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Out of America's fascination with all things antique have

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Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2016, 18:18
Minheequang wrote:
Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.
(A) things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(B) things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing
(C) things that are antiques has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
(D) antique things have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(E) antique things has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring

The answer is (B). I have no problem with the meaning of this choice, but what is things antique. I can't understand its meaning or its structure: Noun + ADJ ???


Source of question?

I think a comma is missing.
Out of America's fascination with all things , antique

Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

Out of America's fascination with all [u]things is subordinate clause

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Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2016, 15:50
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rahul202 wrote:
Minheequang wrote:
Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.
(A) things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(B) things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing
(C) things that are antiques has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
(D) antique things have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(E) antique things has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring

The answer is (B). I have no problem with the meaning of this choice, but what is things antique. I can't understand its meaning or its structure: Noun + ADJ ???


Source of question?

I think a comma is missing.
Out of America's fascination with all things , antique

Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

Out of America's fascination with all [u]things is subordinate clause


The sentence is alright, comma is not required. The meaning of this sentence is as follows:

A market has grown out of America's fascination with things THAT ARE antique.

It is stylistically acceptable to omit "that are".

Second, "Out of America's fascination with all things" is NOT a clause at all - there is no verb in this part. It is a prepositional phrase.

Moreover this sentence becomes even more tricky because of the subject-verb flip. The subject "a market" comes AFTER the verb "has grown".

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Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have [#permalink]

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New post 30 Aug 2016, 06:57
My approach to solve this question :

1. Look at the split for bringing , the present continuous tense is required hence eliminate C & E
2. Now in A,B and D antique is singular, hence the split has is required over have : eliminate A and D
3. Left with B, read it again with full sentence sounds correct

Total time taken to solve : 56 seconds

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Re: Out of the public's interest in the details of and conflicts [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2016, 06:03
daagh wrote:
To understand this question in its logical perspective, one needs to appreciate that the shows themselves create the interest by virtue of their sensational nature and therefore people throng to see them. Therefore, it is clear that the shows entice people. Then a demand emerges and the commercial people step in to cash in on the ready-made boom to make easy money. Therefore, the booming market is the end of the chain and not the beginning.
If this tenet is clear, then this can be easily solved. Here the verb has to be plural either -are bringing or a simple present tense bring. It is now the importance of the increasing frequency can be realized. It a frequently changing one means that it is a dynamic factor and an on- going affair. What better way could be there than to describe in a progressive tense—namely, are bringing. Please also note that choice B meticulously abides by the touch rule of relative pronoun. Therefore, B is the best IMO.
Kaplan’ choice of D as the official answer is understandable, considering Kaplan’s fancy for gaining popularity more through controversies than through logic


I agree with you, this is a variation of an official guide question:
Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

In this sentence, the relative pronoun “that” could refer to the previous noun –fixtures- or nouns –furniture and fixtures- , yet it could also refer to the nucleus of the noun – styles or market.

In this case, by context, the pronoun “that” can only refer to market, so the subject of the clause is singular.

However, in this variation, “which” could refer to both market and shows, making the sentence ambiguous. If I had to pick one, I would pick “shows” –choice B- because it is next to “which”.

I have seen many variations of original questions, and the people who make these variations do not always take into account possible changes in syntax.
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Re: Out of the public's interest in the details of and conflicts [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2016, 16:01
sayantanc2k wrote:
plogod wrote:
See pic below for explanation.



The "intervening phrases and modifiers" would be frequently of the following types; identifying them may be useful to "keep track of the subject". The examples below are kept simple so as to aid in identifying / reducing more complex cases to such simple ones:

1. Prepositional phrase: The house beside the river was owned by John.
2. Subordinate clause modifier: The house that stands beside the river was owned by John.
3. Past participle phrase modifier: The house built beside the river was owned by John.
4. Present participle phrase modifier: The house standing beside the river was owned by John.
5. Absolute phrase modifier: The house - its colour not faded in years - is owned by John.




Hi sayantanc2k,

What should be the correct answer? I chose E

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Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2017, 11:02
A and D are cz of the "have". Should be singular has

C and E are out cz bring is plural

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Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2017, 05:42
Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.
(A) things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(B) things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing
(C) things that are antiques has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
(D) antique things have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(E) antique things has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring

Since "fascination" needs a "has" being singular instead of "have" - A, D are out
"bringing" is preferred over "that bring" because anything after "that" modifies what is immediately preceding "that", in this case "fixtures" which is incorrect as it is the "America´s fascination. that is bringing" .. "bringing" modifies the clause and hence option B is correct

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Out of America's fascination with all things antique have [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2017, 06:57
The original as such is very confusing and convoluted .
The answer to such question becomes easy if we paraphrase the original sentence .
A market has grown out of America's fascination with all things antique for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.
Now i think the subject becomes very clear and it is singular so we need singular verb.
Hope it helps.
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Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2017, 13:57
Minheequang wrote:
Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.
(A) things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(B) things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing
(C) things that are antiques has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
(D) antique things have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
(E) antique things has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring


Hi,

Let me try to help in this question.

Option B,
Out of America's fascination with all things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

RESTRUCTURING THE INVERTED SENTENCE STRUCTURE SO THAT IT MAKES MORE SENSE :


A market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures has grown out of America's fascination with all things [that are] antique that is bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

I hope this restructuring of the option B clears the confusion for this question.

Thanks.
-Varun

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Re: Out of America's fascination with all things antique have   [#permalink] 20 Oct 2017, 13:57

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