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Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone

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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2015, 12:40
Ergenekon wrote:
Thanks Mike. I also thought about it. But why do you think we can get a conclusion based on og13 questions? We do not have any reason to believe that the gmat regards its guides as much as its real exam questions. Having mostly not clear explanations for og problems shows otherwise. In addition, questions in which idioms can be used to find the right answer do not prove that those questions can only be answered by idioms. In my opinion, the gmat products have value only because they are official questions. However, their products are very low - quality. If there was another company with the official questions (in theory), I am sure the gmac would just go bankrupt:). I bought exam pack 1 and was disappointed a lot. For 50 dollars(or more) they provided me with question from gmat paper. So we can't assume that the gmac paid really serious attention to this case in og 13.

Dear Ergenekon,

My friend, I would urge you to be mindful of your words. The GMAT practice questions are exceptionally high quality: the explanations in the official material are often not quite as good, and sometimes, you will get better explanations from other GMAT experts. Nevertheless, the questions themselves have been subject to several stages of trial--- they have been refined in fire, and have emerged as pure gold. I will admit that some of the OG explanations are sub-standard, but don't judge the question quality by the explanation quality.

My friend, when you speak poorly of such a high quality product, it actually makes you look bad. It implies that you are assigning blame for what you fail to understanding. You have to be very careful about putting such speech out in public, in a place in which anyone could read it. What if a business school adcom, or potential employer, or potential partner saw what you were saying? It's always worth putting your best self forward in a public space.

It may be true that the composition of questions on any particular real GMAT is not precisely the same as the composition we see in the OG, but we have to assume that it's representative on average. Idioms are an important topic, precisely because they are about understanding the "feel" of the language. This is something particularly hard for non-native speakers to appreciate, but it's absolutely crucial on the GMAT SC. It's true that most incorrect answers in the GMAT SC are incorrect for more than one reason, but mistakes in idiom are clear and valid reasons for any answer choice to be incorrect, and anyone who wishes to excel on the GMAT SC cannot afford to neglect idioms.

If there are some questions in the OG or in Exam Pack #1 that you feel are not clear, or for which the official explanations leave you unsatisfied, please post them here on GMAT Club. Actually, search for them first, because no doubt such questions have been posted already. Find those threads, and read what the experts have to say. You are more than welcome to solicit my aid if you would like my opinions. Yes, the OG explanations are of varying quality, but do not doubt the high quality of the questions themselves.

Finally, here's a blog that you may find helpful:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/how-to-imp ... bal-score/

Mike :-)
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Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2015, 13:34
Mike, glad to discuss this with you. However, I don't know why you decided I spoke badly about the quality of questions. Although I encountered several times when Stacey and Ron from manhattan gmat mentioned that they did not like several questions by the gmat, I did not claim such thing in my previous post. I clearly expressed my thoughts on gmat products, which include official guide and exam pack 1. I think you would agree with me that the gmat exam has changed enough for many years. So providing too old questions as an exam pack 1 to exam takers is not a good idea. The whole purpose of my post was that your assumption that gmac takes its product - in this case og 13th- so serious as to make it a real representative of real exam is unwarranted. We don't know why they chose exactly those questions which are in og 13 and not other ones. In addition, I don't have much problems with explanations of gmat questions, although sometimes I notice that even experts have different explanations of the same question.
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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2015, 12:50
Ergenekon wrote:
Mike, glad to discuss this with you. However, I don't know why you decided I spoke badly about the quality of questions. Although I encountered several times when Stacey and Ron from manhattan gmat mentioned that they did not like several questions by the gmat, I did not claim such thing in my previous post. I clearly expressed my thoughts on gmat products, which include official guide and exam pack 1. I think you would agree with me that the gmat exam has changed enough for many years. So providing too old questions as an exam pack 1 to exam takers is not a good idea. The whole purpose of my post was that your assumption that gmac takes its product - in this case og 13th- so serious as to make it a real representative of real exam is unwarranted. We don't know why they chose exactly those questions which are in og 13 and not other ones. In addition, I don't have much problems with explanations of gmat questions, although sometimes I notice that even experts have different explanations of the same question.

Dear Ergenekon,
My friend, please forgive me if I misattributed certain motives or interpretations to you without cause. In your prior post, you said:
"We do not have any reason to believe that the gmat regards its guides as much as its real exam questions. Having mostly not clear explanations for og problems shows otherwise."
This is what lead me to believe you were critical of the OG explanations.

I was not aware that Stacey or Ron from MGMAT ever spoke badly about any official questions. Those are two seriously brilliant people for whom I have tremendous respect, and I have never heard them say anything negative about the questions.

Yes, the GMAT has evolved over the years, but many of the standards have remained the same. Some of the old questions might have been released years ago, but in many ways, they are still representative of the standards that the GMAT still maintains. All test questions, even older test questions, have been through a rigorous vetting process, so they are uniformly on a much higher level than almost all other test prep questions from other sources.

I don't know for sure, but my understanding is that the questions that make it into the OG are among the better questions that the GMAT chooses to retire. There is a tremendously long selection process, whereby questions are vetted and refined and entered into the active pool of live test questions. Every now and then, for exam security, they remove some questions from that pool, and I think they choose some of the better quality questions from among these for the OG. I think we have good reason to suspect that the overall selections of topics --- say, the kinds of grammatical issues in SC --- are more or less representative of the distribution in their live question pool. Certainly, that is the implicit claim of their products.

In my view, nothing about the quality of the questions suggests in the least that there is anything suspect about the products as a whole. I have met some of the people at GMAC, and I have been very impressed with their concern for presenting a rigorous and fair product. While their primary concern is for the live test itself, this concern also extends to all the products they offer. They are deeply concerned with maintaining a consistent high quality across brand.

I would urge you to find out a little more about this company and how it operates. I am not easily impressed, and I have been impressed by this company.

Mike
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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2015, 10:31
mikemcgarry wrote:
Ergenekon wrote:
Mike, glad to discuss this with you. However, I don't know why you decided I spoke badly about the quality of questions. Although I encountered several times when Stacey and Ron from manhattan gmat mentioned that they did not like several questions by the gmat, I did not claim such thing in my previous post. I clearly expressed my thoughts on gmat products, which include official guide and exam pack 1. I think you would agree with me that the gmat exam has changed enough for many years. So providing too old questions as an exam pack 1 to exam takers is not a good idea. The whole purpose of my post was that your assumption that gmac takes its product - in this case og 13th- so serious as to make it a real representative of real exam is unwarranted. We don't know why they chose exactly those questions which are in og 13 and not other ones. In addition, I don't have much problems with explanations of gmat questions, although sometimes I notice that even experts have different explanations of the same question.

Dear Ergenekon,
My friend, please forgive me if I misattributed certain motives or interpretations to you without cause. In your prior post, you said:
"We do not have any reason to believe that the gmat regards its guides as much as its real exam questions. Having mostly not clear explanations for og problems shows otherwise."
This is what lead me to believe you were critical of the OG explanations.

I was not aware that Stacey or Ron from MGMAT ever spoke badly about any official questions. Those are two seriously brilliant people for whom I have tremendous respect, and I have never heard them say anything negative about the questions.

Yes, the GMAT has evolved over the years, but many of the standards have remained the same. Some of the old questions might have been released years ago, but in many ways, they are still representative of the standards that the GMAT still maintains. All test questions, even older test questions, have been through a rigorous vetting process, so they are uniformly on a much higher level than almost all other test prep questions from other sources.

I don't know for sure, but my understanding is that the questions that make it into the OG are among the better questions that the GMAT chooses to retire. There is a tremendously long selection process, whereby questions are vetted and refined and entered into the active pool of live test questions. Every now and then, for exam security, they remove some questions from that pool, and I think they choose some of the better quality questions from among these for the OG. I think we have good reason to suspect that the overall selections of topics --- say, the kinds of grammatical issues in SC --- are more or less representative of the distribution in their live question pool. Certainly, that is the implicit claim of their products.

In my view, nothing about the quality of the questions suggests in the least that there is anything suspect about the products as a whole. I have met some of the people at GMAC, and I have been very impressed with their concern for presenting a rigorous and fair product. While their primary concern is for the live test itself, this concern also extends to all the products they offer. They are deeply concerned with maintaining a consistent high quality across brand.

I would urge you to find out a little more about this company and how it operates. I am not easily impressed, and I have been impressed by this company.

Mike



Hi Mike. Sorry for replying late. I understand your points and consider them decent. Thanks for such insightful discussion.
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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2015, 12:30
egmat wrote:
abid1986 wrote:
sher676 wrote:
Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone unearthed in Burma and estimated at 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of a crucial step along the evolutionary path that led to human beings.
(A) at 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of
(B) as being 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of
(C) that it is 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of what was
(D) to be 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of
(E) as 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of what was



In this question how two verbs(estimated and provide) are present without any conjunction?

I guess estimated & unearthed are verb-ed modifier here .
Please explain.


Dear Abid,

I think you've already answered your own question! "Unearthed" and "estimated" are modifiers, so "estimated" is not parallel to "provide", and no conjunction is needed. One way to be sure of this is to remove the modifiers and see whether the subject and verb still make sense:

Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone provide evidence of a crucial step along the evolutionary path that led to human beings.

"Fragments... provide" makes perfect sense.

Regards,
Meghna

is 'estimated at' always wrong on the GMAT?

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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2015, 14:10
Hi All,

An explanation from my side for the people who have confusion whether fragments or jawbone is a subject for provide.

Rule: a noun in a prepositional phrase ,in this case "of a primate jawbone", can never be a subject.Jawbone being a noun can never be a subject here.

Mike: Is this ok?

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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2016, 14:02
sher676 wrote:
Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone unearthed in Burma and estimated at 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of a crucial step along the evolutionary path that led to human beings.
(A) at 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of
(B) as being 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of
(C) that it is 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of what was
(D) to be 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of
(E) as 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of what was



Estimated to be is the only correct idiom here. Easy one.
Straight D! :D
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Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2016, 08:55
arpanpatnaik wrote:

I guess the trick is to understand the difference between 'estimated at' and 'estimated to be'. Since at is a preposition, it should be followed by a noun,


I don't think this is true. In the following official question, the correct answer says "dated AT 34 million years old".

fossils-of-the-arm-of-a-sloth-found-in-puerto-rico-in-80744.html

Perhaps "estimated to be" is the only correct idiom and people have been wrong in saying "estimated at". Interesting grammar rule that I otherwise would have been unaware of.

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Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2017, 07:25
30. Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate
jawbone unearthed in Burma and estimated at 40 to
44 million years old provide evidence of
a crucial step
along the evolutionary path that led to human beings.

(A) at 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of

(B) as being 40 to 44 million years old provides
evidence of

(C) that it is 40 to 44 million years old provides
evidence of what was

(D) to be 40 to 44 million years old provide
evidence of


(E) as 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence
of what was

Idiom; Agreement

The verb estimated should be followed by the
infinitive to be, not the preposition at—unless the
writer intends to indicate a location at which
someone made the estimate. The jawbone
fragments were estimated to be a certain age. The
plural subject fragments requires the plural verb
provide.
A Estimated is incorrectly followed by at.

B Estimated should be followed by to be, not as
being; the singular verb provides incorrectly
follows the plural subject fragments.

C Introducing a clause, that it is … , creates an
ungrammatical sentence; the singular verb
provides does not agree with the plural
subject fragments.

D Correct. In this sentence, the verb estimated
is correctly followed by the infinitive to be.


E The singular verb provides does not match
the plural subject fragments.
The correct answer is D.

Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid
about twice the size of the 6-mile-wide asteroid that
eradicated the dinosaurs has been dated to be 3.47
billion years old and thus is
evidence of the earliest
known asteroid impact on Earth.

(A) has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and
thus is

(B) has been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus

(C) have been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and
thus are

(D) have been dated as being 3.47 billion years old
and thus

(E) have been dated at 3.47 billion years old and
thus are


Agreement; Idiom
Th e plural subject of this sentence, Rock samples,
requires plural verb phrases—have been dated and
are rather than has been dated and is. Th e idiomatic
way of expressing estimation of age is with the
phrase dated at.

A The subject and verbs do not agree; dated to
be … is not idiomatic.

B The subject and verb do not agree; the
conjunction and thus should be followed by
a verb.

C Dated to be is not idiomatic.

D As being is not idiomatic; the conjunction
and thus should be followed by a verb.

E Correct. The plural verbs match the plural
subject, and the wording of the sentence is
idiomatic.

Last edited by Vyshak on 17 Jan 2017, 07:58, edited 1 time in total.
Topic Merged. Refer to the previous discussions.

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New post 14 May 2017, 11:59
sher676 wrote:
Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone unearthed in Burma and estimated at 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of a crucial step along the evolutionary path that led to human beings.
(A) at 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of
(B) as being 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of
(C) that it is 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of what was
(D) to be 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of
(E) as 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of what was


A "Estimated at" is not the proper idiom.
B "Provides" does not agree in number with "fragments."
C "Provides" does not agree in number with "fragments."
D Correct.
E "Provides" does not agree in number with "fragments."

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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2017, 09:55
If you are running out of time, this is an excellent candidate to eliminate 3/5 answes.

Notice that the original sentence uses the noun 'fragments' with the correct plural verb 'provide'. Using this alone, we can eliminate B,C and E

Now between A and D, the choice comes down to estimated at vs estimated to be. The GMAT prefers the latter since they relate the preposition 'at' to denote a location.
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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2017, 10:10
Imo D
Estimated to be is the correct idiom.
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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 02:57
estimated to be --idiomatic usage

fragments --provide (plural subj - plural verb)

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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 20:50
rpfinley wrote:
Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone unearthed in Burma and estimated at 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of a crucial step along the evolutionary path that led to human beings.

(A) at 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of
(B) as being 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of
(C) that it is 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of what was
(D) to be 40 to 44 million years old provide evidence of
(E) as 40 to 44 million years old provides evidence of

OA is D


estimated to be is the correct idiom

hence
D

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Re: Paleontologists believe that fragments of a primate jawbone   [#permalink] 14 Aug 2017, 20:50

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