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The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson

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The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2007, 19:49
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A
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D
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35% (01:47) correct 65% (01:01) wrong based on 329 sessions

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The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale provides an estimate of a hurricane’s potential of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings, completely destroy mobile homes, and cause severe window and door damage.
A) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
B) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
C) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
D) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
E) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
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New post 02 Jul 2007, 01:36
D) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
E) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as


both (D) and (E) use the same idioms.

b/w "high enough" and "so high as"....i prefer the later.

Going with (E)
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New post 02 Jul 2007, 12:48
it seems like it is D


determined by - correct idiom


the winds speeds were high enough seems to be the correct usage in this case

"so high as to" implies that it does destroy buildings etc however we just need to know that it is capable of destroying buildings etc. the winds are high enough to destroy buildings

not the winds are so high as to destroy buildings
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OA is E.

OE is given below. So X as to Y is used when stress is on X whereas X is enough to Y is used when stress is on Y

there is a subtle distinction between the idiom "so x as to y" and “x is enough to y.” The original sentence uses the idiom "so x as to y" to indicate that characteristic x is so extreme in the particular case that y results. In contrast, the idiom "x is enough to y" is used when x is the criteria by which an ability to achieve y is measured. Thus, if a sentence stated that "a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough to blow away small buildings," this would convey a different meaning: that wind speeds are the criteria by which one measures the ability to blow away small houses.
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Re: MGMAT SC [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2007, 19:17
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GMATBLACKBELT wrote:
The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale provides an estimate of a hurricane’s potential of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings, completely destroy mobile homes, and cause severe window and door damage.

A. of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as

B. to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough

C. of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as

D. to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough

E. to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as


Correct idioms associated with "potential"

potential TO <VERB>
potential FOR <NOUN>

So A,C are out.

Correct idiom associated with "determined"

is "determined by".

So B out.

Remaining D and E

In E ...so high as is not correct..It should be "as...high..as"

D remains....
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New post 23 Sep 2007, 20:12
X enough to Y is used when X is the criteria by which an ability to achieve Y is measured.

..so X as to Y is used when the characteristic X is so extreme in the particular case that Y results.

(MGMAT SC Book)

I'm inclined to go with E.
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New post 25 Sep 2007, 05:56
You probably dont have the 2007 edition.

It's listed under the heading:

'X enough to Y' Vs. 'So X as to Y' (page 110)
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New post 25 Sep 2007, 18:13
For those who are still confused between D & E.

original sentence:.......a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings.......

D:....... a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough to blow away small buildings.........

E:........a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings.......

original sentence and E says, a category 5 storm has wind speed so extreme that it actually can blow away small buildings.Focus here is on the consequences of high wind speed.

whereas D says, a cat 5 storm has wind speed so high that it is able to blow away small buildings.Here focus is on the wind speed's ability to blow away small buildings.

hope the point is clear.

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Re: Hurricane [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2009, 05:58
bipolarbear wrote:
The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale provides an estimate of a hurricane’s potential of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings, completely destroy mobile homes, and cause severe window and door damage.

a) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
b) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
c) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
d) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
e) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as


There are several things are included in that question.
1) The idiom so X as to (Be ) Y eliminate B and D.
2) The idiom determined by (not determined from) eliminate A
3) X has potential to destroy ( not potential of destroying) eliminate C

....and is primarily and the usage is '';'' is precise .
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Re: SC - Simpson Hurricane [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2011, 11:26
I choose D as well .
I see nothing wrong with D . Infact i dont agree with the OE. so X as to Y is not a correct idiom , If i remember correctly from OG 11 .

I believe this is a MGMAT CAT question and and they have removed this from their CATs because its ambiguous .

http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/post17021.html
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Re: The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson [#permalink]

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New post 20 Feb 2016, 22:12
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mahakmalik wrote:
Please explain why it cannot be B..........High enough is also right.....i suppose so


mahakmalik

Your observation is correct.

The difference between high enough and so high as to does not seem to be a differentiator between a right answer and a wrong one.

There is one more difference, although may not be strong enough to differentiate right from wrong:

Option B uses the idiom "determined from", whereas option E uses "determined by".There is a subtle difference between the two:

X is determined from Y: Y is the information that is used to deduce X.
X is determined by Y: Y is the reason that X is the way it is.

Here X = rating and Y is the wind speed.

Even by this reasoning, it is probably not possible to eliminate choice B.

This problem is a disputed one; the authors have already considered revising the same.
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Re: The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2016, 12:09
ABHISHEK8998 wrote:
OA IS WORNG
As per OG 11th Edition, SC Q33 Page 675, option C) the construction 'so x as to y' is not a correct idiom.

Hence the answer should be D.

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This seems to be the rarest of the rarest occasions, in which contradiction has been observed between 2 GMAT official questions. Please refer to the following official GMAT-prep question, in which the correct answer consist of "so X as to Y":

often-major-economic-shifts-are-so-gradual-as-to-be-74856.html#p560517
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Re: The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2017, 23:55
Can you help me understand this one:
A and C are straight away wrong.
In remaining cases I am not sure if high enough and as high as makes a significant difference.
Lastly in option B and E, its the choice between by and from. It should not be from as rating is not determined from windspeed, it is determined by using wind speed.
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Re: The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2017, 17:59
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
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Re: The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson   [#permalink] 29 Apr 2017, 17:59
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