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Students in the metropolitan school district lack math skills to such

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Students in the metropolitan school district lack math skills to such  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2020, 07:32
This question popped up on our Ask Me Anything About SC thread, and I'm reposting it here, just in case it helps anybody:

Aviral1995 wrote:
GMATNinja VeritasKarishma please help me with this question..
how can we identify which idiom is correct to use..i am really confused

https://gmatclub.com/forum/students-in- ... 79092.html

The following dialogue might help explain the idiom:

    New Yorker #1: My bedroom is small.
    New Yorker #2: How small is your bedroom?
    New Yorker #1: My bedroom is so small that I have to sleep with my feet hanging out of the window!

The idiom in the final sentence is: "... so ______ that ______." That's the same idiom used in the correct answer choice, as explained in this post and others in this thread.
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Re: Students in the metropolitan school district lack math skills to such  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jan 2020, 06:21
Dear Friends,

Here is a detailed explanation to this question-

walker wrote:
Students in the metropolitan school district lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming ever more dependent on information-based industries.


(A) lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming

(B) lack math skills to a large enough degree that they will be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy that becomes

(C) lack of math skills is so large as to be difficult to absorb them into a city’s economy that becomes

(D) are lacking so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy becoming

(E) are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming


Choice A: This answer choice fails to employ the correct idiom form "So...X...as to Y", as it uses the phrase "lack math skills to such a large degree as to make". Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice B: This answer choice utilizes the phrase "large enough degree", which is not an acceptable idiom form. Additionally, this answer choice also utilizes the future tense verb "becomes" although the sentence implies that the city's growing dependency on information-based services is a currently ongoing process. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice C: This answer choice inappropriately uses the adjective "large" to describe a "lack of math skills". This answer choice also shares the tense-related error found in Option B. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice D: This answer choice repeats the same idiom-related error found in Option A through its use of the phrase "are lacking so much in math skills as to be". Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice E: This answer choice employs the correct idiom form by using the phrase "so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb" and maintains the correct tense by utilizing the present participle "becoming". Thus, this answer choice is correct.

Hence, E is the best answer choice.

To understand the concept of "Use of So As To on GMAT", you may want to watch the following video (~1 minute):



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Re: Students in the metropolitan school district lack math skills to such   [#permalink] 20 Jan 2020, 06:21

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