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Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New

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Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2018, 20:38
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

62% (01:53) correct 38% (02:00) wrong based on 196 sessions

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Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, and adjacent to only one other state, New Hampshire, is the US state of Maine, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States.

A. Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, and adjacent to only one other state, New Hampshire, is the US state of Maine, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States

B. In the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States, the US state of Maine, sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, and is only adjacent to one other state, New Hampshire

C. The US state of Maine, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States, shares land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, but is adjacent to only one other state, New Hampshire

D. Two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, share a border with the US state of Maine in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States, and one state, New Hampshire, is only adjacent to it

E. Only the US state of New Hampshire is adjacent to Maine, which shares a border with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States

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Re: Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2018, 21:10
A. Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, and adjacent to only one other state, New Hampshire, is the US state of Maine, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States

B. In the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States, the US state of Maine, sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, and is only adjacent to one other state, New Hampshire

C. The US state of Maine, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States, shares land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, but is adjacent to only one other state, New Hampshire

D. Two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, share a border with the US state of Maine in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States, and one state, New Hampshire, is only adjacent to it --> this sentence seems wordy, and it's not clear the antecedent of 'it'

E. Only the US state of New Hampshire is adjacent to Maine, which shares a border with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States --> misplaced modifiers

So I think C is the correct answer.
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Re: Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2018, 22:15
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aragonn wrote:
Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, and adjacent to only one other state, New Hampshire, is the US state of Maine, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States.

A. Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, and adjacent to only one other state, New Hampshire, is the US state of Maine, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States

B. In the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States, the US state of Maine, sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, and is only adjacent to one other state, New Hampshire

C. The US state of Maine, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States, shares land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, but is adjacent to only one other state, New Hampshire

D. Two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, share a border with the US state of Maine in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States, and one state, New Hampshire, is only adjacent to it

E. Only the US state of New Hampshire is adjacent to Maine, which shares a border with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New Brunswick, in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States


Official Explanation


A question that mentions the US States of Maine and New Hampshire and the Canadian provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick, four absolutely beautiful places well worth seeing.

The focus of the sentence is the US state of Maine—while it’s not a strict requirement, it usually makes more sense if the subject of the sentence is its focus. Notice, the surprising contrast that needs to be emphasizes is that this single US state touches two different Canadian provinces but only one other US State!

The five versions are quite different, so we have to treat each choice separately.

Choice (A) delays the entrance of the subject: this would build suspense in some constructions, but the “drama” of this sentence has less to do with Maine itself and more to do with what it borders. The main verb is simply the neutral “is.” For any GMAT taker not familiar with the geography of US states, identifying New Hampshire as “one other state” might not be clear—one other state of what? This version has an indirect unfocused feel. This choice is incorrect.

Choice (B) has a parallelism problem: “Maine, sharing ... and is only adjacent ...” This version puts a participle in parallel with a full verb. That’s a screaming parallelism mistake. This choice is incorrect.

Choice (C) focuses on Maine as the subject. It is clear and direct, with good contrast.

Choice (D) is rhetorically muddled—what is the focus here? It doesn’t have the needed contrast. Finally, the pronoun “it” at the end has no clear antecedent. This choice is incorrect.

Choice (E) is grammatically correct, but has multiple other problems. The first part of the sentence seems to imply that Maine is adjacent to absolutely nothing at all except for New Hampshire, but then, right after the first comma, we find out that Maine “shares a border” with Quebec and New Brunswick. In other words, it seems to suggest, quite illogically, that there’s a difference between being adjacent and sharing a border. This version also illogically suggests that the Canadian provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick are “in the extreme northeast corner of the continental United States.” How can parts of Canada be parts of the US? Choice (E) violates logic in a few ways, so this choice is incorrect.

The only possible choice is (C).
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Re: Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2018, 06:28
I dont understand why we need a contrast. The given statement is a fact and pretty straightforward.

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Re: Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2018, 07:03
AdityaHongunti

Consider this: A baby is not close to his biological mother but to the lady who lives across the street. ;)
This is a surprising and contrary to general truth.
Similarly, A U.S. state neighbors two Canadian provinces but only one U.S province. This statement is also surprising and requires contrast.

This is purely my understanding.

Hope it helps.
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Re: Sharing land borders with two Canadian provinces, Quebec and New   [#permalink] 28 Sep 2018, 07:03
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