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Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources

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Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 27 Sep 2018, 04:58
2
6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

56% (01:01) correct 44% (01:12) wrong based on 404 sessions

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Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources of income, which is a chief key for predicting future cash flows.


(A) a client's sources of income, which is

(B) clients' sources of income, which is

(C) a client's sources of income, which are

(D) the income sources of a client, which is

(E) sources of a clientele's income, which are

Originally posted by goodyear2013 on 03 Jun 2014, 10:02.
Last edited by Bunuel on 27 Sep 2018, 04:58, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2014, 10:35
goodyear2013 wrote:
Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources of income, which is a chief key for predicting future cash flows.
A) a client's sources of income, which is
B) clients' sources of income, which is
C) a client's sources of income, which are
D) the income sources of a client, which is
E) sources of a clientele's income, which are


subject and verb never resides in the prepositional phrase (few exception exists for this rule as well).

now let's break down the answer choices
A) a client's sources {of income}, which is
B) clients' sources {of income}, which is
C) a client's sources {of income}, which are
D) the income sources {of a client}, which is
E) sources {of a clientele's income}, which are

in the above answer choices, underlined portions represents the subject. out of these answer choices, only option D makes sense hence the right answer.
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Re: Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2014, 12:11
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According to the Economist, the answer is actually C: https://gmat.economist.com/gmat-practic ... -y-subject

This approach makes me nervous, as the GMAT is not always keen on letting us skip over modifiers in applying "which." In any case, I should clarify that this is absolutely not a subject-verb issue, in which case we would definitely skip over the prepositional modifiers to match the parts up. That would look like this:

The client's sources of income are a . . . .

Either way, the answer certainly can't be D, because "is" doesn't agree with "sources."

Can I also go on the record as saying that "chief key" is terrible? :)
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Re: Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2014, 23:44
DmitryFarber wrote:
According to the Economist, the answer is actually C: https://gmat.economist.com/gmat-practic ... -y-subject

This approach makes me nervous, as the GMAT is not always keen on letting us skip over modifiers in applying "which." In any case, I should clarify that this is absolutely not a subject-verb issue, in which case we would definitely skip over the prepositional modifiers to match the parts up. That would look like this:

The client's sources of income are a . . . .

Either way, the answer certainly can't be D, because "is" doesn't agree with "sources."

Can I also go on the record as saying that "chief key" is terrible? :)


well sir, it indeed is a subject-verb issue, here is an official explanation provided by the economist gmat.

Correct!

This answer choice corrects the original Subject Verb Agreement mistake, by changing the singular verb is to the plural verb are, to match the plural subject sources.

What helps us identify this question as a Subject Verb Agreement question as well as identify this mistake is the following Stop Sign:

The subject is in the form of X of Y


and as i stated in my previous post, i was looking purely from the meaning perspective and the income sources, sounds much more accurate to me than a client's sources. so i marked option d in a hurry. off course i should have look at the part after the comma. but these are the kinds of mistake that i commit and hopefully i will not repeat them in the final exam.

Quote:
This approach makes me nervous


sir, i'm not the one who has invented this technique i'm a student like everyone else. i've learned this technique from your peers in the rival firm called e-gmat. may be you can have a debate with them regarding whether it is right to use this technique or not.
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Re: Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2014, 16:48
The correct answer is C as noted above by Dmitri. A screenshot of the question/correct answer is attached.
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Re: Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2014, 23:21
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manpreetsingh86,

Allow me to clarify. There is definitely a subject-verb problem to be handled in this problem, but the application of the modifier beginning with "which" is another matter, and we cannot automatically skip over prepositional phrases in this case. If we were simply trying to match a subject with a verb, we would ignore the prepositional phrases completely, but we are trying to match a modifier to a noun. While in this case we have to proceed by skipping the prepositional modifiers (the problem leaves us no choice), this is not always the case on GMAT SC problems. We have to use meaning to determine which noun the modifier applies to, and proximity plays an important role.

Consider the following fragment:

Today we should see a reduction in the prime interest rate, which is . . .

What should come next? Does "is" go with "reduction" or "rate"? It's impossible to tell at the moment. We can't simply cut out "in the prime interest rate," the way we would if this were a subject-verb problem. On the other hand, as we already saw in the originally posted problem from the Economist, we can't rely on the general rule that "which" modifies the preceding noun, as this does not always apply when there is an intervening modifier that clarifies the subject. We need to know what the sentence is trying to modify.

Today we should see a reduction in the prime interest rate, which is used to set rates for a broad range of loans.

Here, we are clearly modifying "prime interest rate." The fact that it is in a prepositional modifier does nothing to prevent us from modifying it with "which."

Today we should see a reduction in the prime interest rate, which is likely to lead to an increase in consumer borrowing.

Here we must be modifying "reduction," because it is the reduction and not the rate itself that will stimulate borrowing.

So, continue to cut out prepositional modifiers when you are solving subject-verb problems (The can of peas is on the shelf.), but work with meaning when applying modifiers.
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New post 08 Oct 2014, 22:31
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Not necessarily. Sometimes a group of things can be lumped together into a singular. For instance, "Credit default swaps were a chief contributor to the financial crisis." I wouldn't want to say "Credit default swaps were chief contributors . . . "
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Re: Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2016, 09:42
Any thoughts on why option E is wrong ??
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Re: Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2016, 18:59
goodyear2013 wrote:
Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources of income, which is a chief key for predicting future cash flows.
A) a client's sources of income, which is
B) clients' sources of income, which is
C) a client's sources of income, which are
D) the income sources of a client, which is
E) sources of a clientele's income, which are


A - sources - which is - SV agreement error
B - same as in A.
C - looks good.
D - sources - is - SV error - which btw correctly refers to sources and not client, as the "of a client" lies in the prepositional noun phrase, of which the head is sources.
E - sources of a clientele's income - wow..no..C is definitely better.
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Re: Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2016, 02:54
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Tmoni26 wrote:
Any thoughts on why option E is wrong ??


Clientele means a group of clients or customers considered collectively. The intended meaning of the sentence is that retirement planners typically begin by looking at sources of income of an individual client, NOT of a collective group of clients. Therefore the usage of the word clientele changes the meaning.
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New post 27 Sep 2018, 04:52
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: Retirement planners typically begin by looking at a client's sources &nbs [#permalink] 27 Sep 2018, 04:52
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