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SC: native to vs natives of

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SC: native to vs natives of [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2005, 08:42
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Could someone tell the difference between native to and natives of? I believe both are valid idioms.

PS: If this topic is already discussed could you please point me to the discussion. I did a search but it didn't yield expected result.
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New post 19 Oct 2005, 08:52
I believe the former is used in reference to plants, vegetation, and flora/fauna, whereas the latter is applied almost always to human beings.

Ex:

The silversword cactus is native to Maui, Hawaii.

<vs>

The Maoris are natives of New Zealand.

Hope this helps :)
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New post 19 Oct 2005, 13:13
I think in OG the meaning is slightly different. One refers to past and other refers to present. In otherwords,

one refers that the thing in discussion is still native of some place whereas other refers that the thing in discussion was native of some place. However, I was not sure.[/b]
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New post 19 Oct 2005, 22:46
I found this in some other forum and copy-pasting here for benefit of GMATClub members:

-- snip --
Yes, it's important to understand that in "native to," "native" is an adjective; in "native of," "native" is a noun (a person).

-- snip --

Additional information Idioms list can be found at: http://www.800score.com/guidec4view1g.html
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New post 20 Oct 2005, 13:22
Native to is an adjetive so it can be applied to plants, humans, animals, etc... Native of is a noun si it can only be applied to people.
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Re: SC: native to vs natives of [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2005, 15:40
As it has been told by many of us, the differences. I too wud put two sentences, meanings of them would elaborate the differences of usage, and their implied meanings.

1. We are becoming Natives to the paperless desks. ( Telling, getting used to, getting familiar with, sort of).

2. Zulus are the natives of South Africa.(Pointing to the place they belong to)

Tell me, if anybody finds me wrong in the explanation.
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New post 20 Oct 2005, 15:58
The explanations sound correct. I like to throw names in the sentence to make things stand out.

Is it "John is a native to England?" or "John is a native of England?"

<b>Native of </b> is idiomatically correct.

Native to...refers to animals, plants, etc. (anything non-human)

Native of...refers to humans
  [#permalink] 20 Oct 2005, 15:58
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