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Private trust run schools used to charge

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New post 23 Feb 2019, 08:34
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Private trust run schools used to charge high fees as they typically boasted better quality of teaching than the public schools. However, with advancements in technology and teacher training, technology driven teaching tools and quality teachers have become available to most public educational institutions and any additional teaching quality advantages over and above that available to all are rare. As a result, private trust run schools cannot claim better teaching quality and therefore should not be able to charge higher fees. Yet, a private trust run school increasingly continues to attract a significantly higher proportion of admission applications now than before.



Which of the following statements, if true, resolves the paradox presented in the passage?

A. In the past, students passing out from public schools have been known to become achievers in various fields.

B. Parents keep themselves updated about the changes being introduced in the education system of the country.

C. School applications have become an easier process with most schools now boasting of an efficient online application procedure.

D. The private trust schools being appropriately funded often boast of a higher number of seats than public schools.

E. While the quality of teachers and the breadth of teaching tools used are almost same at most public and private schools, most parents still believe that the quality of education imparted will be higher if they pay for the same.
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New post 23 Feb 2019, 08:38
The paradox is " Yet, a private trust run school increasingly continues to attract a significantly higher proportion of admission applications now than before."
There is a comparison bw before and after and not bw private and public schools according to question. How is C wrong considering the fact it provides a reason for higher applications now than before?
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Re: Private trust run schools used to charge  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2019, 12:49
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advikaggarwal wrote:
The paradox is " Yet, a private trust run school increasingly continues to attract a significantly higher proportion of admission applications now than before."
There is a comparison bw before and after and not bw private and public schools according to question. How is C wrong considering the fact it provides a reason for higher applications now than before?


There is an error in your understanding. The comparison is clearly between the proportion of total applications received by private trust run and public schools in the past and in present. Look closely at the final sentence of the passage, especially the word proportion in it. The sentence says that a private trust run school increasingly continues to attract a significantly higher proportion of admission applications now than before. The italicized part explicitly states that private trust schools are now receiving a larger share of overall applications, which is the sum of applications received by private trust run and public schools, than before.

Option C is wrong because it doesn't resolves the paradox of increase in proportion of admission applications received by private trust runs colleges despite significant improvements in quality of teaching at public schools. This option merely states that school applications have become an easier process. From this we don't know the impact on the change in proportion of applications received by the two types of schools.

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New post 23 Feb 2019, 12:55
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The argument does not mention anything to do with the application process of schools. Its about the quality of education between private and public school. advikaggarwal. E explain why private school are still admitting more than even they did before.

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Re: Private trust run schools used to charge   [#permalink] 23 Feb 2019, 12:55
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