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Studies of test scores show that watching television has a

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Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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A
B
C
D
E

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  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

56% (00:42) correct 44% (00:41) wrong based on 499 sessions

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Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those whose native language is English.

(A) to those whose native language is English
(B) with children whose native language is English
(C) with those who are native English speakers
(D) to children whose parents do not
(E) with children whose parents are native English speakers

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Manhattan says E, but I think it could be D. The pronoun "those" is not ambiguous since parents is referred to in the answer choice?
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2010, 10:07
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Compare usually takes the preposition “to” when it refers to the activity of describing the resemblances between unlike things: He compared her to a summer day. Scientists sometimes compare the human brain to a computer.

It takes “with” when it refers to the act of examining two like things in order to discern their similarities or differences: The police compared the forged signature with the original. The committee will have to compare the Senate’s version of the bill with the version that was passed by the House.


Hope it helps !
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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2010, 11:23
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Both "Compare to" and "compare with" are correct idioms.

1. “compare to” is to suggest resemblances between things that have essentially different natures:
In appearance, ripples in ocean water can be compared to frosting spread on a cake.

2. “compare with” is to suggest resemblances between things that have essentially similar natures:
Despite their different capacities, RAM can be compared with ROM in that both involve memory storage.

In the context of given Sentence, "compare with" is correct. Hence E.
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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2010, 01:11
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Parallelism is between children whose parents are Native english speakers and children whose parents are not English speakers.

In this context we are comparing children, i.e. two similar entities. Hence compared with has to be used. Compared to is used when we compare apples and oranges but here it is apples vs apples.

So applying the above two options E is the best suited option.
A & D are out because it uses "Compared To".
B is out because it uses who instead of whose.
C- just mentions "with". In this context we are comparing children with children. Not children and Native speakers.
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Re: Native language [#permalink]

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StevenSzekeres wrote:
Can someone please explain why "as compared to" does not work? ie why is it "as compared with"?


Steven,

"Compared to" and "compared with" are both fine idioms. Honestly, when you add in the "as" they both become suspect, but neither "as compared with" or "as compared to" are grammatically or idiomatically wrong. As bad as they might sound, we can't cross off any answers for this reason.

The real issue here is one that you can discover by always remembering to ask: "What is this problem really about?" and then "What does the GMAT like to test within that subject?" You need to get in the habit of asking yourself these questions when you see certain trigger words. The word "compared" in this problem is a giveaway that this problem is really about comparisons, which are really just a special form of parallelism. With comparisons, you need to compare apples to apples. The GMAT loves to create wrong answer choices that compares two things that can't logically be compared. Here, you need to compare either:

-children with children

or

-parents with parents

but you can't compare

-children with parents.

This gets us quickly down to D and E. If you can get that far, you've done great work! Between D and E, don't worry about it. We're constantly working to improve our curriculum, and this is one we have under review.

Happy studying!

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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has.. [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2012, 22:54
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E compares correctly. The pointers to be compared are of similar nature hence "compare with" and comparison should be between children whose parents does this and that.
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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has.. [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2012, 04:43
Fraz wrote:
why not 'D' ? Can any please explain.


Hi,

Your comparing parents & not the children hence D is incorrect
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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2012, 20:39
IMO E. It's a comparison between children who are native and non-native speakers.
the new question at MGMAT is different

as compared to those whose native language is English.
to those whose native language is English
with children whose native language is English
with those who are native English speakers
to children whose parents do not
with children whose parents are native English speakers

still e as answer tho
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Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 08 Oct 2012, 05:44
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those whose native language is English.

A to those whose native language is English
B with children whose native language is English
C with those who are native English speakers
D to children whose parents do not
E with children whose parents are native English speakers

Can any one suggest why is A wrong
Those is a possessive pronoun should refer to preceeding noun in number which it is refering to parents and should logically refer to.

E is more wordy though its straight fwd.
I always mess up with Comparisons.... Pls suggest me whats wrong in my approach.

Originally posted by Archit143 on 08 Oct 2012, 02:59.
Last edited by hamm0 on 08 Oct 2012, 05:44, edited 1 time in total.
Underlined missing SC
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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television [#permalink]

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Archit143 wrote:
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those whose native language is English.

to those whose native language is English
with children whose native language is English
with those who are native English speakers
to children whose parents do not
with children whose parents are native English speakers

Can any one suggest why is A wrong
Those is a possessive pronoun should refer to preceeding noun in number which it is refering to parents and should logically refer to.

E is more wordy though its straight fwd.
I always mess up with Comparisions.... Pls suggest me whats wrong in my approach.


The best way to solve comparisons is to think the PRIMARY question: What are we comparing?

SO, what are we comparing in this question
Answer: Children whose parents speak english as second language to children whose parents speak english as native language.

A is wrong because it compares children whose parents speak English as a second language TO those whose native language is English

I this case THOSE refers to parents.

Thus only contenders for right answer are B,D ,and E . And B,D can be easily eliminated . Therefore E is the answer
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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly [#permalink]

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I actually thought that D was also correct in this case.
I referred the Manhattan forum and found that they have made this question invalid as both D and E are correct.

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i've talked with Stacey, and we agree that "those" is fine to use for "children" in D, so the only real difference between D and E is the preposition at the beginning. Since that is a distinction that appears to be irrelevant these days, we have referred the problem to our problem writing committee. As far as i'm concerned, both D and E are acceptable on this one and the question is thus invalid..

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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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AmritaSarkar89 wrote:
I totally understand the logic here, but isn't compare with Idiomatically wrong???


Please go through this link to clear your doubt - http://grammarist.com/usage/compared-to ... ared-with/
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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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New post 02 Dec 2016, 06:06
sayantanc2k wrote:
AmritaSarkar89 wrote:
I totally understand the logic here, but isn't compare with Idiomatically wrong???


GMAT does not seem to differentiate between the usages of "compared with" and "compared to". All the 5 options are alright depending on which meaning the author wants to convey ! Thumb rule: When there are more than one grammatically correct sentence select the one that retains the meaning of the original sentence. In that respect, option A should be correct because all 5 sentences are grammatically correct.

That said I do see a probable problem in the non-underlined part: The word "as" before "compared" is not generally used in GMAT.

Such questions are not expected in the real GMAT.


Hi, I am still unsure with the explanation given. If all ans are correct then I would like to know why you are inclining yourself towards A? with the rule of concision? My take is E because I guess meaning wise E is most clear one.
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Re: Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2016, 10:41
arunavamunshi1988 wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
AmritaSarkar89 wrote:
I totally understand the logic here, but isn't compare with Idiomatically wrong???


GMAT does not seem to differentiate between the usages of "compared with" and "compared to". All the 5 options are alright depending on which meaning the author wants to convey ! Thumb rule: When there are more than one grammatically correct sentence select the one that retains the meaning of the original sentence. In that respect, option A should be correct because all 5 sentences are grammatically correct.

That said I do see a probable problem in the non-underlined part: The word "as" before "compared" is not generally used in GMAT.

Such questions are not expected in the real GMAT.


Hi, I am still unsure with the explanation given. If all ans are correct then I would like to know why you are inclining yourself towards A? with the rule of concision? My take is E because I guess meaning wise E is most clear one.


I already mentioned in my previous post the following:
"When there are more than one grammatically correct sentence, select the one that retains the meaning of the original sentence. In that respect, option A should be correct because all 5 sentences are grammatically correct." I prefer A because all other sentences, though grammatically correct, change the meaning of the original sentence.

Nonetheless, you can be rest assured that you would never get 5 grammatically correct options in the real test.

Not just E, all sentences convey a clear meaning.
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Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2018, 12:24
[/quote]I already mentioned in my previous post the following:
"When there are more than one grammatically correct sentence, select the one that retains the meaning of the original sentence. In that respect, option A should be correct because all 5 sentences are grammatically correct." I prefer A because all other sentences, though grammatically correct, change the meaning of the original sentence.

Nonetheless, you can be rest assured that you would never get 5 grammatically correct options in the real test.

Not just E, all sentences convey a clear meaning.[/quote]

sayantanc2k , mikemcgarry

Isn't the word "those" in choice A ambiguous? If it refers to parents, then we are comparing children with parents which seems incorrect. Could you please shed some light on it?

Also I am still unclear on why B is wrong. Could you please explain that too
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a   [#permalink] 20 Mar 2018, 12:24
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