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The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s

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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2016, 07:52
daagh wrote:
Stelle wrote

Quote:
I still don't get the rule. Could someone please explain when to use "claim to be" and when to use "claim is"?
I am pretty sure I have heard sentences like "She claims to be the king's daughter", and cannot understand on what context it becomes "claims is the king's daughter".


The answer lies how confident the company is about the claim; if the company feels very confident, then it can forthrightly declare that ‘it claims is’. On the contrary, if it is a little hesitant, then it might say that ‘it claims to be’; however both expressions are correct in their own right. Only thing, in the current context, ‘claims is’ more appropriate since the company is quite in candid its claim.





Sir the information you presented above is quite an eye opener. but i would like to draw your attention to the later half of the sentence. In the OA, "as long as" is used to present the length of a computer. is that usage not wrong? How can " as long as" signify length of an object?
As per my knowledge " as long as" is used in 3 scenarios
1. For the duration
2. On the condition that
3. for emphasis before number

Requesting you to please elaborate the solution.
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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2016, 09:18
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aamir89 wrote:
daagh wrote:
Stelle wrote

Quote:
I still don't get the rule. Could someone please explain when to use "claim to be" and when to use "claim is"?
I am pretty sure I have heard sentences like "She claims to be the king's daughter", and cannot understand on what context it becomes "claims is the king's daughter".


The answer lies how confident the company is about the claim; if the company feels very confident, then it can forthrightly declare that ‘it claims is’. On the contrary, if it is a little hesitant, then it might say that ‘it claims to be’; however both expressions are correct in their own right. Only thing, in the current context, ‘claims is’ more appropriate since the company is quite in candid its claim.





Sir the information you presented above is quite an eye opener. but i would like to draw your attention to the later half of the sentence. In the OA, "as long as" is used to present the length of a computer. is that usage not wrong? How can " as long as" signify length of an object?
As per my knowledge " as long as" is used in 3 scenarios
1. For the duration
2. On the condition that
3. for emphasis before number

Requesting you to please elaborate the solution.


You are referring to the idiomatic use of the phrase "as long as". However here "as long as" is not used as a single idiom.

Here a different idiom " as..as.." is used. The structure of this idiom is:
as+adjective+as+ clause/noun ( the adjective need not be "long" - it could be any adjective including "long".)

He is as tall as I am.
This bench is as long as that bench.
This dish is not as tasty as the one we had last time.

Note that the usage "as long as" in the second example is not as the idiom "as long as" , but as the idiom " as... as...".
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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2016, 23:55
Ques- The electronics company has unveiled what it claims "to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder......". In the sentence containing Claims, should it be followed by To be or can is be also used? As in "what it claims is the world's smallest..."


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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 29 Dec 2016, 11:57
piyush_89 wrote:
Ques- The electronics company has unveiled what it claims "to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder......". In the sentence containing Claims, should it be followed by To be or can is be also used? As in "what it claims is the world's smallest..."

Dear piyush_89,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

You may be interested in GMAT Idiom Flashcards.

The verb "to claim" is a transitive verb, that is, a verb that takes a direct object. This direct object can be a simple noun:
The suspect claims innocence.
The settler claimed the land by the river.

More interesting usages, such as are likely on the GMAT SC, involve something "noun-like" taking the place of a noun. This could be
a) a "that" clause (technically known as a substantive clause)
b) an infinitive phrase
Thus, we could correctly say:
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder ... (infinitive direct object)
or
The electronics company claims that it has just unveiled the world's smallest network digital camcorder ... ("that"-clause direct object)

The following construction would not work on the GMAT:
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims is the world's smallest network digital camcorder . . .
This would be typical in American colloquial English, but grammatically, it's sloppy. It's very informal and would never be acceptable on the GMAT.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2017, 22:56
That was nice detailed explanation. Thanks. However, in a collection of SC posts, the OA was what you term as incorrect,i.e. what it claims is....


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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2017, 11:01
D is the correct answer. In B and C, 'which' is wrongly modifying the world.
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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2017, 04:38
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs less than 11 ounces.

'X' claims to be the world’s smallest network digital camcorder.RIGHT
The electronics company claims to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder WRONG.
A. to be the world's smallest network digital camcorder, the length of which is that of a handheld computer, and it weighs

B. to be the smallest network digital camcorder in the world, which is as long as a handheld computer, weighing
world's MISSING.

C. is the smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld cmoputer and weighs
world's MISSING.
D. is the world's smallest network digital camcorder, which is as long as a handheld computer and weighs
CORRECT.
E. is the world's smalles network digital camcorder, the lenght of which is that of a handheld computer, weighing
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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2017, 04:57
Hi Expert,
Can you please explain why D and not E?
Claims to be is the right idiom why is claim is being used in this?
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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 14 Oct 2017, 10:20
StrugglingGmat2910 wrote:
Hi Expert,
Can you please explain why D and not E?
Claims to be is the right idiom why is claim is being used in this?

This issue has already been covered in quite a bit of detail above. Start with @daagh's post at this link: https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-electron ... l#p1554895, then read the ensuing discussion from there -- plenty of very sharp members have offered their views. The short version: there's certainly no rule that dictates that "claims to be" is correct and "claims is" is wrong.
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The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jan 2018, 22:34
I have a doubt

Is the use of " world's smallest network digital camcorder " correct???

For example

Right usage : Month of festival
Wrong usage : Festival's month

Similarly, wont "world's smallest network digital camcorder" be incorrect?
instead it should have been The smallest network digital camcorder in the world

Note : My concern is not regarding the use of "which" .... I got that part

Please help!!
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Re: The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2018, 13:09
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MSarmah wrote:
I have a doubt

Is the use of " world's smallest network digital camcorder " correct???

For example

Right usage : Month of festival
Wrong usage : Festival's month

Similarly, wont "world's smallest network digital camcorder" be incorrect?
instead it should have been The smallest network digital camcorder in the world

Note : My concern is not regarding the use of "which" .... I got that part

Please help!!

Hm, yeah - when you put it that way, the GMAT does look a little bit inconsistent on this. (And for anybody who doesn't recognize it, the reference to the "festival's month" vs. "the month of the festival" is in this OG question: https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-olympic- ... 85874.html.)

But here's the thing: nobody would ever claim that it's an absolute rule that the possessive version ("festival's month" or "world's smallest digital camcorder") is always wrong, and that the version with a preposition is always right ("month of the festival", "smallest digital camcorder in the world"). You just have to think about whether the possessive plausibly makes sense:

  • "the festival's month" --> In what sense does the festival somehow "possess" the month? I don't think that makes sense.
  • "the world's smallest camcorder" --> Personally, I'd prefer the phrase "the smallest camcorder in the world", but I don't think it's WRONG to say "the world's smallest camcorder." In some sense, the world "possesses"... well, everything in the world. So this isn't completely illogical.

And more importantly: you're never looking for a perfect sentence on the GMAT, just the BEST of five flawed sentences. In other words, find the four sentences that contain the most serious errors (more on this in our beginner's guide to SC). In the question about "the month of the festival", the difference between "the festival's month" and "the month of the festival" isn't the only difference between answer choices (B) and (D) -- there's arguably another reason why the answer is what it is. And as you recognized, there are definitely bigger issues ("which"!) in some of the answer choices in this thread, too.

Bottom line: the form of the possessive is not an absolute rule, though it certainly could affect meaning. And it's hard to come up with official examples in which the difference in the form of the possessive is the ONLY issue, or even the main issue.

I hope this helps!
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The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2018, 16:22
GMATNinja wrote:
MSarmah wrote:
I have a doubt

Is the use of " world's smallest network digital camcorder " correct???

For example

Right usage : Month of festival
Wrong usage : Festival's month

Similarly, wont "world's smallest network digital camcorder" be incorrect?
instead it should have been The smallest network digital camcorder in the world

Note : My concern is not regarding the use of "which" .... I got that part

Please help!!

Hm, yeah - when you put it that way, the GMAT does look a little bit inconsistent on this. (And for anybody who doesn't recognize it, the reference to the "festival's month" vs. "the month of the festival" is in this OG question: https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-olympic- ... 85874.html.)

But here's the thing: nobody would ever claim that it's an absolute rule that the possessive version ("festival's month" or "world's smallest digital camcorder") is always wrong, and that the version with a preposition is always right ("month of the festival", "smallest digital camcorder in the world"). You just have to think about whether the possessive plausibly makes sense:

  • "the festival's month" --> In what sense does the festival somehow "possess" the month? I don't think that makes sense.
  • "the world's smallest camcorder" --> Personally, I'd prefer the phrase "the smallest camcorder in the world", but I don't think it's WRONG to say "the world's smallest camcorder." In some sense, the world "possesses"... well, everything in the world. So this isn't completely illogical.

And more importantly: you're never looking for a perfect sentence on the GMAT, just the BEST of five flawed sentences. In other words, find the four sentences that contain the most serious errors (more on this in our beginner's guide to SC). In the question about "the month of the festival", the difference between "the festival's month" and "the month of the festival" isn't the only difference between answer choices (B) and (D) -- there's arguably another reason why the answer is what it is. And as you recognized, there are definitely bigger issues ("which"!) in some of the answer choices in this thread, too.

Bottom line: the form of the possessive is not an absolute rule, though it certainly could affect meaning. And it's hard to come up with official examples in which the difference in the form of the possessive is the ONLY issue, or even the main issue.

I hope this helps!


Thanks a lot GmatNinja !! :)
The electronics company has unveiled what it claims to be the world’s   [#permalink] 22 Jan 2018, 16:22

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