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Scientists have shown that older bees

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Scientists have shown that older bees  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2017, 11:07
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Scientists have shown that older bees, which usually forage outside the hive for food, tend to have larger brains than do younger bees, which usually do not forage but instead remain in the hive to tend to newly hatched bees. Since foraging requires greater cognitive ability than does tending to newly hatched bees, it appears that foraging leads to the increased brain size of older bees.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument above?

(A) Bees that have foraged for a long time do not have significantly larger brains than do bees that have foraged for a shorter time.

(B) The brains of older bees that stop foraging to take on other responsibilities do not become smaller after they stop foraging.

(C) Those bees that travel a long distance to find food do not have significantly larger brains than do bees that locate food nearer the hive.

(D) In some species of bees, the brains of older bees are only marginally larger than those of younger bees.

(E) The brains of older bees that never learn to forage are the same size as those of their foraging counterparts of the same age.

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Re: Scientists have shown that older bees  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2017, 18:53
Akela wrote:
Scientists have shown that older bees, which usually forage outside the hive for food, tend to have larger brains than do younger bees, which usually do not forage but instead remain in the hive to tend to newly hatched bees. Since foraging requires greater cognitive ability than does tending to newly hatched bees, it appears that foraging leads to the increased brain size of older bees.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the argument above?


(A) Bees that have foraged for a long time do not have significantly larger brains than do bees that have foraged for a shorter time.
Good contender. However, this choice is wrong since the argument makes the comparison between the older bees, which usually forage outside the hive for food, and the younger bees, which usually remain in the hive. The argument doesn't make any comparison between the length of time for foraging.

(B) The brains of older bees that stop foraging to take on other responsibilities do not become smaller after they stop foraging.
Same as A, the argument doesn't make any comparison between the length of time for foraging.

(C) Those bees that travel a long distance to find food do not have significantly larger brains than do bees that locate food nearer the hive.
The argument doesn't make any comparison between the distance that the bees locate to find food.

(D) In some species of bees, the brains of older bees are only marginally larger than those of younger bees.
This choice somewhat strengthens the argument.

(E) The brains of older bees that never learn to forage are the same size as those of their foraging counterparts of the same age.
Correct. The argument states that the younger bees have smaller brains because they don't have foraging skill/knowledge. This choice directly attacks the argument by stating that there is no difference between older bees that don't have foraging skill/knowledge and other older bees that do have foraging skill/knowledge. This choice indicates that there is another alternative reason: the size of brain is different as the difference in the responsibility that each bee takes care, not because the foraging skill itself effects the size of brain of bees.
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Scientists have shown that older bees  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 01:15
E is best..it gives alternative reason for a cause ...
Age is the factor not foraging.
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Scientists have shown that older bees   [#permalink] 17 Jul 2017, 01:15
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Scientists have shown that older bees

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