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The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and

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The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2006, 09:24
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A
B
C
D
E

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The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Township is not likely to be adjudicated for several years, and, in the meantime, both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other.


(A) both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other

(B) both sides are intent on creating difficulties for each other

(C) each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other

(D) each side is intent on creating difficulties for one another

(E) the sides are both intent on creating difficulties for each other
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2012, 09:36
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The story is: there are X and Y fighting each other from opposite sides like in a tennis game. It is clear that there is no other third party. However, if X and Y both join, whom will they fight with? There is nobody on the other side. This is the crux. Therefore, any choice having - both and each other - is wrong. A, B and E are gone.

(C) each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other --- correct

(D) each side is intent on creating difficulties for one another ---- for one another is usable when more than two are involved. So drop D

C is the pick.

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New post 13 Jul 2006, 18:33
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C

Lesson from sticky by anandnk:

Use each when the parties are more separate, and use both when the parties are collaborating.
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Re: SC - tax dispute  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2006, 19:13
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iced_tea wrote:
The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Township is not likely to be adjudicated for several years, and, in the meantime, both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other.

(A) both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other
(B) both sides are intent on creating difficulties for each other
(C) each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other
(D) each side is intent on creating difficulties for one another
(E) the sides are both intent on creating difficulties for each other


C. "each ......... other" for two nouns.
"each ........ another" for more than two nouns.

"both ...... on each other" is not an idiomatic.
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2010, 23:40
Whats wrong with B?

B is also having each other.
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2010, 00:41
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ykaiim wrote:
Whats wrong with B?

B is also having each other.


The key lie in the context...

If you say >>> both teams working together...>>> It's a positive context
If you say >>> each team is working against other...>>> It's a negative context

I mat not be very clear.. But if understood, it's the key here..
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2010, 01:20
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nightwing79 wrote:
The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Township is not likely to be adjudicated for several years, and, in the meantime, both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other.

A. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other

B. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for each other

C. each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other

D. each side is intent on creating difficulties for one another

E. the sides are both intent on creating difficulties for each other




The intendent meaning is to contrast two disputing parties with the actions of each of them in the meantime.

one another is used when we are talking about things, ppl more than 2
each other - when only two sides are implied
for the other - when we intend to affect someone/something other outside of a group

so , answer is C.
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2010, 01:52
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I think I go it.

For two parties both EACH...OTHER and EACH OTHER are correct option. In (C):
each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other [side]

The SIDE is removed in the end of the choice.
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2010, 08:11
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I am still confused about what is wrong in A and B....:(...can someone please explain

Does the word 'other' and 'each other' in option A and B refer to third parties?...also is the word 'both' referred incorrectly in both A and B?...are these the reasons for A and B to be wrong?

The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Township is not likely to be adjudicated for several years, and, in the meantime, both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other.

A. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other

B. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for each other

C. each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other

D. each side is intent on creating difficulties for one another - one another should be used for a group of more than 2 people or things

E. the sides are both intent on creating difficulties for each other - awkward
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2010, 08:56
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seekmba wrote:
I am still confused about what is wrong in A and B....:(...can someone please explain

Does the word 'other' and 'each other' in option A and B refer to third parties?...also is the word 'both' referred incorrectly in both A and B?...are these the reasons for A and B to be wrong?

The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Township is not likely to be adjudicated for several years, and, in the meantime, both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other.

A. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other

B. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for each other

C. each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other

D. each side is intent on creating difficulties for one another - one another should be used for a group of more than 2 people or things

E. the sides are both intent on creating difficulties for each other - awkward


see my post
The intendent meaning is to contrast two disputing parties with the actions of each of them in the meantime. I mean that first part of the sentence describes the dispute between two parties, second part says [intends to contrast] that each of them intent on creating difficulties.

Both is wrong here because:
both (Cambridge Dictionary) - (referring to) two people or things together! Here they compete against each other.

each other - used to show that each person in a group of two people does something to the other
other - refers to 3rd parties outside the group.

gimme kudos ))
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2010, 07:10
Pkit wrote:
seekmba wrote:
I am still confused about what is wrong in A and B....:(...can someone please explain

Does the word 'other' and 'each other' in option A and B refer to third parties?...also is the word 'both' referred incorrectly in both A and B?...are these the reasons for A and B to be wrong?

The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Township is not likely to be adjudicated for several years, and, in the meantime, both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other.

A. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other

B. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for each other

C. each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other

D. each side is intent on creating difficulties for one another - one another should be used for a group of more than 2 people or things

E. the sides are both intent on creating difficulties for each other - awkward


see my post
The intendent meaning is to contrast two disputing parties with the actions of each of them in the meantime. I mean that first part of the sentence describes the dispute between two parties, second part says [intends to contrast] that each of them intent on creating difficulties.

Both is wrong here because:
both (Cambridge Dictionary) - (referring to) two people or things together! Here they compete against each other.

each other - used to show that each person in a group of two people does something to the other
other - refers to 3rd parties outside the group.

gimme kudos ))


I think I got what the wrong with B: "both" and "each other" have the same meaning so is redundant.

But I am still not clear what is the problem with A


A. both sides(together both ) are intent on creating difficulties for the other (third party )

how is this different from C ?
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2010, 07:55
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jn.mohit wrote:

I think I got what the wrong with B: "both" and "each other" have the same meaning so is redundant.

But I am still not clear what is the problem with A


A. both sides(together both ) are intent on creating difficulties for the other (third party )

how is this different from C ?



Look, Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Township are enemies they compete against each other. If for example third company XYZ would appear, one of competitors either Mall or Harris (let it be Mall) if form an alliance with XYZ, they together (both of them) would create difficulties for the other (Harris).

Given the example, only two parties are presented and they compete against each other, and not together.

Hope it helps,

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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Tow  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2011, 09:35
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In the context, between the use of ‘both sides’ and ‘each side’, I believe that ‘each side’ is to be preferred. Using ‘both sides’ may lead to the unintentional distortion in meaning that both sides are jointly planning something. A, B and E are out.

Between C and D, E is faulty for using ‘one another’, which I think is usable for a set of more than two, while the usage of 'for the other' in C is straight. C is the best.
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Tow  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2011, 06:10
But choice "B" clearly states that "both sides......for...each other..." I don't think that the sentence here portray "both sides" as a clubbed entity!!
ur views??

daagh wrote:
In the context, between the use of ‘both sides’ and ‘each side’, I believe that ‘each side’ is to be preferred. Using ‘both sides’ may lead to the unintentional distortion in meaning that both sides are jointly planning something. A, B and E are out.

Between C and D, E is faulty for using ‘one another’, which I think is usable for a set of more than two, while the usage of 'for the other' in C is straight. C is the best.

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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Tow  [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2011, 15:53
MSDHONI wrote:
But choice "B" clearly states that "both sides......for...each other..." I don't think that the sentence here portray "both sides" as a clubbed entity!!
ur views??


google this question and you will find instructor opinions on this question, here is a snippet from Ron:
i agree that (c) is the best of these choices, but i don't see a good reason why (b) is definitively wrong - it's just not as "pretty" as (c).
what's the source of this problem? why doesn't anyone ever say where these problems are from?
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Re: both sides - each side  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2012, 17:55
A - 'both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other'. If 'both sides' (i.e. the two sides together) are creating difficulties, there in no 'other' left for them to create difficulties for. Incorrect.

C - 'each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other'. For each side, 'other' is the side not mentioned, and they are creating difficulties for that side. Correct.

C it is.
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Tow  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2015, 21:54
MSDHONI wrote:
Image


not problem of preference

if we you "each other", "both' is redundant

"if we use "one another", there are more than 3 person

all other choices but C aquire the above errors.
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2016, 22:29
Can someone shed a light between B and C?
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2016, 07:50
Aves wrote:
Can someone shed a light between B and C?


Correct: EACH side is intent... on THE OTHER. [THE OTHER refers to the second party.]
Correct: BOTH sides are intent... on EACH OTHER. [EACH OTHER or ONE ANOTHER designates a reciprocal relation between two (or more) entities]

Wrong: BOTH sides are intent... on THE OTHER. [There is no third OTHER party here.]
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Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2016, 06:50
sayantanc2k wrote:
Aves wrote:
Can someone shed a light between B and C?


Correct: EACH side is intent... on THE OTHER. [THE OTHER refers to the second party.]
Correct: BOTH sides are intent... on EACH OTHER. [EACH OTHER or ONE ANOTHER designates a reciprocal relation between two (or more) entities]

Wrong: BOTH sides are intent... on THE OTHER. [There is no third OTHER party here.]


Hi sayantanc2k,

The option B Says " Both sides are intent ...for each other" (not the other)

The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and Harris Township is not likely to be adjudicated for several years, and, in the meantime, both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other.

A. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for the other

B. both sides are intent on creating difficulties for each other

C. each side is intent on creating difficulties for the other


Are you referring to the difference in the preposition on & for?

Do you think we can eliminate the choices by following reasoning :
Each is for separate groups & both is for collaborativery groups

I fell for B. :(
Re: The complex tax dispute between the Covered Bridge Mall and &nbs [#permalink] 27 Jun 2016, 06:50

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