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Tall children can generally reach high shelves easily

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Tall children can generally reach high shelves easily  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2017, 07:00
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A
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D
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  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

76% (01:29) correct 24% (01:48) wrong based on 112 sessions

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Tall children can generally reach high shelves easily. Short children can generally reach high shelves only with difficulty. It is known that short children are more likely than are tall children to become short adults. Therefore, if short children are taught to reach high shelves easily, the proportion of them who become short adults will decrease.

A reasoning error in the argument is that the argument

(A) attributes a characteristic of an individual member of a group to the group as a whole
(B) presupposes that which is to be proved
(C) refutes a generalization by means of an exceptional case
(D) assumes a causal relationship where only a correlation has been indicated
(E) takes lack of evidence for the existence of a state of affairs as evidence that there can be no such state of affairs

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Re: Tall children can generally reach high shelves easily  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2017, 12:00
Can anybody please explain the ans? I did not understand the same.
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Re: Tall children can generally reach high shelves easily  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2017, 07:10
arunavamunshi1988 wrote:
Can anybody please explain the ans? I did not understand the same.



(A) attributes a characteristic of an individual member of a group to the group as a whole - Incorrect as it attirbutes a characteristic of the group as a whole, and not of an individual.
(B) presupposes that which is to be proved - There is nothing that needs to be proved as it the author concludes that doing so would confirm the action (Read - Therefore, if short children are taught to reach high shelves easily, the proportion of them who become short adults will decrease. )
(C) refutes a generalization by means of an exceptional case - There has been no exception stated. Hence, irrelavent.
(D) assumes a causal relationship where only a correlation has been indicated - The authour assumes that just because a group if individuals are taught to reach high shelves easily, there can be an assurance that the number of short adults will reduce - which is the casual relation made between the 2 statements, where in reality it is just a correlation that Tall people can reach higher shelves easily than short people. Hence, correct answer. :)
(E) takes lack of evidence for the existence of a state of affairs as evidence that there can be no such state of affairs - Irrelevant.


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Re: Tall children can generally reach high shelves easily  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2017, 08:57
arunavamunshi1988 wrote:
Can anybody please explain the ans? I did not understand the same.

The following posts will clear your doubts -

1. https://gmatclub.com/forum/understandin ... l#p1266775
2. https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/arti ... ion-cr.cfm
3. https://www.powerscore.com/content/prev ... er%207.pdf

Hope this helps...
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Re: Tall children can generally reach high shelves easily  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2017, 21:33
The argument concludes that if short children are taught to reach shelves, they will not grow into short adults ! There is a logical gap between these two statements.

We are supposed to find this error gap ! D fits the bill perfectly - Casual relationship is treated as correlation

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Re: Tall children can generally reach high shelves easily   [#permalink] 01 Jul 2017, 21:33
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