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Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to

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Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 27 Aug 2017, 07:57
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E

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Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to the listener in a temporal order. A painting, in contrast, is not presented one part at a time to the viewer; there is thus no particular path that the viewer’s eye must follow in order to “read” the painting. Therefore, an essential distinction between the experiences of hearing music and of viewing paintings is that hearing music has a temporal dimension but viewing a painting has none.

The reasoning in the argument is flawed because

(A) the argument does not allow for the possibility of being immersed in experiencing a painting without being conscious of the passage of time

(B) the argument is based on a very general definition of music that does not incorporate any distinctions among particular styles

(C) the argument fails to bring out the aspects of music and painting that are common to both as forms of artistic expression

(D) relying on the metaphor of “reading” to characterize how a painting is viewed presupposes the correctness of the conclusion to be drawn on the basis of that characterization

(E) the absence of a particular path that the eye must follow does not entail that the eye follows no path.

LSAT

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Originally posted by SaGa on 26 Aug 2017, 23:26.
Last edited by broall on 27 Aug 2017, 07:57, edited 2 times in total.
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Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 02:16
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Here the key word is we do have a path or note, making a common ground for the two experiences.

A) consciousness is not the key word

B) Styles of music is not the key word : path

C) artistic expression is not our key word

D) this choice says
Quote:
relying on the metaphor of “reading” to characterize how a painting is viewed presupposes the correctness of the conclusion to be drawn on the basis of that characterization
In other words it cites: the metaphor of music is using to show and as a consequence to confirm that the argument is sound. But no trace of our key word:path

E) bingo: the fact that apparently, the observation of a painting through the eyes has no path, it does not mean that the same eyes DO NOT find (and as it turns out, the brain behind them) a cogent path.

Hope this helps

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Re: Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 10:15
In my opinion,
The argument here is that "hearing music has a temporal dimension but viewing a painting has none"

Here music is being compared to a painting. Path based on how the music is played makes it temporal according to the author. But this argument is flawed because there is nothing stopping from a viewer to follow a coherent time based path to get the meaning of the picture.

There is nothing stopping the viewer from doing that.
Option E is the only one where the flaw in this type of an argument is highlighted.
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Re: Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2019, 07:47
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SaGa wrote:
Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to the listener in a temporal order. A painting, in contrast, is not presented one part at a time to the viewer; there is thus no particular path that the viewer’s eye must follow in order to “read” the painting. Therefore, an essential distinction between the experiences of hearing music and of viewing paintings is that hearing music has a temporal dimension but viewing a painting has none.

The reasoning in the argument is flawed because

(A) the argument does not allow for the possibility of being immersed in experiencing a painting without being conscious of the passage of time

(B) the argument is based on a very general definition of music that does not incorporate any distinctions among particular styles

(C) the argument fails to bring out the aspects of music and painting that are common to both as forms of artistic expression

(D) relying on the metaphor of “reading” to characterize how a painting is viewed presupposes the correctness of the conclusion to be drawn on the basis of that characterization

(E) the absence of a particular path that the eye must follow does not entail that the eye follows no path.

LSAT


PREMISE: We EXPERIENCE music in a temporal order.
PREMISE: A painting is not PRESENTED one part at a time
PREMISE: There is no particular path that the viewer’s eye MUST follow
CONCLUSION: A distinction between the EXPERIENCES of hearing music and of viewing paintings is that hearing music has a temporal dimension but viewing a painting has none.

IMPORTANT: The conclusion is about the EXPERIENCES of hearing music and of viewing paintings.
The first premise addresses the EXPERIENCE of hearing music temporally, but the other two premises just tell us that there is no PRESET temporal path to view paintings. This, however, does not mean there is no temporal aspect to viewing a painting. It only means that there is no PRESET temporal aspect.
For example, some people might view a painting from left to right (temporally), other might view a painting from top to bottom (temporally) etc.

Given all of this, the best answer is E

Cheers,
Brent
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Re: Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2019, 02:50
GMATPrepNow wrote:
SaGa wrote:
Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to the listener in a temporal order. A painting, in contrast, is not presented one part at a time to the viewer; there is thus no particular path that the viewer’s eye must follow in order to “read” the painting. Therefore, an essential distinction between the experiences of hearing music and of viewing paintings is that hearing music has a temporal dimension but viewing a painting has none.

The reasoning in the argument is flawed because

(A) the argument does not allow for the possibility of being immersed in experiencing a painting without being conscious of the passage of time

(B) the argument is based on a very general definition of music that does not incorporate any distinctions among particular styles

(C) the argument fails to bring out the aspects of music and painting that are common to both as forms of artistic expression

(D) relying on the metaphor of “reading” to characterize how a painting is viewed presupposes the correctness of the conclusion to be drawn on the basis of that characterization

(E) the absence of a particular path that the eye must follow does not entail that the eye follows no path.

LSAT


PREMISE: We EXPERIENCE music in a temporal order.
PREMISE: A painting is not PRESENTED one part at a time
PREMISE: There is no particular path that the viewer’s eye MUST follow
CONCLUSION: A distinction between the EXPERIENCES of hearing music and of viewing paintings is that hearing music has a temporal dimension but viewing a painting has none.

IMPORTANT: The conclusion is about the EXPERIENCES of hearing music and of viewing paintings.
The first premise addresses the EXPERIENCE of hearing music temporally, but the other two premises just tell us that there is no PRESET temporal path to view paintings. This, however, does not mean there is no temporal aspect to viewing a painting. It only means that there is no PRESET temporal aspect.
For example, some people might view a painting from left to right (temporally), other might view a painting from top to bottom (temporally) etc.

Given all of this, the best answer is E

Cheers,
Brent


Dear Brent,

can you -lease shed light why D is wrong?
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Re: Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2019, 07:34
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Mo2men wrote:
GMATPrepNow wrote:
SaGa wrote:
Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to the listener in a temporal order. A painting, in contrast, is not presented one part at a time to the viewer; there is thus no particular path that the viewer’s eye must follow in order to “read” the painting. Therefore, an essential distinction between the experiences of hearing music and of viewing paintings is that hearing music has a temporal dimension but viewing a painting has none.

The reasoning in the argument is flawed because

(A) the argument does not allow for the possibility of being immersed in experiencing a painting without being conscious of the passage of time

(B) the argument is based on a very general definition of music that does not incorporate any distinctions among particular styles

(C) the argument fails to bring out the aspects of music and painting that are common to both as forms of artistic expression

(D) relying on the metaphor of “reading” to characterize how a painting is viewed presupposes the correctness of the conclusion to be drawn on the basis of that characterization

(E) the absence of a particular path that the eye must follow does not entail that the eye follows no path.

LSAT


PREMISE: We EXPERIENCE music in a temporal order.
PREMISE: A painting is not PRESENTED one part at a time
PREMISE: There is no particular path that the viewer’s eye MUST follow
CONCLUSION: A distinction between the EXPERIENCES of hearing music and of viewing paintings is that hearing music has a temporal dimension but viewing a painting has none.

IMPORTANT: The conclusion is about the EXPERIENCES of hearing music and of viewing paintings.
The first premise addresses the EXPERIENCE of hearing music temporally, but the other two premises just tell us that there is no PRESET temporal path to view paintings. This, however, does not mean there is no temporal aspect to viewing a painting. It only means that there is no PRESET temporal aspect.
For example, some people might view a painting from left to right (temporally), other might view a painting from top to bottom (temporally) etc.

Given all of this, the best answer is E

Cheers,
Brent


Dear Brent,

can you -lease shed light why D is wrong?


You bet.

(D) relying on the metaphor of “reading” to characterize how a painting is viewed presupposes the correctness of the conclusion to be drawn on the basis of that characterization
The author doesn't use the metaphor to characterize how a painting IS viewed. The author uses the metaphor to characterize how a painting is NOT viewed.

Cheers,
Brent
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Re: Pieces of music consist of sounds and silences presented to   [#permalink] 05 Feb 2019, 07:34
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