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Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt

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New post 26 Apr 2019, 03:45
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Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exemptions permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that some carriers could be forced to hire additional pilots.

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently


SC12841.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION

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New post 02 May 2019, 13:15
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Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one problem at a time, and narrow it down to the right answer quickly! To begin, let's take a quick scan over the options and highlight any major differences in orange:

Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exemptions permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that some carriers could be forced to hire additional pilots.

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently

After a quick scan over the options, there are a few things we can focus on to narrow down our choices:

1. as much as vs. as many as (Idioms)
2. than vs. as (Comparisons/Idioms)
3. how each option ends (Meaning/Punctuation/Conjunctions)


Let's start with #1 on our list: as much as vs. as many as. This is a common grammar issue people often get mixed up, so here is a quick lesson on when to use "as much as" versus "as many as":

as much as = non-countable nouns & percentages
That pair of shoes costs as much as my last month's rent!
The failure rate for this class can be as much as 25 percent.


as many as = countable nouns
There will be as many as 250 people at our graduation party.
My coworkers work as many as 15 percent more hours than I do each week.


So let's take a closer look at our options and eliminate the ones that don't use the correct idiom:

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently

We can eliminate options A, C, & D because they don't use the correct "as many as" to refer to "hours," which are countable.

Now that we have it narrowed down to only 2 options, let's take a closer look at each one to find any other problems. Remember, we can look at "than/as" and how each option ends to determine if they create a clear and concise statement!

B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and
This is INCORRECT for a couple reasons. First, when comparing two items, we must use "X is more than Y," and not "X is more as Y." Second, the comparisons aren't parallel. This sentence compares the hours pilots at smaller carriers fly to pilots at larger airlines. Comparing hours flown to pilots isn't parallel - we must compare hours to hours!

E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently
This is CORRECT! It uses the correct idioms "as many as" and "X is more than Y." It also compares the hours that pilots at smaller carriers fly to the hours pilots at larger airlines fly, which is parallel.

There you have it - option E is the correct choice! If you can become familiar with common idioms and comparison rules, these types of questions are much easier to tackle on the GMAT exam when you spot them!


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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2019, 03:46
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Bunuel wrote:
Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exemptions permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that some carriers could be forced to hire additional pilots.

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently


SC12841.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION


Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exemptions permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that some carriers could be forced to hire additional pilots.

Quote:
(A) as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that

Should be "many", since hours can be counted. The latter part of the sentence just sounds awkward, especially with the "with the consequence...." concept.

Quote:
(B) as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and

"Many" works here but it should be "more hours.....THAN." A

Quote:
(C) more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently

Again, should be "many".

Quote:
(D) [color=#f26d7d]as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines' pilots, so[/color]

Avoid using plural possessives.

Quote:
(E) as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently

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Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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An interesting thing going on in this problem is that two different comparison structures are being used:

1) "as much/many as" (in "as many as 20% more")

2) "more than" ("twenty percent more hours than other pilots")

This can make it difficult to notice, but in choices (B) and (D) if you're looking for fatal, 100% wrong flaws, you can note that the "more hours than" comparison isn't completed with a "than," so those are completely wrong on that basis.

Then also you're dealing with a singular/plural issue with "much" vs. "many." Because the noun being modified is "hours," a plural noun, you should use "many" (e.g. "I studied for many hours") and not "much" (I studied for much hours??). Since (A), (C), and (D) all make that error, you can see that you're left with only (E) as the correct answer.
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2019, 07:03
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Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exemptions permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that some carriers could be forced to hire additional pilots.

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that - usage of as much as is incorrect as 'hours' is countable
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and - 'more than' is correct comparison marker
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently - usage of as much as is incorrect as 'hours' is countable
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so - usage of as much as is incorrect as 'hours' is countable, 'more than' is correct comparison marker
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently - Correct

Answer E
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2019, 23:59
VeritasPrepBrian wrote:
An interesting thing going on in this problem is that two different comparison structures are being used:

1) "as much/many as" (in "as many as 20% more")

2) "more than" ("twenty percent more hours than other pilots")

This can make it difficult to notice, but in choices (B) and (D) if you're looking for fatal, 100% wrong flaws, you can note that the "more hours than" comparison isn't completed with a "than," so those are completely wrong on that basis.

Then also you're dealing with a singular/plural issue with "much" vs. "many." Because the noun being modified is "hours," a plural noun, you should use "many" (e.g. "I studied for many hours") and not "much" (I studied for much hours??). Since (A), (C), and (D) all make that error, you can see that you're left with only (E) as the correct answer.


Hi

Regarding you first point, I have a doubt. Isn't "as much" modifying 20% ?
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The number (singular/plural) of a percentage is decided by what that percentage refers to. If it is a plural noun, then the percentage is plural and if the noun is singular, the percentage is singular.

Example of plural

1. 50 percent of the candidates have scored 800 in GMAT'
Here 'candidates' is plural and therefore, 50% is plural and the verb is the plural 'have scored"

2. 50% of the people in Chennai use mineral water for their toilets because of severe water shortage.
'People' is plural, therefore 50% is plural, and the verb is the plural 'use'.

Examples of singular

1. Nearly 80% of the rainfall is lost to the sea in the coastal regions. Here, rainfall is singular and hence 80% is (effectively meaning a quantum) singular and the verb is the singular 'is'.
2. 100% of the milk supplied in big cities is derived from rural areas. Milk is singular and hence 100 % is singular.
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Originally posted by daagh on 01 May 2019, 01:35.
Last edited by daagh on 28 Feb 2020, 01:11, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2019, 05:20
EMPOWERgmatVerbal : you mentioned that as much as can be used for percentages and non countables. the current question also has usage of percentage but it got considered as to be used for hours and hence countable. So How do we decide in these percent sentences where to use much and where to use many.
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New post 12 Jun 2019, 12:31
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nlx23 wrote:
EMPOWERgmatVerbal : you mentioned that as much as can be used for percentages and non countables. the current question also has usage of percentage but it got considered as to be used for hours and hence countable. So How do we decide in these percent sentences where to use much and where to use many.


Hello nlx23!

Thank you for your question! I know this can be a tricky one, especially when percentages get involved! Here is another way to determine if you need "as much as" or "as many as" when you see a percentage:

If the percentage is the only thing you see = as much as

The students raised their SAT scores by as much as 15 percent.
(There is nothing countable attached to the percentage. Percentages by themselves are not countable nouns.)

If the percentage is followed up by "more/less/fewer" and a countable noun = as many as

The marketing team's new social media campaign brought in as many as 20 percent more new users this quarter.
(The term "users" is countable, so we need to use "as many as." The percentage is just there to tell you how many more users they got. It works the same as saying that they brought in "as many as 20 new users.")

I hope this helps!
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2019, 21:45
???permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently???
OG specifically mentions that the verb do should be inserted immediately following airlines to complete the clause.
But ???I walk faster than Brian??? is correct structure as per Magoosh SC book.
Accordingly the below mentioned structure should be acceptable.
???permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines , and consequently???
Can you please clarify where am I going wrong ?
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2019, 21:53
Bunuel wrote:
Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exemptions permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that some carriers could be forced to hire additional pilots.

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently


SC12841.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION




OG specifically mentions that the verb do should be inserted immediately following airlines to complete the clause.

“permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently”

But “I walk faster than Brian” is correct structure as per Manhattan SC book. Verb is missing after the second noun.

Accordingly the below mentioned structure should be acceptable without the verb 'do' after the noun pilots at larger airlines.
“permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines , and consequently”
Can you please clarify where am I going wrong ?
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2019, 04:23
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Let's start with #1 on our list: as much as vs. as many as. This is a common grammar issue people often get mixed up, so here is a quick lesson on when to use "as much as" versus "as many as":

as much as = non-countable nouns & percentages
That pair of shoes costs as much as my last month's rent!
The failure rate for this class can be as much as 25 percent.


as many as = countable nouns
There will be as many as 250 people at our graduation party.
My coworkers work as many as 15 percent more hours than I do each week.


So let's take a closer look at our options and eliminate the ones that don't use the correct idiom:

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently



EMPOWERgmatVerbal

I see that you've prefaced by saying that we use "as much as" for percentages. Why not here then?

I understand the countable v/s non-countable distinction but here, I thought that we couldn't really count 20% more hours. 20% of what?
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2019, 10:19
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Rony26 wrote:
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Let's start with #1 on our list: as much as vs. as many as. This is a common grammar issue people often get mixed up, so here is a quick lesson on when to use "as much as" versus "as many as":

as much as = non-countable nouns & percentages
That pair of shoes costs as much as my last month's rent!
The failure rate for this class can be as much as 25 percent.


as many as = countable nouns
There will be as many as 250 people at our graduation party.
My coworkers work as many as 15 percent more hours than I do each week.


So let's take a closer look at our options and eliminate the ones that don't use the correct idiom:

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently



EMPOWERgmatVerbal

I see that you've prefaced by saying that we use "as much as" for percentages. Why not here then?

I understand the countable v/s non-countable distinction but here, I thought that we couldn't really count 20% more hours. 20% of what?


Hello Rony26

If the percentage is stated without any additional details, we use "as much as."
If the percentage is stated as being part of something, we use "as many as."

Another hint that you need "as many as: = you'll often see the words more/less/fewer after the percentage. It's not always the case, but it's a good sign that if you see "X% more/less/fewer Y" that you'll need "as many as."

Here are some examples:

My grades dropped as much as 20% after I stopped going to my tutor.

In this case, the percentage stands by itself. There is nothing countable to go along with the percentage. It's also not being used to indicated that it's a part of something larger, so we use "as much as."

Hybrid cars can drive as many as 35% more miles than a traditional gas-powered car.

In this case, the percentage is describing how many more miles the car can drive - 35% more. Since miles are absolutely countable, we need to use "as many as" here.

I hope this helps! This is a tricky grammar concept, so I understand that it may take some practice to get familiar with it.
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New post 30 Sep 2019, 07:08
Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exemptions permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that some carriers could be forced to hire additional pilots.

E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently.


hi. I cannot see any action before "do"... just are is a verb and I know "do" is logical. could you explain ...
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New post 02 Jan 2020, 16:56
Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exemptions permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that some carriers could be forced to hire additional pilots.

As many as: countable noun
As much as: non countable and percentage

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that: as much as 20 percent more hours, We can count the hours( hours is countable) ( he worked for 2 hours) but time is non-countable.
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and: More X as Y( incorrect) and X and Y are not parallel
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently : Same as A
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so: same as A
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently: Wordy but correct: More X than Y. And X and Y are parallel.
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2020, 19:57
When you see a lengthy sentence such as this, it is always good to read it and scan the options to understand what the problem areas are.

Here we have choices between as many as vs as much as; than vs as; and different forms of ‘consequently’ at the end.

The trick here that got me was overlooking the ’20% more hours’ that was in the sentence. When it is just 20%, the idiomatic expression is ‘as much as 20%’. But here the right expression is ‘as many as 20% more hours’ since this is a countable figure.

Once we figure this out, we can safely eliminate options A, C, and D.

Now, it’s down to options B and E.
With B, you notice that there is actually a simple comparison error being made. Idiomatically, it should be ‘more hours per hour than Y’. Plus, comparison here seems to be between hours and pilots, which is incorrect.

So we can toss B and choose E which is the right answer.

Hope this helps!
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2020, 10:10
Do we say "home many percentage more" or " how much percentage more"
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New post 28 Feb 2020, 00:18
aepmk Neither of those works. It would be "How much/many more?" or "What percent more?"
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New post 28 Feb 2020, 03:33
DmitryFarber do we say as much as 20 per event or as many as 20 percent in general ?

Posted from my mobile device
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Re: Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exempt  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2020, 18:19
Bunuel wrote:
Regulators are likely to end what are, in effect, long-standing exemptions permitting pilots of small turboprop aircraft at small carriers to fly as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that some carriers could be forced to hire additional pilots.

A. as much as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines fly, with the consequence that
B. as many as 20 percent more hours per month as pilots at larger airlines, and
C. more hours per month, as much as 20 percent, than pilots at larger airlines; consequently
D. as much as 20 percent more hours per month as larger airlines’ pilots, so
E. as many as 20 percent more hours per month than pilots at larger airlines do, and consequently

This one is super tricky with the "as much as" vs "as many as"

It's tricky to determine if we're dealing with a countable or uncountable noun.

If it just said "20 percent more than other pilots" that would be uncountable. 20% is uncountable.

However, the sentence says hours! Therefore we are dealing with a countable plural noun.

Use many for countable
Use much for uncountable

Eliminate A, C, and D

Between B and E

B incorrectly uses "as" for the comparison instead of "than." That's 100% incorrect.

Nice Question.
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