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QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies

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QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2017, 21:56
warriorguy wrote:
Thanks for the clarification GMATNinja. Just for my understanding - If I change the phrase to --> each coterie that includes several breeding females

Now will the phrase (just the phrase and not the entire sentence) be valid?


Hi warriorguy ,

Yeah, now it is an absolute phrase and perfectly fine.

Thanks
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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2017, 04:18
I rejected option A because it uses a comma before 'that'.

Is there an exception to this rule if the ',that' is preceded by an appositive phrase, or is it a rule with no exceptions?

example: (phrase), appositive phrase, that...

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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2017, 04:43
ameyaprabhu wrote:
I rejected option A because it uses a comma before 'that'.

Is there an exception to this rule if the ',that' is preceded by an appositive phrase, or is it a rule with no exceptions?

example: (phrase), appositive phrase, that...


Hi ameyaprabhu ,

There is no such exception to this rule. The rule has been used as it is.

Notice that we have some extra information between two commas. So, if we remove that information, we still have that joined to colonies.

Look at below sentence:

Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies, called coteries, of roughly a dozen of them, that consist of several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and their new pups.

Notice that such kind of modifiers/phrases can come like this between two commas.

Let me know in case you have more concerns. :)
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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2017, 05:17
Hi abhimahna,

What I understand from your statement is that the sentence is fine, so do you mean to say that it is okay if 'that' is preceded by an appositive phrase (which means there will be a comma before 'that')?

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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2017, 05:24
ameyaprabhu wrote:
Hi abhimahna,

What I understand from your statement is that the sentence is fine, so do you mean to say that it is okay if 'that' is preceded by an appositive phrase (which means there will be a comma before 'that')?


Hi ameyaprabhu ,

Yes, this form is absolutely fine and there is nothing wrong in it.
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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 13:18
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 31: Sentence Correction



Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies, called coteries, of roughly a dozen of them, that consist of several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and their new pups.


Quote:
(A) of roughly a dozen of them, that consist of several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and their new pups.
(C) that have roughly a dozen of them, with several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and the females’ new pups.

'Them' is referring to whom? Plus, in A, 'their' refers to? Both of these options are OUT.

Quote:
(B) of roughly a dozen animals, each with several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that switch coteries frequently, and their new pups.
(E) with roughly a dozen animals, each coterie includes several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and the females’ new pups.

B - I love how 'each' is referring to animals. Plus, the same issue as in A with 'their'.
E - 'each.....lives' is a full on sentence and is separated by another full on sentence 'Prairie.... colonies' by a comma and that's incorrect.

Quote:
(D) of roughly a dozen, consisting of several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and the females’ new pups.

No grammatical issues with D, so that should be the answer.
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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2017, 17:54
this question is hard. Nevertheless, there is a short way to find the right answer here. That is to say, "their new pubs" is wrong -> A and B are out.
"with" are wrong -> eliminate C and E.
D is left.

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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 02 Nov 2017, 15:30
GMATNinja Don't you think there is meaning issues with D

that tend to switch coteries frequently, and the females’ new pups.

I understand male dogs switching coteries ( colonies) but the and in between switch coteries frequently AND the females’ new pups means male dogs switch the females' new pups.. How does that make sense though? Not sure what the author is trying to say?How can dogs switch the females new pups

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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 11 Nov 2017, 10:53
Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies, called coteries, of roughly a dozen of them, that consist of several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and their new pups.

(A) of roughly a dozen of them, that consist of several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and their new pups. - what does "them" refer back to?

(B) of roughly a dozen animals, each with several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that switch coteries frequently, and their new pups. - each with references back to "animals"... doesn't make sense

(C) that have roughly a dozen of them, with several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and the females’ new pups. - same issue as A

(D) of roughly a dozen, consisting of several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and the females’ new pups.

(E) with roughly a dozen animals, each coterie includes several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and the females’ new pups. with roughly a dozen animals seems to logically say to me that the prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies with roughly a dozen animals... so the dozen animals are living with the prairie dogs? The meaning of the sentence is that the colonies consists of roughly a dozen animals... so this meaning doesn't make sense to me.

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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2017, 20:15
Turkish wrote:
GMATNinja Don't you think there is meaning issues with D

that tend to switch coteries frequently, and the females’ new pups.

I understand male dogs switching coteries ( colonies) but the and in between switch coteries frequently AND the females’ new pups means male dogs switch the females' new pups.. How does that make sense though? Not sure what the author is trying to say?How can dogs switch the females new pups


I'm not 100% sure that I'm interpreting your question correctly, but I'll give it a shot!

Basically, the idea is that the word "and" indicates a parallel list of three nouns in this case -- and any of the modifiers beginning with the word "that" modify ONLY the preceding noun. So if we highlight just the parallel elements in the sentence, it seems pretty clear: "Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies, called coteries, of roughly a dozen, consisting of several breeding females that often stay together for their entire lives, one or two breeding males that tend to switch coteries frequently, and the females’ new pups.

That seems OK to me, because it's just saying that the colonies consist of those three types of prairie dogs: several breeding females, one or two breeding males, and the females' new pups. The rest of the stuff just gives us extra information about certain types of prairie dogs (the males frequently switch colonies, but the females don't), and that information does nothing to disrupt the parallel list.

Does that help at all?
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Re: QOTD: Prairie dogs live in tight-knit colonies   [#permalink] 20 Nov 2017, 20:15

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