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Recently, a team of scientists digging through a tar pit unearthed a

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Recently, a team of scientists digging through a tar pit unearthed a [#permalink]

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Recently, a team of scientists digging through a tar pit unearthed a jawbone fossil. Initially, the team hypothesized that the jawbone came from a young gomphothere, a now extinct distant relative of the elephant, since the teeth were those of a juvenile. The gomphothere, however, is known for its large molars, and the teeth on the jawbone would not allow enough room for the molars of an adult gomphothere to fit. Based on this evidence, the scientists conclude that the jawbone fossil provides evidence of a distinct species closely related to the gomphothere.

Which of the following, if true, would best provide evidence showing that the conclusion above is possibly flawed?

A) The manner in which teeth grow provide sufficient evidence for the accurate classification of a bygone species.
B) In order for the molars of an adult gomphothereto emerge, several juvenile teeth are first forced out of the gums to accommodate the molars.
C) The molars of an adult mastodon, a close relative of the gomphothere, are similar in size to those of an adult gomphothere.
D) Many fossils exist that have yet to be conclusively attributed to any one species.
E) The juvenile jawbone of a species related to a gomphothere is longer than the juvenile jawbone of a gomphothere.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Recently, a team of scientists digging through a tar pit unearthed a [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2015, 09:39
can anyone explain in detail? i marked A.

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Recently, a team of scientists digging through a tar pit unearthed a [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2015, 09:52
grr8pe wrote:
can anyone explain in detail? i marked A.


Hello grr8pe

Conclusion: the scientists conclude that the jawbone fossil provides evidence of a distinct species closely related to the gomphothere [because]
Premise: gomphothere, however, is known for its large molars, and the teeth on the jawbone would not allow enough room for the molars of an adult gomphothere to fit

Link for conlusion:
This is not fossils of gomphothere because fossils' teeth took the place of molars

We should weaken this link

A) The manner in which teeth grow provide sufficient evidence for the accurate classification of a bygone species.
This is strength our conclusion because it says that manner in which teeth grow is enough for classification. So this is not gomphothere

B) In order for the molars of an adult gomphothereto emerge, several juvenile teeth are first forced out of the gums to accommodate the molars.
This is correct answer because it says that teeth that took place of molars will be push out. So this is possibly gomphothere.

C) The molars of an adult mastodon, a close relative of the gomphothere, are similar in size to those of an adult gomphothere.
Interesting fact but do not influence our link

D) Many fossils exist that have yet to be conclusively attributed to any one species.
Interesting fact but do not influence our link

E) The juvenile jawbone of a species related to a gomphothere is longer than the juvenile jawbone of a gomphothere.
Interesting fact but do not influence our link
_________________

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Re: Recently, a team of scientists digging through a tar pit unearthed a [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2016, 16:28
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Recently, a team of scientists digging through a tar pit unearthed a [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2017, 07:05
Harley1980 wrote:
Recently, a team of scientists digging through a tar pit unearthed a jawbone fossil. Initially, the team hypothesized that the jawbone came from a young gomphothere, a now extinct distant relative of the elephant, since the teeth were those of a juvenile. The gomphothere, however, is known for its large molars, and the teeth on the jawbone would not allow enough room for the molars of an adult gomphothere to fit. Based on this evidence, the scientists conclude that the jawbone fossil provides evidence of a distinct species closely related to the gomphothere.

Which of the following, if true, would best provide evidence showing that the conclusion above is possibly flawed?

A) The manner in which teeth grow provide sufficient evidence for the accurate classification of a bygone species.This could be an assumption.
B) In order for the molars of an adult gomphothereto emerge, several juvenile teeth are first forced out of the gums to accommodate the molars.In case the teeth are forced out the gums, then the space created could be sufficient for the molars to grow.
C) The molars of an adult mastodon, a close relative of the gomphothere, are similar in size to those of an adult gomphothere.So what? Nothing substantial.
D) Many fossils exist that have yet to be conclusively attributed to any one species.So?
E) The juvenile jawbone of a species related to a gomphothere is longer than the juvenile jawbone of a gomphothereMild strengthener- The problem is the jawbone itself, irrespective of its size.

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Recently, a team of scientists digging through a tar pit unearthed a   [#permalink] 08 Oct 2017, 07:05
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