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QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action

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QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2017, 02:24
So, here is a classic example that "being" is NOT always incorrect in GMAT...

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Incorrect : "makes it likely to miss" - what makes is likely ? even if we ignore the "it" it is not clear what is "makes" referring to ..

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
Incorrect : this choice says that the executive is making it likely to miss ....and not the heavy commitment - this is definitely not the intended meaning


C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
Incorrect : Not sure what does "especially if it has ....." refers to


D. Executives' being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
Incorrect : What does "them" refers to here ? We need noun "executive" and NOT the possesive form "executive's"...

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
Correct : Being heavily committed is used as a Verb-ing modifier which is correctly referring to noun "an executive"
"especially one that ...past" is correctly referring to the "course of action"
So the final structure of the sentence is
Being X is likely to make Y miss Z ...

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QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2017, 01:04
Hi Experts,

Could you please point out my gap in understanding the following statement :

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

I think there is SV error with

'an executive' ... miss and
'an executive' ... misinterpret

Could you please explain.

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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2017, 04:32
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially ifit<could refer to both “course of action” and “commitment”> has worked well in the past, makes it<No antecedent> likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if ithas worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2017, 09:52
mikemcgarry: Hey Mike, this question is giving me goosebumps even though I ended up marking the right answer. Can you please validate the approach I have used. I am citing all the errors that I believe are present in the answer choices- Please let me know if you don't agree with some or many of my thoughts. Thanks.

A. EMPTY It problem(TALKING ABOUT THE SECOND IT THAT APPEARS IN THE STAEMENT). The other day I asked you about the cases where "Placeholder It" is correct, I referred to the Magoosh Blog and learnt that correct usage of a Placeholder It will always involve a main subject, i.e someone or something will do the main action. For example:
It is highly unlikely that Red Sox will win the cup. Here the usage of It is correct, and we have a main subject "Red Sox" doing the action. However, in choice A It happens to be the subject itself. So we are definitely not dealing with the placeholder it. Further this It does not seem to have any logical referent- How can a course of action or Commitment likely to miss signs of anything.
2. I also felt that option A has the wrong usage of "If Construction"- I believe that the correct usage of If should involve a conditional statement. Many a times, I saw that Official problems used "If" in place of "whether"- and these situations are entirely wrong. For example: "We have to decide whether we will go today" is the CORRECT STATEMENT. And the statement "We have to decide if we will go today" is WRONG. Similarly, I felt that the If clause in this particular options did not really present a conditional statement as the likeliness of missing the signs did not depend on the If Statement (IF IT HAS WORKED WELL IN THE PAST) but more on the HEAVY COMMITMENT. So I had reservations about this as well- though I am not completely sure.

B. This does not make any sense. I think I managed this option pretty well.

C. Here it can refer to both commitment and course of action. Though honestly, I eliminated this because I felt that the choice uses If construction incorrectly(I mentioned this above)

D. Possessive noun used , but then we have a pronoun referring to a noun, which does not exist. Executive's being..... makes them

E. By far the best choice. I have a bias that whenever Statement with BEING is used as a noun itself then it is most likely correct. Being on time is a good habit. When used otherwise, chances are high that it would n't be correct.

So here are my thoughts. If you could let me know whether my thinking process was correct- really appreciate the time you take out for queries. Thanks always Mike.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2017, 12:12
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- what does "it" (after the comma) refer to?

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
- Makes no sense. "makes missing signs of incipient trouble" is modifying who or describing what?

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
- what does "it" (after the comma) refer to?

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
- "Executives' being"? This makes no sense. Out.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.- Although I HATED "Being"...the rest of the sentence is perfect.

For me, key takeaway here is the idea that we should make clear that THE EXECUTIVE (can) miss signs of trouble or misinterpret them. A lot of A/C have ambiguous pronouns (i.e. "it").

Kudos please if you find helpful :)

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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action   [#permalink] 31 Aug 2017, 12:12

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QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action

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