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Subordinate Conjunctions

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New post 18 Sep 2019, 10:51
Can we treat subordinate conjunctions as modifiers? Are Subordinate Conjunctions modifiers? What other roles do subordinate conjunctions perform?
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New post 19 Sep 2019, 02:28
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MentorTutoring

Although observed by graduate student Jocelyn Bell in the summer of 1967, the discovery of the first sighted pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, had not been announced before February, 1968.

In the explanation of the above option it said somewhere that the "although" phrase is modifying discovery which is wrong, I get that.
but "although" is a subordinating conjunction; hence, the clause it follows is a subordinating clause and here it says its acting as a modifier so my question is are subordinating conjunctions modifiers i.e. they not only connect clauses of different priority but also gives additional information about the main clause and should convey related idea about the main clause?
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New post 19 Sep 2019, 08:24
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rohitchayal wrote:
MentorTutoring

Although observed by graduate student Jocelyn Bell in the summer of 1967, the discovery of the first sighted pulsar, or rapidly spinning collapsed star, had not been announced before February, 1968.

In the explanation of the above option it said somewhere that the "although" phrase is modifying discovery which is wrong, I get that.
but "although" is a subordinating conjunction; hence, the clause it follows is a subordinating clause and here it says its acting as a modifier so my question is are subordinating conjunctions modifiers i.e. they not only connect clauses of different priority but also gives additional information about the main clause and should convey related idea about the main clause?


rohitchayal - Ah, I understand the confusion now. The modifier within the phrase is observed by--the word although is still serving as a subordinate conjunction, not as a modifier on its own. Modifiers ending in -ing or -ed (followed by "by") are pretty common on the GMAT™, and I like to look at some amusing examples to help students illustrate the differences in meaning. For your own enjoyment:

Running down the street, I feel and hurt my knee. Correct
Running down the street, my knee got hurt when I fell. Incorrect - The sentence can be interpreted as saying that my knee detached itself from my body, took off down the street, and got hurt at the instant I fell, presumably because one of my knees just removed itself from my upright body and caused me to tip over, and then the knee, not I, got hurt at that instant, perhaps through some sort of quantum entanglement.

Powered by a core processor, the computer was one of my favorites. Correct
Powered by a core processor, I like my computer. Incorrect - Although people speak this way, the sentence can be interpreted as saying that I am powered by a core processor, and unless I am an android, that does not make much sense.

Thank you for providing the sentence in question (for everyone to see, which I think is helpful and kudos-worthy). Yes, I think the author of that explanation could have done a better job clarifying what was what to make the point.

Please let me know if you have further questions. I enjoy discussing grammar issues, even if I approach SC questions through a less strict grammatical lens.

- Andrew
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 17:24
rohitchayal wrote:
Can we treat subordinate conjunctions as modifiers? Are Subordinate Conjunctions modifiers? What other roles do subordinate conjunctions perform?


Hello, rohitchayal. I was going to write a post about subordinate conjunctions on the test and provide some examples, but then I came across this link at a site I remember having enjoyed in the past, Grammar Bytes:

https://www.chompchomp.com/terms/subordinateconjunction.htm

The article is way more detailed that I could be in my potential post. I hope it will prove helpful to you. If you have any specific questions about subordinate conjunctions in a GMAT™ practice problem you have encountered, I would be happy to take a look at it and offer my thoughts here, in this forum.

Good luck with your studies.

- Andrew
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New post 20 Sep 2019, 01:10
MentorTutoring I totally got this I didn't realise that there was a comma+ed construction in there. ThankYou!
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New post 20 Sep 2019, 01:16
MentorTutoring
A March 2000 Census Bureau survey showed that Mexico accounted for more than a quarter of all foreign-born residents of the United States, the largest share for any country to contribute since 1890, when about 30 percent of the country’s foreign-born population was from Germany.

I know that after a verb act as a reset, SV that SVO according to manhattan guide, and after a noun that acts as a relative pronoun

In the (E) option for the above question

(E) having the largest share to have been contributed by any country

Since a subject has to responsible for the comma+ing action, here what we think should be responsible for the comma+ing action? Census Bureau or Mexico?

Should the translation be

Census Board have the largest share to be contributed by any country
or
Mexico has the largest share to be contributed by any country?
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New post 20 Sep 2019, 03:46
rohitchayal wrote:
MentorTutoring
A March 2000 Census Bureau survey showed that Mexico accounted for more than a quarter of all foreign-born residents of the United States, the largest share for any country to contribute since 1890, when about 30 percent of the country’s foreign-born population was from Germany.

I know that after a verb act as a reset, SV that SVO according to manhattan guide, and after a noun that acts as a relative pronoun

In the (E) option for the above question

(E) having the largest share to have been contributed by any country

Since a subject has to responsible for the comma+ing action, here what we think should be responsible for the comma+ing action? Census Bureau or Mexico?

Should the translation be

Census Board have the largest share to be contributed by any country
or
Mexico has the largest share to be contributed by any country?


I can answer this one pretty quickly. The comma + -ing action must refer to Mexico, in this case, since a country is referenced, and the Census Board is not a country.

- Andrew
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Re: Subordinate Conjunctions   [#permalink] 20 Sep 2019, 03:46
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