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The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro

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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2016, 01:06
PrakharGMAT wrote:
Hi Experts/ chetan2u,

Can we eliminate A,C and E on basis of redundancy (Enough +So)...??





Hi chetan2u / daagh ,


Can you please clear my doubt...?


Thanks
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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2016, 06:59
PrakharGMAT
The intent is to say that the costs are excessively high. Whereas, ‘high enough’ means that the costs are high sufficiently. It can be seen that there is a paradox in-built in the phrase ‘high enough’.
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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2016, 10:41
daagh wrote:
PrakharGMAT
The intent is to say that the costs are excessively high. Whereas, ‘high enough’ means that the costs are high sufficiently. It can be seen that there is a paradox in-built in the phrase ‘high enough’.



Hi daagh,

Can you please elaborate....?
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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2016, 18:35
PrakharGMAT wrote:
daagh wrote:
PrakharGMAT
The intent is to say that the costs are excessively high. Whereas, ‘high enough’ means that the costs are high sufficiently. It can be seen that there is a paradox in-built in the phrase ‘high enough’.



Hi daagh,

Can you please elaborate....?


Sense of the sentence when using high enough:
The water bills may NOT be excessively high, but they are high enough so as to raise alarm.
There is a level of cost that raises alarm - the bills are at least above that level.

Sense of the sentence when using so high:
The water bill is excessively high - so high that they raise alarm.
There is a level of cost that raises alarm - the bills are so high that they are above that level.

The blue highlighted portions depict the paradox.

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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2016, 15:57
daagh wrote:
Grammar Point: Only ‘Who’ can be used for humans. ‘Who’ cannot be used anyone or any people other than humans. However, ‘whose’ can be used for humans as well as for other lower animates such as cattle, birds, or so on. ‘Whose’ can also be used for inanimate ones like tables and projects. This is because there is no other word than ‘whose’ that can replace it, while still carrying the possessive meaning. Can you think of any such word?

Some body said costs is the real subject. Nay; it is the projects which is actually the object of the main cluse that becomes the subject of the subordinate clause and gets represented by a relative possessive pronoun ‘whose’, in order to avoid the repetition of saying “projects’”.


How about "of which cost will raise water bills so high that" ?

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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2016, 10:17
tinateng wrote:
daagh wrote:
Grammar Point: Only ‘Who’ can be used for humans. ‘Who’ cannot be used anyone or any people other than humans. However, ‘whose’ can be used for humans as well as for other lower animates such as cattle, birds, or so on. ‘Whose’ can also be used for inanimate ones like tables and projects. This is because there is no other word than ‘whose’ that can replace it, while still carrying the possessive meaning. Can you think of any such word?

Some body said costs is the real subject. Nay; it is the projects which is actually the object of the main cluse that becomes the subject of the subordinate clause and gets represented by a relative possessive pronoun ‘whose’, in order to avoid the repetition of saying “projects’”.


How about "of which cost will raise water bills so high that" ?


"My pen" and "pen of mine" mean the same.

Thus....yes, the construction you posted above makes sense.... :

whose cost: project's cost
cost of which: cost of project.

However it would be preferable to say "cost of which" rather than "of which cost".

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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2016, 23:31
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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2016, 20:57
goodyear2013 wrote:
The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation projects the cost of which raises water bills high enough so that even environmentalists are beginning to raise alarms.

A) the cost of which raises water bills high enough so that
B) at a cost raising water bills so high that
C) at a cost which raises water bills high enough so
D) whose cost will raise water bills so high that
E) whose cost will raise water bills high enough so that

Hi, can anyone explain what is wrong with B & C, please.

in b, at a cost modify proposed, . this modification is not logic
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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2017, 10:24
A. the cost of which raises water bills high enough so that (so that alters the meaning of the sentence. It says government proposed X and Y which raised Z so that .....
B. at a cost raising water bills so high that raising is wrong
C. at a cost which raises water bills high enough so wrong idiom
D. whose cost will raise water bills so high that meaning is right and idiom is used correctly
E. whose cost will raise water bills high enough so that same as error A. Changes the meaning of the sentence

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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2017, 10:38
Guys, I have a doubt. Who decides the meaning of the sentence. I mean, the original sentence says some thing raises something high enough so that some thing happens. Now, E does retain that meaning given remaining arguments, why can't the answer be E

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Re: The city has proposed a number of water treatment and conservation pro   [#permalink] 15 Oct 2017, 10:38

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