some truth that the young 3rd garders need to overcome this barrier before they can move up the ranks, but that's not said in the passage.[
D. Comprehension is less important than sounding out words. Just plain wrong. This passage is all about improving comprehension. Again common sense helps here - of course any reading course is going to be about learning what words mean not just saying them out loud.
E. Other reading programs do not focus on multi-syllabic words.In no way assumed. We have no reference to, or anything to tell us about other programmes. This is just a story about one programme

So overall quite tricky. Here is a good example of common sense really helping. Some of the suggestions were so perverse for a reading course that they were very likely to be wrong, even before analysis



My accuracy on CR 700+ level questions is very low. How do I improve it?
Re: Our reading program teaches third graders to use phonics to   [#permalink] 28 Nov 2015, 10:20
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