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Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed

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Re: Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed  [#permalink]

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New post 02 May 2019, 09:26
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AjiteshArun Thanks for examples. One more thing; Which one Can I take away from this discussion, or none.

1. "modifiers should be closest to the noun/noun phrase" they are modifying or
2. "they should always be preceded by noun/noun phrase and cannot be placed anywhere else if there intended meaning was to modify that noun/noun phrase".

I understand that there are some cases such as "Standing at the gate, John was stung by a scorpion". Here Standing is far away from John but still it makes sense.


AjiteshArun wrote:
btrg wrote:
Thanks for prompt reply. One query on your explanation that is we have seen some correct examples in gmat where pronouns refer to something which way back in the sentence. So is it in this case that it refers to something else also or just the distance between them is the issue.
That's a very good question, and it is one of the things that seem to call for different approaches in different questions. My recommendation is that we recognize that we shouldn't look at a that as being a great way to do something just because it can do something. Because we have to choose the best of the 5 options given to us, we should incorporate things like ambiguity as well.

Take a look at this post. It links to an official question in which a that makes exactly the kind of jump you mentioned. We need to be prepared for questions like that (although they aren't very common), but we should also recognize that in a lot of other questions, we'll have to remove an option for ambiguity.

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Re: Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed  [#permalink]

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New post 02 May 2019, 20:13
Helium wrote:
aragonn wrote:

Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed striking similarities in identical twins, including many idiosyncrasies of behavior.

(A) Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed striking similarities in identical twins, including many idiosyncrasies of behavior.
- Wrong placement of modifier.

(B) Reared apart from each other, striking similarities between identical twins that include many idiosyncrasies of behavior were shown in a recent United States study.
- Same as A above

(C) A recent United States study showed striking similarities in identical twins reared apart from each other that include many idiosyncrasies of behavior.
-wrong use of restrictive "that"

(D) According to a recent United States study, identical twins reared apart from each other showed striking similarities, including many idiosyncrasies of behavior.

(E) According to a recent United States study, identical twins showed striking similarities reared apart from each other, including many idiosyncrasies of behavior.
-Wrong word order. It's identical twins who are reared apart.



This question is all about meaning. If one reads for meaning only D stands.

Ans : D


I agree with this. according to the study, identical twins reared .... etc. makes sense and brings out the true meaning.
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Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed  [#permalink]

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New post 02 May 2019, 20:54
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aragonn wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 11: Sentence Correction (SC2)


For SC butler Questions Click Here


Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed striking similarities in identical twins, including many idiosyncrasies of behavior.

(A) Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed striking similarities in identical twins, including many idiosyncrasies of behavior.
(B) Reared apart from each other, striking similarities between identical twins that include many idiosyncrasies of behavior were shown in a recent United States study.
(C) A recent United States study showed striking similarities in identical twins reared apart from each other that include many idiosyncrasies of behavior.
(D) According to a recent United States study, identical twins reared apart from each other showed striking similarities, including many idiosyncrasies of behavior.
(E) According to a recent United States study, identical twins showed striking similarities reared apart from each other, including many idiosyncrasies of behavior.

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Easy one to solve. You just need to follow the meaning.
(A) and (B) have a modifier error, as these options indicate the twins that were reared apart from each other, and so their mention should follow the modifying phrase "Reared apart from each other,". In (C), it is not clear whether the twins showed idiosyncrasies in behavior or the study. In (E), the meaning has been changed (it is twins reared apart who showed striking similarities, not twins showing striking similarities who were reared apart, as this option indicates).

Clear (D) it is.
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Re: Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2019, 01:02
"Similarities in" suggests similarities within the twins themselves. Technically we say "similarities between" the twins because there are 2 - i.e. they are twins.
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Re: Reared apart from each other, a recent United States study showed   [#permalink] 04 Aug 2019, 01:02

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