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QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action

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QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2017, 00:04
Hi Experts,

Could you please point out my gap in understanding the following statement :

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

I think there is SV error with

'an executive' ... miss and
'an executive' ... misinterpret

Could you please explain.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2017, 03:32
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially ifit<could refer to both “course of action” and “commitment”> has worked well in the past, makes it<No antecedent> likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if ithas worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
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QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2017, 08:52
mikemcgarry: Hey Mike, this question is giving me goosebumps even though I ended up marking the right answer. Can you please validate the approach I have used. I am citing all the errors that I believe are present in the answer choices- Please let me know if you don't agree with some or many of my thoughts. Thanks.

A. EMPTY It problem(TALKING ABOUT THE SECOND IT THAT APPEARS IN THE STAEMENT). The other day I asked you about the cases where "Placeholder It" is correct, I referred to the Magoosh Blog and learnt that correct usage of a Placeholder It will always involve a main subject, i.e someone or something will do the main action. For example:
It is highly unlikely that Red Sox will win the cup. Here the usage of It is correct, and we have a main subject "Red Sox" doing the action. However, in choice A It happens to be the subject itself. So we are definitely not dealing with the placeholder it. Further this It does not seem to have any logical referent- How can a course of action or Commitment likely to miss signs of anything.
2. I also felt that option A has the wrong usage of "If Construction"- I believe that the correct usage of If should involve a conditional statement. Many a times, I saw that Official problems used "If" in place of "whether"- and these situations are entirely wrong. For example: "We have to decide whether we will go today" is the CORRECT STATEMENT. And the statement "We have to decide if we will go today" is WRONG. Similarly, I felt that the If clause in this particular options did not really present a conditional statement as the likeliness of missing the signs did not depend on the If Statement (IF IT HAS WORKED WELL IN THE PAST) but more on the HEAVY COMMITMENT. So I had reservations about this as well- though I am not completely sure.

B. This does not make any sense. I think I managed this option pretty well.

C. Here it can refer to both commitment and course of action. Though honestly, I eliminated this because I felt that the choice uses If construction incorrectly(I mentioned this above)

D. Possessive noun used , but then we have a pronoun referring to a noun, which does not exist. Executive's being..... makes them

E. By far the best choice. I have a bias that whenever Statement with BEING is used as a noun itself then it is most likely correct. Being on time is a good habit. When used otherwise, chances are high that it would n't be correct.

So here are my thoughts. If you could let me know whether my thinking process was correct- really appreciate the time you take out for queries. Thanks always Mike.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2017, 11:12
Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.
- what does "it" (after the comma) refer to?

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.
- Makes no sense. "makes missing signs of incipient trouble" is modifying who or describing what?

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.
- what does "it" (after the comma) refer to?

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.
- "Executives' being"? This makes no sense. Out.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.- Although I HATED "Being"...the rest of the sentence is perfect.

For me, key takeaway here is the idea that we should make clear that THE EXECUTIVE (can) miss signs of trouble or misinterpret them. A lot of A/C have ambiguous pronouns (i.e. "it").

Kudos please if you find helpful :)
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 02 Nov 2017, 14:14
A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. -"it" is an ambiguous pronoun in both instances… is it referring to the heavy commitment, the executive, or the course of action? “them” and “they” also seem to be confusing/ambiguous pronouns.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear. - “an executive… makes missing signs” sounds weird. I am suspicious because it’s supposed to be the act of being committed to a course of action that is making missing signs/misinterpreting signs likely, not an executive.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past. - the modifier “especially if it has worked well in the past” is too far away from “course of action”.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear. - “Executives’ being heavily committed” is wrong

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear. - looks good
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 02 Nov 2017, 14:33
IWilWin wrote:
Hi Experts,

Could you please point out my gap in understanding the following statement :

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

I think there is SV error with

'an executive' ... miss and
'an executive' ... misinterpret

Could you please explain.



Hello IWilWin,

I am not sure if you still have this doubt. Here is the explanation anyway. :-)

Following is the "expanded" version of the correct answer Choice E:

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive to miss signs of incipient trouble or to misinterpret them when they do appear.


Please note that neither an executive is a subject not miss and misinterpret verbs in this answer choice. In fact, an executive is the object of the verb phrase is likely to make. And objects do not take verbs.

Again the words miss and misinterpret are not verbs because they are preceded by the word to that remains understood in the original version of the correct answer choice.

This omission is not uncommon and is employed when the meaning is still clear with the omission. For example:

My friend helped me (to) finish the project in time.


And I am sure you know it that to verb phrases are NEVER verbs.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2017, 12:36
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 11: Sentence Correction


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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2017, 23:14
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 11: Sentence Correction


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Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

A. Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes it likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.

B. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that worked well in the past, makes missing signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting ones likely when they do appear.

C. An executive who is heavily committed to a course of action is likely to miss or misinterpret signs of incipient trouble when they do appear, especially if it has worked well in the past.

D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.

daagh i need your explanation on this question i really feel e is not correct because of various reasons:-
1 use of being.
2 being heavily committed to... ,here must be the persong who is heavily committed executive
3.verb is likely belongs to which subject i didn't get it please explain
thank you in advance
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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Please visit the link below; all your doubts will be cleared.

https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... t3173.html
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2017, 13:34
GMATNinja wrote:
This is one of the OG questions that causes the most trouble, partly because a lot of GMAT test-takers have an (occasionally incorrect) impulse to automatically eliminate any answer choice with the word "being."

But we'll get to that. Let's take these buggers in order:

Quote:
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.


"Them" is trying to refer back to a possessive pronoun, "executives'", and that's wrong on the GMAT. Non-possessive pronouns (they, them, he, she, it) can't refer back to possessive nouns on the GMAT. So (D) is gone.

Quote:
E. Being heavily committed to a course of action, especially one that has worked well in the past, is likely to make an executive miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpret them when they do appear.


There are lots of pronoun issues in the other answer choices, but we're all good with (E): the ambiguous "it" we saw in (C) isn't here at all, and "them" and "they" very clearly refer to "signs of incipient trouble." The subject "being heavily committed to a course of action" works nicely with the main verb phrase ("is likely to make an executive miss signs of trouble..."), so (E) is an upgrade from (B).

That leaves "being" as the only reasonable objection to (E). But "being" is absolutely fine here: it's just a noun, also known as a gerund in this case. "Being" is no different than any other gerund. So (E) is our answer.

Please see last Monday's Topic of the Week for more on gerunds and other "-ing" words on the GMAT: https://gmatclub.com/forum/experts-topi ... 39780.html.


GMATNinja- thank you for your response. Just to clarify: in D, the possessive part is also just wrong even ignoring that "them" can't refer to it. As in, there doesn't appear to be anything that should be possessive, so it's just wrong on its own, right? thanks!
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action [#permalink]

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New post 20 Dec 2017, 10:45
brandon7 wrote:
GMATNinja- thank you for your response. Just to clarify: in D, the possessive part is also just wrong even ignoring that "them" can't refer to it. As in, there doesn't appear to be anything that should be possessive, so it's just wrong on its own, right? thanks!

Quote:
D. Executives’ being heavily committed to a course of action, especially if it has worked well in the past, makes them likely to miss signs of incipient trouble or misinterpreting them when they do appear.

Hm, good question. I think I agree that the possessive is just plain wrong here, because it doesn't really make sense to for executives (or anybody else!) to possess "being heavily committed" -- I can't think of a case in which it would be appropriate to have a possessive in front of a gerund or participle, and it certainly doesn't work in this particular case. But if this said "executives' commitment to a course of action...", I'd be OK with it -- there's no problem with possessing the noun "commitment."

I hope this helps!
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Re: QOTD: Heavy commitment by an executive to a course of action   [#permalink] 20 Dec 2017, 10:45

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