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Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key componen

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Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key componen  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2018, 06:14
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Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key component of MRI magnets, in the world. Because the supply is not renewable, it is frivolous to waste this precious resource on such products as party balloons. Instead, we should use other gases, such as hydrogen, to fill balloons, and the price of helium should be raised significantly to make it prohibitive for such trivial purposes.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest support for the suggestion that the price of helium should be raised?

1) Other medical imaging tests exist that do not require helium to function.
2) Hydrogen is at least as plentiful as helium, and is not a finite resource.
3) The cost of the helium used for medical purposes is already significantly higher than helium sold on the open market.
4) A survey of patients has shown that they do not mind paying slightly more for services if doing so helps the environment.
5) 80% of people who purchase gases for party balloons cite the price of helium as one of their top three considerations in choosing it.


I understand why is right, I do not understand why is wrong. If patients don't want to pay high price for helium, then the purpose of saving helium is not fulfilled. Can someone please explain.?

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Re: Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key componen  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2018, 06:58
nahid78 wrote:
Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key component of MRI magnets, in the world. Because the supply is not renewable, it is frivolous to waste this precious resource on such products as party balloons. Instead, we should use other gases, such as hydrogen, to fill balloons, and the price of helium should be raised significantly to make it prohibitive for such trivial purposes.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest support for the suggestion that the price of helium should be raised?

1) Other medical imaging tests exist that do not require helium to function.
2) Hydrogen is at least as plentiful as helium, and is not a finite resource.
3) The cost of the helium used for medical purposes is already significantly higher than helium sold on the open market.
4) A survey of patients has shown that they do not mind paying slightly more for services if doing so helps the environment.
5) 80% of people who purchase gases for party balloons cite the price of helium as one of their top three considerations in choosing it.


I understand why is right, I do not understand why is wrong. If patients don't want to pay high price for helium, then the purpose of saving helium is not fulfilled. Can someone please explain.?



Hi,
In the given passage, author is in favour of use of helium but against filling balloons up at any party. So to stop it’s wastage-filling up of balloons at any party-author suggests to raise price of helium.

Option E supports author conclusion.

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Re: Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key componen  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2018, 08:06
here the issue is not about the cost of the helium,but it is the scarcity

the author advises that it's use is restricted to hospital equipment

if most of the people don't use helium for filling up balloons ,there's no point in stopping it's use in balloons

Please correct me if i am wrong
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Re: Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key componen  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2018, 13:55
nahid78

The purpose of the proposal to increase prices of helium is to save it for important medical purposes.

It is said that people who use it for party balloons waste precious helium. D tells us that patients would be willing to pay higher prices for helium. However, it doesn't address whether people who use it for party balloons would be deterred from using helium. It doesn't really match what we're looking for.

Especially if you compare D to E you should see that the latter is the better answer as it clearly strengthens the proposal.

Hope I could help :-)
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Re: Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key componen  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2018, 18:53
"The price of helium should be raised".This needs strengthening.We can strengthen this argument by showing that this has an effect on the people using helium(in this case the effect is = making it more difficult for people to but helium balloons) & hence the raising of price is going to be useful.

Only answer fitting this logic is E.

No other option comes close.
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Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key componen  [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2018, 10:19
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priyankakosaraju wrote:
here the issue is not about the cost of the helium,but it is the scarcity

the author advises that it's use is restricted to hospital equipment

if most of the people don't use helium for filling up balloons ,there's no point in stopping it's use in balloons

Please correct me if i am wrong


Yes Scarcity is the Issue (You are right till this part)

And to protect that scare resource ( Non renewable) scientists have suggested that " The price of helium should be raised significantly to make it prohibitive for such trivial purposes."

Further the question stem requires us to " provide the strongest support for the suggestion that the price of helium should be raised? "

Thus if people who purchase gases for party balloons cite the price of helium as one of their top three considerations, then caertainly inceasing the price of Helium will have a deterrent effect on the consumption / use of this scare resource.

Hence Answer will be (E), (D) on the other hand diverts from the main issues to the patients who are willing to pay for the Gas ( If Helium can be protected then the patients will not have to pay more )
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Re: Scientist: There is a finite amount of helium, which is a key componen  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2018, 16:37

Official Explanation
Answer = (E).

The scientist in this passage has concluded that hydrogen, not helium, should be used to fill balloons, and that helium should be made more expensive. His evidence is the finite supply of helium. To strengthen the link between these ideas, we need to connect consumer use of helium to its low price. (E) does this by suggesting that one of the reasons people use helium for party balloons is its low price.

The scientist is going after frivolous, not medical, uses of helium (A). Furthermore, even if other medical imaging tests exist that do not require helium, look at the evidence the scientist cites: the supply of helium is finite. Identifying other medical imaging tests does not change that fact.

Choice (B) focuses on hydrogen, which is one example cited, but not necessarily the only substitute for helium. The fact that hydrogen is "at least as plentiful" for helium is promising. Does hydrogen have other issues, such as its flammability, that make its use at parties problematic? We don't know, but that's a possibility. Finally, this final line is completely unrealistic: hydrogen is "not a finite resource." What in tarnation does this mean? The entire Visible Universe is finite! What does it mean for a resource not to be finite? Does some divine being continual supply humans with unlimited hydrogen? How does such a resource fit into any known economic system? This last line raises many more questions than it answers. This does not provide strong support because of all the questions this raises.

If medical helium is already more expensive than the helium sold to consumers, (C), this tells us nothing about the finite supply of the gas, only about its price. To provide a strong strengthener, the statement has to connect the finite supply to the price, as in (E).

(D) is vague: to pay slightly more for services doesn’t tell us what people would think about raising the price of helium. It also doesn’t create a connection between the limited supplies of the gas and the possible price hike.
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