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The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a presiden

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Re: The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a presiden [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2016, 05:10
WE can solve this question on simple grammar.
A. pronoun that cannot refer to people
B. error-free
C. cars who traveled is absurd.
D. A flagrant fragment
E. Cars traveling is absurd.
No need to break the head on meaning or any other
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Re: The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a presiden [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2016, 20:58
parsifal wrote:
The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a president, a senator, and a governor that had been traveling to Washington, D.C. together on the Liberty Express in 1907.

A)The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a president, a senator, and a governor that had been traveling

B)The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a president, a senator, and a governor, who traveled

C)A president, a senator, and a governor were the first political passengers on modern railroad cars who traveled

D)A president, a senator, and a governor who were the first political passengers on modern railroad cars to travel

E)A president, a senator, and a governor were the first political passengers on modern railroad cars traveling



I am extremely doubtful of the OA. Here is why:
The "who traveled" is placed after the comma, which means it is used as a non-restrictive modifier.
According to the rule, whatever is contained in the non-restrictive modifier has no bearing on the overall content of the sentence. In other words, we can completely ignore it. When this rule is applied, I get an impression that the fact those personnel traveled is completely indepdent of the fact that they were the first passengers.

Going over to C, I can't seem to figure out why "who traveled" classes cannot modify passengers. Note that the railroad cars are the object of the preposition "on". To illustrate, it would look like this passengers (on railroad cars) who traveled.

What are your thoughts on this guys?

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Re: The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a presiden [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2016, 06:22
mjhoon1004 wrote:
parsifal wrote:
The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a president, a senator, and a governor that had been traveling to Washington, D.C. together on the Liberty Express in 1907.

A)The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a president, a senator, and a governor that had been traveling

B)The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a president, a senator, and a governor, who traveled

C)A president, a senator, and a governor were the first political passengers on modern railroad cars who traveled

D)A president, a senator, and a governor who were the first political passengers on modern railroad cars to travel

E)A president, a senator, and a governor were the first political passengers on modern railroad cars traveling



I am extremely doubtful of the OA. Here is why:
The "who traveled" is placed after the comma, which means it is used as a non-restrictive modifier.
According to the rule, whatever is contained in the non-restrictive modifier has no bearing on the overall content of the sentence. In other words, we can completely ignore it. When this rule is applied, I get an impression that the fact those personnel traveled is completely independent of the fact that they were the first passengers.

Going over to C, I can't seem to figure out why "who traveled" classes cannot modify passengers. Note that the railroad cars are the object of the preposition "on". To illustrate, it would look like this passengers (on railroad cars) who traveled.

What are your thoughts on this guys?


In option B the modifier who traveled...... is indeed a non-essential (non-restrictive) modifier. This modifier states something extra about the travelers. We are not identifying the political travelers among other political travelers using this modifier. Removing the modifier does not change the meaning of the sentence. Hence usage of this modifier as a non-restrictive modifier is correct. (The fact stated in the non-restrictive modifier may or may not have bearing to the main clause; stating something related to the main clause does not make the modifier an essential one)

A relative pronoun may refer to a noun which is an object of preposition. Hence in option C, the relative pronoun who may as well refer to cars which is closest to it (although who is not the correct relative pronoun for inanimate objects).

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Re: The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a presiden [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2017, 19:48
https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-first-po ... 29174.html
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Re: The first political passengers on modern railroad cars were a presiden   [#permalink] 16 Oct 2017, 19:48

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