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Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2015, 11:27
karna2129 wrote:
How can (B) be the OA.I was for (D).Experts please help me.


Doesn't (D) actually support the argument, meaning that they train people who stayed behind for the positions, whereas B is the only one where the positions don't exist any more, so people who stayed behind can't find work.

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2015, 16:59
Okay, first we need to understand the question is about skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe.

Premise -> Highly skilled workers left for whatever reasons(perhaps greener pastures) to other countries/West.
Conclusion -> People who remain will get better jobs/will be in high demand.

What can stop that from happening? Look for options that weaken the conclusion.

Let's look at the options -

A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad.

Strengthens it. It says Eastern European factories (old employment factories of highly skilled workers,maybe!) prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad. That means skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe will get preference in getting job.

(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.

This can ding the bright prospects. When we reached to the conclusion that People who remain in Eastern Europe will get better jobs/will be in high demand. We have made this Assumption --> all those jobs, in which highly skilled workers were employed in are still there or there are job vacancies. Wrong assumption as most of those jobs are gone..oops!

Weakens the conclusion and hence the right answer!

(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West. - Irrelevant. We are not concerned about folks who left.

(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated. - Sister of (A) Strengthens it.

(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled. - Strengthens the conclusion.

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2016, 04:48
There is an assumption here.

There are positions available to be occupied therefore the demand is high.

What if there were no positions in the beginning."BA-BAAM" we have the answer.

B.There were positions which have been lost. due to loss of these poeple are moving.

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2016, 09:44
Premise: - Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West.
Conclusion:- It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

We are asked to weaken the argument , i.e, the conclusion. When we are asked to weaken the conclusion the answer choice must undermine the assumption that lead to the conclusion or provide an alternative means of achieving that conclusion or invalidate the conclusion with a logical reason.

(A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad. - This wil strengthen the argument hence false.

(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants - This is the right answer as if this statement is true, it will invalidate or undermine the conclusion as if many positions will be eliminated there need not necessarily be a high demand for the remaining workers.

(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West - This is out of scope on what already immigrated employees need to do.

(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated - This broadens the scope of the argument and in a way strengthens the argument hence eliminate this.

(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled. - this will strengthen the argument hence eliminate.
.
Correct choice, as explained above , is B

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2017, 00:01
Confused between B and D. Could someone clarify??

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2017, 12:07
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LarryM wrote:
Confused between B and D. Could someone clarify??

Quote:
(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated.

Choice (D) is tempting because it suggests that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe might not be in such high demand once the new workers are trained. But remember that we are trying to weaken the argument that the skilled workers ARE (presently) in high demand. If anything, choice (D) is evidence that there is a high demand for skilled workers, and that is why the countries plan to train new workers to fill that demand.

Quote:
(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.

Choice (B), on the other hand, suggests that there is no need to fill the jobs that were vacated when the highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe emigrated to the West. This suggests that there would NOT be a high demand for the skilled workers who remained in their home countries in Eastern Europe. Thus, choice (B) weakens the argument and is the correct answer.
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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 05:53
vaivish1723 wrote:
Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West. It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument?

(A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad.
(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.
(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West.
(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated.
(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled.

Can somebody discuss this one.


Premise :Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West.

Conclusion :It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

[color=#1b1464]As we can see to weaken the argument we have show some different reason for the conclusion or prove the conclusion false
B just gives us another reason why highly skilled worker are leaving their jobs in eastern Europe an going to western Europe. [/color]

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Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 05:56
arvind910619 wrote:
vaivish1723 wrote:
Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West. It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument?

(A) Eastern European factories prefer to hire workers from their home countries rather than to import workers from abroad.
(B) Major changes in Eastern European economic structures have led to the elimination of many positions previously held by the highly skilled emigrants.
(C) Many Eastern European emigrants need to acquire new skills after finding work in the West.
(D) Eastern European countries plan to train many new workers to replace the highly skilled workers who have emigrated.
(E) Because of the departure of skilled workers from Eastern European countries, many positions are now unfilled.

Can somebody discuss this one.




Premise :Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left jobs in record numbers to emigrate to the West.

Conclusion :It is therefore likely that skilled workers who remain in Eastern Europe are in high demand in their home countries.

As we can see to weaken the argument we have show some different reason for the conclusion or prove the conclusion false
B just gives us another reason why highly skilled worker are leaving their jobs in eastern Europe an going to western Europe.

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Kudos [?]: 69 [0], given: 535

Re: Recently, highly skilled workers in Eastern Europe have left   [#permalink] 04 Aug 2017, 05:56

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