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Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 27 Sep 2018, 02:14
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Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.


(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised

(B) than those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising

(C) than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising

(D) as those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south hurt crops and therefore raise

(E) as they were a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising


GMAT® Official Guide 2017

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 758
Page: 700


Producer Level

(A) Comparison (X higher than Y); Verb / Meaning (raised)

(B) CORRECT

(C) Comparison (X higher than Y); Structure / Meaning

(D) Comparison (X higher as Y)

(E) Comparison (X higher as Y); Structure / Meaning


First glance

The first word switches between than and as. The sentence will contain a comparison; should the comparison idiom use than or as?

Issues

(1) Comparison: X higher than Y; X higher as Y

The first three answers use than and the final two use as. Which should it be? Also, check that the comparison is an apples-to-apples comparison.

The correct idiom is either higher than or as high as. This sentence uses higher, so the correct pairing must be than. Eliminate answers (D) and (E).

Prices at the producer level are higher now

(A) than a year ago

(B) than those of a year ago

(C) than a year ago


What are the remaining answers comparing? Answers (A) and (C) compare now to a year ago. Answer (B) compares prices now to those (prices) of a year ago. While it can be acceptable to compare timeframes (as in OG 2017 #772 / OG 2016 #104 “this year” and “last [year]”), the more precise comparison in this problem is between the two prices: prices now versus prices of a year ago.

Answer (B) makes the proper comparison. Eliminate (A) and (C).

(2) Verb / Meaning: are hurting and therefore raised

The sentence is trying to convey a certain sequence of events: floods and drought are hurting crops and therefore causing something else to happen. This second event is caused by the first; therefore, this second event should take place at the same time as or later in time than the first event.

If crops are being hurt right now in the present, then it’s illogical to indicate that the consequence (raised prices) took place in the past. Eliminate answer (A).

(3) Structure / Meaning: and are hurting crops

Answers (C) and (E) both insert an and just before are hurting. What consequences does this have for the sentence structure?

Fix: The core sentences read:

(C) Prices are higher now than a year ago and are hurting crops…

(E) Prices are higher now as they were a year ago and are hurting crops…

In both cases, parallelism dictates that the subject prices must pair with the verb are hurting. In other words, the sentence indicates that the current prices are hurting crops. This is illogical. The floods and drought, not the prices, are hurting crops.

Eliminate answers (C) and (E) for faulty meaning.

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (B) makes a valid comparison between prices now and those (prices) of a year ago. It also clearly conveys the sequence of events: floods…and drought are…hurting crops now, and therefore (are) raising prices (also now).

*Note: the official explanation indicates that the word hurt, in answer (D), is in the simple past. The word hurt can also be simple present: floods and drought hurt crops (today or in general in the present) and therefore raise prices (again, today or in general). Answer (D) is still incorrect, but not for this particular reason stated in the official explanation.

Logical predication; Verb form

The sentence as written makes an illogical comparison between prices at the producer level and a time period (a year ago); surely the intended comparison is between such prices now and those of a year ago. The clause at the end of the sentence states that flooding and a drought are hurting crops, and as a result of this, they have raised prices of certain crops. Are hurting is in the present progressive tense, indicating an ongoing process; raised is in the simple past tense, indicating a completed action. It would be more appropriate to use the present progressive tense here as well, [are] raising.

(D) The comparative adjective higher requires the comparative term than instead of as; the tenses of the verbs in the latter half of the sentence, hurt (simple past) and raise (simple present), do not work together logically.

Originally posted by Arlene0504 on 25 Sep 2015, 23:31.
Last edited by Bunuel on 27 Sep 2018, 02:14, edited 5 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2015, 01:02
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First thing: Please look into transcription; corn and soybean prices should not be underlined.


For those who want to go into the complicated process finding the nuances in meaning created by ellipsis, they can do that; but before that one should ensure that one can eliminate as many choices as possible on grammar alone. IMO, this problem can be easily solved without bothering about the differences in meaning of comparison. We can forthwith dispense with D and E for using the ‘as’ comparator instead of the ‘than’ comparator. Among A, B and C:

A: than a year ago and are going down, even though floods I the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised --- are hurting and raised are blatant shift of tense. So gone.
B: than those of a year ago, and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising ---Grammatically good
C: than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising—This is a fragment; the conjunction ‘and’ creates confusion as to what are hurting crops and raising. They seem to point to the subject the sentence prices at producer level;

As a foot-note, I wish to add a small comment by no less than Ron on this
https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... 32362.html

Quote:
RonPurewal wrote: both versions are fine.
I looked at the problem, and—just as I suspected—the choices with '...than a year ago' can be eliminated for other, quite straightforward, reasons.

Don’t forget—the OG answer keys are usually incomplete, and often incorrect.
The official PROBLEMS are essentially flawless, but the official answer keys are not. (GMAC's all-stars, the people who write the problems, do not write the answer keys; GMAC 'outsources' that work to people of lesser talent, presumably to cut costs.)

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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2016, 00:57
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zoezhuyan, I agree with my colleague Ron Purewal (cited above) that the comparisons in A and C aren't necessarily faulty. There are other reasons to eliminate those choices. However, I want to make a slight correction to your analysis above. Your use of "that of" or "those of" in parentheses makes it appear that the implied comparison is between two nouns. Actually, your choices should read ("they were") or ("it was"). The comparison is actually between two adverbial modifiers. Prices are different now than they were last year. This is important because I can't say something like this:

American crows are larger today than in ancient China.

If we filled in "those," this might make sense: "American crows are larger today than those (crows) in ancient China." However, the actual implied meaning here is a comparison between two modifiers: "today" and "in ancient China." "American crows are larger today than (they were) in ancient China." This would make it seem that American crows existed in ancient China!
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New post Updated on: 03 May 2019, 22:09
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Quote:
Heating-oil prices are expected to be higher this year than last.
Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago


Both sentences are not the same grammatically.

In the first, you compare this year, a noun, with another year, namely last year, another noun.
However, in the second case you are comparing now, an adverb with a year ago, a noun.
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Originally posted by daagh on 06 Sep 2016, 09:12.
Last edited by daagh on 03 May 2019, 22:09, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2015, 03:09
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My reason for eliminating E is that, ‘higher’ a comparative degree of comparison, requires ‘than’ rather than “as”.

1.3 percent ‘higher now than’ is good. 1.3 percent ‘higher now as’ is incorrect. This is a rule of grammar.

‘As’ can act as a role player, as a preposition and as a conjunction. You require a clause only when it is used as a conjunction. In the other cases, it is followed by nouns. In this stimulus ‘as’ is used a preposition.
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2019, 15:42
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Hello Everyone!

This is a great example of a sentence that focuses on idiom structure and comparisons! Let's start by taking a quick look over each option, and highlight any major differences in orange:

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising
(C) than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising
(D) as those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south hurt crops and therefore raise
(E) as they were a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising

After a quick glance over the options, a few key differences jump out:

1. than vs. as (idiom structure)
2. a year ago / those of a year ago / they were a year ago (parallelism with comparisons)
3. even though / despite (transitions)
4. raised / raising / raise (verb tense)


Let's start with #1 on our list: than vs. as. No matter which one we choose, it will eliminate 2-3 options rather quickly, so let's start there. This is an issue of idiom structure. Whenever we see comparative language (in this case, the word "higher"), we know that the sentence is comparing two items and must be worded a certain way:

X is higher than Y = CORRECT
X is higher as Y = WRONG

Let's see which options do this correctly, and eliminate the ones that do not:

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising
(C) than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising
(D) as those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south hurt crops and therefore raise
(E) as they were a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising

We can eliminate options D & E because they don't follow the proper "X is higher than Y" idiom structure. That was easy!

Now, let's move on to #2 on our list: parallelism with comparisons. Whenever we compare two items by using the idiom structure "X is higher than Y," the X and Y in the idiom need to be parallel. Let's look at the original sentence closely to determine what two items it's comparing:

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

We can see that the sentence should compare the prices today versus prices from a year ago. Let's make sure each option compares similar things:

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised

This is INCORRECT because it compares the prices today to a year ago, which isn't parallel. You cannot compare prices to years - they're not the same thing!

(B) than those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising

This is CORRECT! The word "those" clearly refers to prices, so this is comparing the prices today to the prices from last year, which is parallel!

(C) than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising

This is also INCORRECT because it compares prices to years, which aren't parallel items.


There you have it - option B is the correct choice! It's the only one that compares two like items, and it uses the correct idiom structure for comparisons!


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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2016, 06:39
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manhasnoname wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
manhasnoname wrote:
Going by your logic, OA doesn't make sense, does it?

The choice should have been "than they were ..." . Am I correct?


The OA compares nouns ( prices now and prices of an year ago.) If the comparison were between clauses , then "they were" would be required. Clause comparison allows omission of repeated parts in some cases, but not in this example. Please see my post above.

Noun comparison: Prices now is higher than prices then.
Clause comparison: Prices are now higher than they were an year ago. (omission not allowed; "were" does not occur elsewhere in the sentence.)
Clause comparison: Prices were higher an year ago than prices were a couple of years ago (omission allowed, since "prices were" already occurs in the sentence.)


Makes sense.

Clarification question: Prices "are" higher now than they "were" a year ago is incorrect because "are" is different from "were". Did I get it right?
In other words, what I understood for your explanation is that the same exact verb is allowed to be omitted. Am I right?

Another follow-up question - What is the role played by "of" in the OA?

prices now are higher than those a year ago

vs

prices now are higher than those of a year ago


What is the difference?

Thanks!


Prices "are" higher now than they "were" a year ago is CORRECT, but "were" cannot be omitted because "are" is different from "were": Prices "are" higher now than they "were" a year ago is INCORRECT.

I do not see any difference between using and not using "of".
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2017, 11:04
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Shiv2016, I think part of the confusion is that there's a typo in the OP: there's no comma before the "and" in the OG version of this question. Here's the corrected version:

Quote:
Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising
(C) than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising
(D) as those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south hurt crops and therefore raise
(E) as they were a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising


So (B) is correct, and the comma is a non-issue. :)

Quote:
Also can this be a correct version of this sentence?

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago.


In real life, your sentence would be completely fine, in my opinion. But if we're being really strict and literal with this particular OG question, it's definitely not ideal: it sounds like we're comparing the prices themselves to last year, and that's not logical. More importantly, there's a better alternative available that makes the comparison much clearer: "Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than those of a year ago..." The correct version sharpens the comparison between old prices and new prices.
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2018, 20:44
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ammuseeru wrote:
Arlene0504 wrote:
Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago, and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising
(C) than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising
(D) as those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south hurt crops and therefore raise
(E) as they were a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising

OG2017 SC758


daagh, @Experts,

What does "those of" stand in option B.

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago, and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising

If it were just "THOSE" i would have understood. But i am not able to understand how "those of" stands for "prices"

"Those" is a plural pronoun, so it has to refer to a plural noun, right? Well, the only plural noun that comes before "those" is "prices," so there's nothing else it could possibly refer to! If you're unsure about the logic, simply replace "those" with "prices" and see if the sentence makes sense.

"Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than [prices] of a year ago..."

Sounds okay to me! So we've got confirmation that "those" does indeed refer to "prices."

(It seems as though you were thrown off by the presence of the preposition "of." All it's doing in the above sentence is modifying "prices." Which prices? The ones of a year ago. It plays the exact same role in the construction "those of a year ago.")

I hope that helps!
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2016, 10:21
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warriorguy wrote:
Can we safely say that the phrase: "higher now than a year ago" in options A and C are not grammatically incorrect?

I saw one of the post wherein it was mentioned that phrase is incorrect. I eliminated both the options based on other grounds.


Omission is acceptable if:
1. The omitted part is repeated ( i.e. it occurs at least once in the sentence).
2. It does not obscure the meaning.

Here is an example from OG, in which omission was allowed:

in-no-other-historical-sighting-did-halleys-comet-cause-such-24215.html#p157102

If omission is acceptable for such... as.... comparison, it must be logically acceptable for superlative+than comparison as well.

Now coming to this specific example, the complete sentence before omission is:

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than they were a year ago.

The verb were does not occur anywhere else in the sentence, hence it must be repeated - in this case omission is NOT allowed.
( In the comet example the omitted verb did cause occurs in the sentence - hence omission is allowed.)

Another alternative is to compare the prices (nouns) - the correct choice does noun comparison rather than clause comparison (please see my post below). (For clause comparison, "they were" would be required.)
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2016, 10:35
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manhasnoname wrote:
DmitryFarber wrote:
zoezhuyan, I agree with my colleague Ron Purewal (cited above) that the comparisons in A and C aren't necessarily faulty. There are other reasons to eliminate those choices. However, I want to make a slight correction to your analysis above. Your use of "that of" or "those of" in parentheses makes it appear that the implied comparison is between two nouns. Actually, your choices should read ("they were") or ("it was"). The comparison is actually between two adverbial modifiers. Prices are different now than they were last year. This is important because I can't say something like this:

American crows are larger today than in ancient China.

If we filled in "those," this might make sense: "American crows are larger today than those (crows) in ancient China." However, the actual implied meaning here is a comparison between two modifiers: "today" and "in ancient China." "American crows are larger today than (they were) in ancient China." This would make it seem that American crows existed in ancient China!



Going by your logic, OA doesn't make sense, does it?

The choice should have been "than they were ..." . Am I correct?


The OA compares nouns ( prices now and prices of an year ago.) If the comparison were between clauses , then "they were" would be required. Clause comparison allows omission of repeated parts in some cases, but not in this example. Please see my post above.

Noun comparison: Prices now is higher than prices then.
Clause comparison: Prices are now higher than they were an year ago. (omission not allowed; "were" does not occur elsewhere in the sentence.)
Clause comparison: Prices were higher an year ago than prices were a couple of years ago (omission allowed, since "prices were" already occurs in the sentence.)
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2017, 17:33
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The simple answer is that the GMAT is not consistent on this. Keep in mind that comma usage is generally not tested directly. The one absolute rule you *can* rely on is that you can't join two independent clauses with *only* a comma, as in "I like pie, it is tasty." You always need a conjunction or a semicolon.
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2019, 19:43
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layla2019 wrote:
hello, anyone knows that in option B "are hurting crops and therefore raising" ,what does "raising" mean? If it is a verb form, there should have "are" , so the sentence should be "are hurting crops and therefore are raising.."; or is it a modifier ? but it should modifier the noun right before it. I'm very confused...
Raising is part of the verb are raising, because are is "common" to both hurting and raising. We can read that portion of the sentence like this:

B ... floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising corn and soybean prices.

floods and drought
(a) are hurting crops
and
(b) are therefore raising prices.

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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2015, 00:21
2
I understand what you ask

this the old question, this year and last year are adverb, and they are comparision elements . they shoud be present in both part of comparision and should be paralel.

similarly, prices and those are comparison elemements and they should be present in both parts of comparision and should be paralel.

two questions are similar in that
both comparison elements are present in both parts and paralel.
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New post 15 Oct 2015, 01:53
Hi daagh,

Can you please explain more on how did you eliminate option E for using "as"?

IMO: As needs a clause after it and in this case we have "as they were a year ago".

Kindly help.


daagh wrote:
First thing: Please look into transcription; corn and soybean prices should not be underlined.


For those who want to go into the complicated process finding the nuances in meaning created by ellipsis, they can do that; but before that one should ensure that one can eliminate as many choices as possible on grammar alone. IMO, this problem can be easily solved without bothering about the differences in meaning of comparison. We can forthwith dispense with D and E for using the ‘as’ comparator instead of the ‘than’ comparator. Among A, B and C:

A: than a year ago and are going down, even though floods I the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised --- are hurting and raised are blatant shift of tense. So gone.
B: than those of a year ago, and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising ---Grammatically good
C: than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising—This is a fragment; the conjunction ‘and’ creates confusion as to what are hurting crops and raising. They seem to point to the subject the sentence prices at producer level;

As a foot-note, I wish to add a small comment by no less than Ron on this
https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... 32362.html

Quote:
RonPurewal wrote: both versions are fine.
I looked at the problem, and—just as I suspected—the choices with '...than a year ago' can be eliminated for other, quite straightforward, reasons.

Don’t forget—the OG answer keys are usually incomplete, and often incorrect.
The official PROBLEMS are essentially flawless, but the official answer keys are not. (GMAC's all-stars, the people who write the problems, do not write the answer keys; GMAC 'outsources' that work to people of lesser talent, presumably to cut costs.)

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New post 27 Sep 2016, 00:10
Hi instructors,

comparison is another problem confused me a lot

please help to check whether I am correct:
1/
sales are higher this year than last year -- Correct,
the same as
sales are higher this year than (that of) last year. the comparison is this year's sales and last year's sales.

2/
price is higher this year than last year -- Correct.
the same as
price is higher this year than (that of) last year. the comparison is this year's price and last year's price

3/
price is higher now than a year ago -- Correct
the same as
price is higher now than (that of) a year ago . the comparison is this now - price and a year ago - price

4/
price is 1.3 percentage higher now than a year ago -- Correct

thus, IMO, the comparisons in A and C are correct.

please check.

thanks a lot
have a nice day
>_~
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New post 01 Nov 2016, 03:16
hi experts,
here is a question,
please check the end of the sentence,corn and soybean prices.

I am curious, why no "corn's and soybean's prices" ?

waiting for your help

thanks a lot

have a nice day
>_~
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2016, 20:32
zoezhuyan wrote:
hi experts,
here is a question,
please check the end of the sentence,corn and soybean prices.

I am curious, why no "corn's and soybean's prices" ?

waiting for your help

thanks a lot

have a nice day
>_~


This usage is alright. It is not a practice to use possessive when referring to price in general, not specifically to that of a particular item.

The oil price has dropped drastically in recent past.... correct. (oil in general)
That doll's price is 10€. ..... correct. (a specific doll)
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2016, 21:57
Can we safely say that the phrase: "higher now than a year ago" in options A and C are not grammatically incorrect?

I saw one of the post wherein it was mentioned that phrase is incorrect. I eliminated both the options based on other grounds.
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New post 02 Nov 2016, 19:21
DmitryFarber wrote:
zoezhuyan, I agree with my colleague Ron Purewal (cited above) that the comparisons in A and C aren't necessarily faulty. There are other reasons to eliminate those choices. However, I want to make a slight correction to your analysis above. Your use of "that of" or "those of" in parentheses makes it appear that the implied comparison is between two nouns. Actually, your choices should read ("they were") or ("it was"). The comparison is actually between two adverbial modifiers. Prices are different now than they were last year. This is important because I can't say something like this:

American crows are larger today than in ancient China.

If we filled in "those," this might make sense: "American crows are larger today than those (crows) in ancient China." However, the actual implied meaning here is a comparison between two modifiers: "today" and "in ancient China." "American crows are larger today than (they were) in ancient China." This would make it seem that American crows existed in ancient China!



Going by your logic, OA doesn't make sense, does it?

The choice should have been "than they were ..." . Am I correct?
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a   [#permalink] 02 Nov 2016, 19:21

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