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require that vs require to

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require that vs require to [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2007, 17:30
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3.Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires of both public and private employers that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are usually held by men.

(A) that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are
(B) that pay for jobs historically held by women should be the same as for a job requiring comparable skills
(C) to pay the same in jobs historically held by women as in jobs of comparable skill that are
(D) to pay the same regardless of whether a job was historically held by women or is one demanding comparable skills
(E) to pay as much for jobs historically held by women as for a job demanding comparable skills

IS legislation....require...to is correct or Legislation... require...that is correct

Request you to explain your answer

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New post 20 Nov 2007, 18:10
Amardeep Sharma wrote:
3.Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires of both public and private employers that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are usually held by men.

(A) that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are
(B) that pay for jobs historically held by women should be the same as for a job requiring comparable skills
(C) to pay the same in jobs historically held by women as in jobs of comparable skill that are
(D) to pay the same regardless of whether a job was historically held by women or is one demanding comparable skills
(E) to pay as much for jobs historically held by women as for a job demanding comparable skills

IS legislation....require...to is correct or Legislation... require...that is correct

Request you to explain your answer


I am taking a chance here..I will go for 'B'. It is more on the usage 'requires of'

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New post 20 Nov 2007, 18:16
First of all, is it (C)?

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New post 20 Nov 2007, 18:22
It wont be nice to post OA so soon, before others have tried. However, you may give your explanation for choosing C... I will appreciate that

Amar

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New post 20 Nov 2007, 18:42
Amardeep Sharma wrote:
It wont be nice to post OA so soon, before others have tried. However, you may give your explanation for choosing C... I will appreciate that

Amar


well, here is my thought.

Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires of both public and private employers that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are usually held by men.

(A) that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are
(B) that pay for jobs historically held by women should be the same as for a job requiring comparable skills
--surely not correct: because of 'should'
(C) to pay the same in jobs historically held by women as in jobs of comparable skill that are
(D) to pay the same regardless of whether a job was historically held by women or is one demanding comparable skills
--regardless of whether I think is redundant. It is better to say: to pay the same whether a job was historically......
(E) to pay as much for jobs historically held by women as for a job demanding comparable skills
----jobs vs job. I think both should be singular or plural.

I had to choose between (A) and (C). Close call. I chose (C) because I thought I read somewhere 'requires of X to Y'. But I think I am wrong.

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New post 20 Nov 2007, 19:18
what all the idioms exist for 'require.. '.. anybody knows?

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New post 20 Nov 2007, 19:20
A for me.
as in C. ....jobs of comparable skills... sounds awkward.

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New post 20 Nov 2007, 19:45
"required to"
You are required to (verb). Example - You are required to go to the dining hall at noon. You are required to fill out all applications thoroughly.

"require/requires that" Example - A decent respect for the opinions of mankind requires that they declare the causes for the separation. Requires that (subject).
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New post 20 Nov 2007, 20:20
Going with A because C sounds awkward... "jobs requiring comparable skill" sounds much better than "jobs of comparable skills".

OG says there are two idioms of requires:

requires that x (be) y
requires x to (be) y

(be) stands for verb of being

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New post 21 Nov 2007, 02:43
After "requires of employers" we have to have a "that"... (if we had "require employers" we could use a "to").

So it's between A and B.

I think what differentiates these two is

requires that they do
requires that they should do

and I just think that the former construction seems better.

Answer (A)

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New post 21 Nov 2007, 05:01
i'll go for C. here is the idiomatic expressions:

requires that AB

or

requires A to B.

In this question, we already have the A, therefore "to" is required. Out of C, D, and E, C makes the most sense.

what's the OA?

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New post 21 Nov 2007, 06:05
Raffie wrote:
After "requires of employers" we have to have a "that"... (if we had "require employers" we could use a "to").

So it's between A and B.

I think what differentiates these two is

requires that they do
requires that they should do

and I just think that the former construction seems better.

Answer (A)


Is it not that in 'A' 'as' is used to compare nouns .

In 'b' 'same as' is used to do the same

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New post 21 Nov 2007, 16:53
Raffie wrote:
After "requires of employers" we have to have a "that"... (if we had "require employers" we could use a "to").

So it's between A and B.

I think what differentiates these two is

requires that they do
requires that they should do

and I just think that the former construction seems better.

Answer (A)


You hit the bulls Eye... OA is A

The relevant patterns are:

to be required to ...
to require someone to ...
to require of someone that ...

so its the last one in this case...

Amar

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New post 21 Nov 2007, 19:14
Amardeep Sharma wrote:
Raffie wrote:
After "requires of employers" we have to have a "that"... (if we had "require employers" we could use a "to").

So it's between A and B.

I think what differentiates these two is

requires that they do
requires that they should do

and I just think that the former construction seems better.

Answer (A)




You hit the bulls Eye... OA is A

The relevant patterns are:

to be required to ...
to require someone to ...
to require of someone that ...

so its the last one in this case...

Amar


If you can kindly post the OE. That will help a lot. Thanks... :roll: .

Keen to know how 'A' is better than 'B'

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New post 21 Nov 2007, 19:37
Beyond700 wrote:
Amardeep Sharma wrote:
Raffie wrote:
After "requires of employers" we have to have a "that"... (if we had "require employers" we could use a "to").

So it's between A and B.

I think what differentiates these two is

requires that they do
requires that they should do

and I just think that the former construction seems better.

Answer (A)




You hit the bulls Eye... OA is A

The relevant patterns are:

to be required to ...
to require someone to ...
to require of someone that ...

so its the last one in this case...

Amar


If you can kindly post the OE. That will help a lot. Thanks... :roll: .

Keen to know how 'A' is better than 'B'



# 109 in OG 10th Ed

Choice A is best. In choice B, should is illogical after requires, or at least unnecessary, and so is better omitted; in choices B and E, job does not agree in number with jobs; and in choices B, D, and E, the wording illogically describes the comparable skills rather than the jobs as being "usually held by men". Choices C, D, and E produce the ungrammatical construction requires of...employers to pay, in which of makes the phrase incorrect. In C, the use of in rather than for is unidiomatic, and jobs of comparable skill confusedly suggests that the jobs rather than the workers possess the skills. In D, the phrase beginning regardless...is awkward and wordy in addition to being illogical.

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New post 22 Nov 2007, 06:40
Skewed wrote:
Beyond700 wrote:
Amardeep Sharma wrote:
Raffie wrote:
After "requires of employers" we have to have a "that"... (if we had "require employers" we could use a "to").

So it's between A and B.

I think what differentiates these two is

requires that they do
requires that they should do

and I just think that the former construction seems better.

Answer (A)




You hit the bulls Eye... OA is A

The relevant patterns are:

to be required to ...
to require someone to ...
to require of someone that ...

so its the last one in this case...

Amar


If you can kindly post the OE. That will help a lot. Thanks... :roll: .

Keen to know how 'A' is better than 'B'



# 109 in OG 10th Ed

Choice A is best. In choice B, should is illogical after requires, or at least unnecessary, and so is better omitted; in choices B and E, job does not agree in number with jobs; and in choices B, D, and E, the wording illogically describes the comparable skills rather than the jobs as being "usually held by men". Choices C, D, and E produce the ungrammatical construction requires of...employers to pay, in which of makes the phrase incorrect. In C, the use of in rather than for is unidiomatic, and jobs of comparable skill confusedly suggests that the jobs rather than the workers possess the skills. In D, the phrase beginning regardless...is awkward and wordy in addition to being illogical.



Thank you so much Skewed. Really appreciate your help.

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New post 12 Mar 2008, 15:46
thx

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New post 12 Mar 2008, 17:19
good one +1
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Re: require that vs require to   [#permalink] 12 Mar 2008, 17:19
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