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QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved

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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2017, 06:32
A new test for AIDS has proved helpful in eliminating blood, contaminated with the virus, from the nation's blood supply.

The sentence format is in present perfect so the action has already performed and the effect is tested
Option D and E can be elminated as it describes future prospects of the experiment

The format is synonymous to this

I look forward to meeting you

(A) in eliminating blood, contaminated with the virus, from the nation's blood supply
The meaning ambiguity, as this sentence implies performing more than one action
(B) in eliminating blood from the nation's blood supply that is contaminated with the virus;
Meaning ambiguity as it implies eliminating all the blood and the restrictive that wrongly modifies supply
(C) in eliminating from the nation's blood supply blood that is contaminated with the virus Correct
(D) to eliminate blood that is contaminated with the virus from the nation's blood supply
(E) to eliminate blood from the nation's blood supply that is contaminated with the virus
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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jun 2017, 08:44
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GMATNinja wrote:
Lucy Phuong wrote:
sriamlan wrote:
I think for OA C to be correct there must be a "," between blood supply and blood. It should look as mentioned below

in eliminating from the nation's blood supply, blood that is contaminated with the virus


Hi, IMHO I think if a comma is inserted the way you mention, then the meaning will be changed.

A new test for AIDS has proved helpful in eliminating from the nation's blood supply, blood that is contaminated with the virus.

Separated by a comma, the word "blood" seems to modify "nation's blood supply"; it means the WHOLE nation's blood supply is contaminated with the virus. This is not intended meaning of the sentence.

Option (C): ....eliminate from B A (it could be rewritten as eliminate A from B)
A: blood that is contaminated with the virus
B: the nation's blood supply
When you put a comma in the sentence: .... eliminate from B, A....
Then it looks like A is no longer what is eliminated, but B (A=B).
Also, we will have to put a big question mark before the comma - eliminate what?

Sir GMATNinja please guide us on this concern and correct me if I'm wrong. Thank you.


Sorry, Lucy -- I could have sworn that I responded to this, but I think I just gave you kudos and then forgot to hit the "submit" button on my response. Bad Ninja!

I think you're spot-on here. It's really subtle, but it sounds like that extra comma would make it sounds like the whole supply is contaminated. Tricky stuff!


Your message motivated me a lot :) Thanks thanks!
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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2017, 02:36
GMATNinja

Could please help me with D ?? The THAT after blood refers to blood right ? So where did the virus come from ??
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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 14:11
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anuj11 wrote:
GMATNinja

Could please help me with D ?? The THAT after blood refers to blood right ? So where did the virus come from ??


It might help to compare (C) and (D) right next to each other:

    (C) in eliminating from the nation's blood supply blood that is contaminated with the virus
    (D) to eliminate blood that is contaminated with the virus from the nation's blood supply

In (C), it's 100% clear that the blood is contaminated with the virus -- and that we're eliminating that contaminated blood from the nation's blood supply. That's the entire point of the sentence: the blood that's contaminated with the virus must be eliminated from the nation's blood supply.

In (D), the sentence is flipped around in ways that don't quite make sense, and aren't as clear. First, it's literally saying that the virus is from the nation's blood supply, and that's really not the point -- presumably, the virus itself came from somewhere else before it landed in the blood supply. Second, (D) literally says that we're eliminating contaminated blood in general -- not necessarily contaminated blood that is in the nation's blood supply.

It's a subtle distinction, but enough to make (C) a better answer than (D).

I hope this helps!
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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2017, 09:00
A new test for AIDS has proved helpful in eliminating blood, contaminated with the virus, from the nation's blood supply.

(A) in eliminating blood, contaminated with the virus, from the nation's blood supply
virus is not from nation's blood supply : Incorrect

(B) in eliminating blood from the nation's blood supply that is contaminated with the virus
blood supply is not contaminated : Incorrect

(C) in eliminating from the nation's blood supply blood that is contaminated with the virus
correct
(D) to eliminate blood that is contaminated with the virus from the nation's blood supply
virus is not from nation's blood supply ; Incorrect
(E) to eliminate blood from the nation's blood supply that is contaminated with the virus
blood suppply is not contaminated ; Incorrect
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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2017, 09:26
A is wrong b/c "contaminated with virus" is an essential part of the sentence.
It is still hard for me to see whether there is a purpose or not.
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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2018, 01:43
After mulling over (C)and (D), I chose (D), and when I checked the answer, I freaked out.
But eventually I was like, yeah.. I lose.

(C) in eliminating from the nation's blood supply blood that is contaminated with the virus
-> I was too familiar with 'eliminate A from B' construction, so I felt this 'eliminate from B A' construction too awkward.
But in this way, the sentence clearly avoids the modifier issues.

(D) to eliminate blood that is contaminated with the virus from the nation's blood supply
-> Now I can see that "virus from the nation's blood supply".. wrong! I was just reading the sentence in my own perspective. Always think about the modifier's location.

Oh, (A) is also something I should've thought about more deeply.

(A) in eliminating blood, contaminated with the virus, from the nation's blood supply
-> I just eliminated this because the sentence seemed messy with a lot of commas. However, there was a much more important reason: switching essential info to non-essential!
the commas in (A) indicates that 'contaminated with the virus' is non-essential info that can be omitted. However, this sentence does not work if 'contaminated with the virus' info is gone! This is also related to restrictive&non-restrictive issues about dealing with commas.
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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2018, 05:42
GMATNinja, isn't 'B' appropriate because "from the nation's blood supply" is a prepositional phrase? Thus, the that-modifier ("that is contaminated with the virus") reaches back to modify the appropriate noun ("blood"). 'C' places the noun closer to the modifier but seems to sacrifice any semblance of grammatical style. My concern: I got this down to choices B and C quickly, but I opted for 'B' because I thought this was testing the reach-back rule; I knew this was a "hard" question when I was making the selection between B and C, but I thought the "trick" was spotting the exception to a rule. It turns out the "trick" was sticking strictly to that rule regardless of how "awkward" the option sounds. Will this always be the case? Is it safe to assume that in cases such as this on the GMAT I should always select the answer choice that adheres strictly to noun-modifier placement rules and only opt for a "reach-back" answer choice if absolutely necessary?
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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2018, 05:46
In hindsight, I might have been a bit over zealous with the use of quotation marks in my previous comment...
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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jun 2018, 02:25
GMATNinja wrote:
Seeing lots of good explanations here already! But also a little bit of disagreement.

Quote:
(A) in eliminating blood, contaminated with the virus, from the nation's blood supply


I don't see anything wrong here grammatically. Some test-takers like to skip ahead, eliminate anything with definite grammar errors, and then circle back to choices such as (A) that don't have any obvious mechanical errors -- and that's not a bad approach at all!

But whenever you get to (A), the problem is that the modifier tweaks the meaning of the sentence. It sounds like the test eliminates all blood from the nation's blood supply, and the modifier inside the commas ("contaminated with the virus") is presented as extra, non-essential information that just describes the blood. And that doesn't make sense: the test will be helpful in eliminating only the contaminated blood, not all of the blood. (A) is gone.

Quote:
(B) in eliminating blood from the nation's blood supply that is contaminated with the virus


This one has a much clearer modifier error. The phrase "that is contaminated with the virus" modifies the noun it "touches": "the nation's blood supply." And that doesn't make sense, either, since we can't really say that the entire blood supply is contaminated. Eliminate (B).

Quote:
(C) in eliminating from the nation's blood supply blood that is contaminated with the virus


Wow, this sounds like hot garbage. I used to manage a team of writers, and if any of them had written this, I would have wondered if they were drunk or something. I don't think anybody would ever actually say this sentence in real life. It sounds terrible.

But your ear is not your friend on the GMAT! The important thing is that I don't see any grammatical errors or any meaning errors. "That" jumps out at me, but it's used well here: the blood is contaminated with the virus, not the entire supply. I guess we'll have to keep this piece of hot garbage -- it's not wrong. And we're always looking for four wrong answers, not one right answer. Since it has no clear mistakes, let's keep (C).

Quote:
(D) to eliminate blood that is contaminated with the virus from the nation's blood supply


(D) doesn't make logical sense, either. Strictly and literally, the sentence seems to be saying that the virus came from the nation's blood supply. That doesn't work. Eliminate (D).

Quote:
(E) to eliminate blood from the nation's blood supply that is contaminated with the virus


Same error as (B): the phrase beginning with "that" modifies the nation's blood supply, and that doesn't make sense. (E) is gone, too.

So (C) wins. In "real life", it's a lousy sentence, in my opinion. But the GMAT doesn't care: the other four answer choices have clear meaning errors, so we're stuck with crappy answer choice (C).
Sir shouldn't there be comma before blood as, blood +that serves as a noun plus noun modifier


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Re: QOTD: A new test for AIDS has proved &nbs [#permalink] 16 Jun 2018, 02:25

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