GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 16 Dec 2018, 07:16

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Prep Hour

     December 16, 2018

     December 16, 2018

     03:00 PM EST

     04:00 PM EST

    Strategies and techniques for approaching featured GMAT topics
  • FREE Quant Workshop by e-GMAT!

     December 16, 2018

     December 16, 2018

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Get personalized insights on how to achieve your Target Quant Score.

The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Jul 2009
Posts: 258
The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 26 May 2018, 04:52
2
3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

42% (02:11) correct 58% (02:09) wrong based on 202 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are inherently more liberal than unwritten ones is false. No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied. Properly understood, then, a constitution is the sum of those procedures through which the power of the state is legitimately exercised and limited. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

If the statements in the argument are all true, which one of the following must also be true on the basis of them?
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.

Originally posted by angel2009 on 25 Mar 2010, 07:15.
Last edited by gmatbusters on 26 May 2018, 04:52, edited 1 time in total.
Added OA
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Oct 2009
Posts: 168
Concentration: General Management, Sustainability
WE: Consulting (Computer Software)
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Mar 2010, 12:09
IMO it is B.
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
>> weakens the argument.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.
>> Yes, until it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way constitution seems to be not liberal.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
>> Not relevant
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
>> This is mentioned as false in the argument.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.
>> This is the the same sentense that appears in argument.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2004
Posts: 147
Location: Singapore
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Mar 2010, 19:29
The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are inherently more liberal than unwritten ones is false. No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied. Properly understood, then, a constitution is the sum of those procedures through which the power of the state is legitimately exercised and limited. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

If the statements in the argument are all true, which one of the following must also be true on the basis of them?
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.
The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are inherently more liberal than unwritten ones is false. No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied. Properly understood, then, a constitution is the sum of those procedures through which the power of the state is legitimately exercised and limited. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

If the statements in the argument are all true, which one of the following must also be true on the basis of them?
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
-- Exaggrated viewpoint, not mentioned in stimulus.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.
-- "Impossible" is too extreme viewpoint not suported by stimulus.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
-- Advantages not mentined in the stimulus.
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
Not suggested anywhere in stimulus.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.
This being "must be true" question, this statement is supported by last sentence of the stimulus. This shall be correct answer.

What is the OA?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2009
Posts: 96
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Mar 2010, 19:45
E is a paraphrase of the conclusion in the last sentence of the argument..hence E

OA please
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Mar 2007
Posts: 44
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Mar 2010, 09:15
angel2009 wrote:
The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are inherently more liberal than unwritten ones is false. No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied. Properly understood, then, a constitution is the sum of those procedures through which the power of the state is legitimately exercised and limited. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

If the statements in the argument are all true, which one of the following must also be true on the basis of them?
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.


Going with E. Its the conclusion restated.OA pls.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 18 Aug 2009
Posts: 358
Schools: UT at Austin, Indiana State University, UC at Berkeley
WE 1: 5.5
WE 2: 5.5
WE 3: 6.0
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Mar 2010, 22:10
IMO B.
E is just the paraphrasing of the conclusion of the statement, so I believe, it should not be the answer.
_________________

Never give up,,,

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 755
WE 1: 3.5 yrs IT
WE 2: 2.5 yrs Retail chain
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 May 2010, 23:33
E is runner up. B is correct, though extreme language.

1 No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied.
2. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

Using No and Only when makes this choice correct.
Tricky.

angel2009 wrote:
The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are inherently more liberal than unwritten ones is false. No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied. Properly understood, then, a constitution is the sum of those procedures through which the power of the state is legitimately exercised and limited. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

If the statements in the argument are all true, which one of the following must also be true on the basis of them?
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.

_________________

Want to improve your CR: http://gmatclub.com/forum/cr-methods-an-approach-to-find-the-best-answers-93146.html
Tricky Quant problems: http://gmatclub.com/forum/50-tricky-questions-92834.html
Important Grammer Fundamentals: http://gmatclub.com/forum/key-fundamentals-of-grammer-our-crucial-learnings-on-sc-93659.html

VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 17 Feb 2010
Posts: 1111
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Jun 2010, 18:13
I did not like B because it has strong word "impossible"....hence picked (E)
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 24 Dec 2009
Posts: 182
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2010, 12:09
Two MUST BE CORRECT answers in 'Must be True' questions -

a. If the answer choice restates part of stimulus as it is or in similar way.
b. Combination of two or more parts of stimulus are restated.

Answer is E. Answer choice E falls under 'a' category. It restates a part of stimulus.

A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one. Completely new information is provided. No where mentioned in stimulus.

(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.Too strong. Red flag the word - It is impossible.

(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution. --- completely new information.

(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written. Opposite idea of stimulus provided.

(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Posts: 28
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Feb 2011, 07:30
angel2009 wrote:
The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are inherently more liberal than unwritten ones is false. No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied. Properly understood, then, a constitution is the sum of those procedures through which the power of the state is legitimately exercised and limited. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

If the statements in the argument are all true, which one of the following must also be true on the basis of them?
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.



I,ll go with E)
Please post the OA along with the question that you are asking.

Thanks,
-V
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: 2000 posts! I don't know whether I should feel great or sad about it! LOL
Joined: 04 Oct 2009
Posts: 1171
Location: Peru
Schools: Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, MIT & HKS (Government)
WE 1: Economic research
WE 2: Banking
WE 3: Government: Foreign Trade and SMEs
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Feb 2011, 14:33
+1 B

E cannot be correct because interpretation is insufficient; it is necessary to apply the constitution.
_________________

"Life’s battle doesn’t always go to stronger or faster men; but sooner or later the man who wins is the one who thinks he can."

My Integrated Reasoning Logbook / Diary: http://gmatclub.com/forum/my-ir-logbook-diary-133264.html

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Director
Director
avatar
Status: Impossible is not a fact. It's an opinion. It's a dare. Impossible is nothing.
Affiliations: University of Chicago Booth School of Business
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 739
Reviews Badge
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Feb 2011, 21:33
Missed that :wink: ! I see where it is going. thanks.

metallicafan wrote:
E cannot be correct because interpretation is insufficient; it is necessary to apply the constitution.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 14 Dec 2010
Posts: 139
Location: India
Concentration: Technology, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 680 Q44 V39
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Feb 2011, 03:12
I fell for it. E is a shell game answer. B is the correct answer, notwithstanding the strong wording.

Edit: OA please
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: Still Struggling
Joined: 02 Nov 2010
Posts: 120
Location: India
GMAT Date: 10-15-2011
GPA: 3.71
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Feb 2011, 04:13
IMO, B

The reason being the the last line implies that constitution becomes liberal only when is it interpreted and applied in a liberal way.
Option B uses 'merely' to depict that application of the constitution DOES play a role in determining the nature of the constitution.


Quote:
The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are inherently more liberal than unwritten ones is false. No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied. Properly understood, then, a constitution is the sum of those procedures through which the power of the state is legitimately exercised and limited. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

If the statements in the argument are all true, which one of the following must also be true on the basis of them?
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.


Wats the OA??
_________________

Appreciation in KUDOS please!
Knewton Free Test 10/03 - 710 (49/37)
Princeton Free Test 10/08 - 610 (44/31)
Kaplan Test 1- 10/10 - 630
Veritas Prep- 10/11 - 630 (42/37)
MGMAT 1 - 10/12 - 680 (45/34)

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Sep 2010
Posts: 129
Nationality: Indian
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, General Management
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Feb 2011, 20:19
1
OA is B. Taken from Barron's LSAT. ( googled it ).

E) is true because the argument says that it is liberal constitution only when interpreted in a liberal way. The option however says "if its possible to interpret in a liberal way". Possibility of interpretation does not equal the actual interpretation. It has to be interpreted, not just whether the possibility exists or not.
_________________

You have to have a darkness...for the dawn to come.

Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 23 Apr 2010
Posts: 547
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Dec 2011, 04:57
This question is from an Official LSAT Exam. The OA is B.

(E) is wrong, as stated above by metallicafan, because in order for a constitution to be liberal it must be interpreted AND applied in a liberal way:

Quote:
Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted AND applied in a liberal way.


Moreover, the quoted sentence above mentions written constitutions, whereas (E) talks about all constitutions.
Retired Moderator
avatar
Status: Flying over the cloud!
Joined: 16 Aug 2011
Posts: 613
Location: Viet Nam
Concentration: International Business, Marketing
GMAT Date: 06-06-2014
GPA: 3.07
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Dec 2011, 19:06
angel2009 wrote:
The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are inherently more liberal than unwritten ones is false. No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied. Properly understood, then, a constitution is the sum of those procedures through which the power of the state is legitimately exercised and limited. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

If the statements in the argument are all true, which one of the following must also be true on the basis of them?
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.


Choice E is correct repeated in the argument.
_________________

CR: Focus of the Week: Must be True Question

Intern
Intern
avatar
S
Joined: 31 Jul 2015
Posts: 34
Location: India
Premium Member
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 May 2016, 15:23
This problem is quite an old one , but in my opinion the explanations given above are missing something crucial.

There is a debate between option B and E. I think both option A and B uses extreme words and uses the words "careful analysis" that doesn't hold any significant meaning as far as the question goes. Option A and B plays the shell game by saying "careful analysis of the written text" while one should actually look for, written text that are " interpreted and applied".

So option E in my opinion is the only possible answer.

Thank you :)
_________________

Never give up !

Senior DS Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 27 Oct 2017
Posts: 1138
Location: India
Concentration: International Business, General Management
GPA: 3.64
WE: Business Development (Energy and Utilities)
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 May 2018, 04:51
Must Be True-SN. The correct answer choice is (B)

Answer choice (A): Since a constitution becomes liberal or otherwise ONLY WHEN it is interpreted and applied in a liberal fashion, a careful analysis of written text is definitely not sufficient to show whether or not a constitution is liberal, and this choice is wrong. If you eliminated this choice because the stimulus did not discuss what proves that a constitution is not liberal, you got away with one. The second and third sentences establish that a constitution has no nature until it is interpreted and applied. Those conditions remain necessary for any interpretation, not merely the one mentioned in the last sentence.

Answer choice (B): This is the correct answer choice, and is exactly what the stimulus is driving at in the last sentence. It is necessary that we observe both interpretation and application before we can tell that a written constitution is liberal, so analysis is not enough.

Answer choice (C): The stimulus never suggested that written or unwritten constitutions were better, and no comparison between them could be justified by the stimulus, so this choice is incorrect.

Answer choice (D): There is no information in the stimulus that leads to this conclusion, and this choice is incorrect. You should not assume that unwritten constitutions require less interpretation, or are more likely to be liberal, when the stimulus has not given you any information about such constitutions.

Answer choice (E): Since a constitution is liberal only after actual interpretation and application, mere possibility does not make a constitution liberal, and this choice is wrong. Also, this choice could be contradictory to the main point of the stimulus. If this choice were true, certain constitutions might be inherently more liberal than others.

Source: https://forum.powerscore.com/lsat/viewtopic.php?t=8845
_________________

Win GMAT CLUB Test- Weekly Quant Quiz Contest
Weekly Quant Quiz Questions- Direct Download
SC: Confusable words

All you need for Quant, GMAT PS Question Directory,GMAT DS Question Directory
Error log/Key Concepts
Combination Concept: Division into groups
Question of the Day (QOTD)
Free GMAT CATS

Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 26 Aug 2016
Posts: 628
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, Marketing
GMAT 1: 690 Q50 V33
GMAT 2: 700 Q50 V33
GMAT 3: 730 Q51 V38
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Jul 2018, 04:18
The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are inherently more liberal than unwritten ones is false. No written constitution is more than a paper with words on it until those words are both interpreted and applied. Properly understood, then, a constitution is the sum of those procedures through which the power of the state is legitimately exercised and limited. Therefore, even a written constitution becomes a liberal constitution only when it is interpreted and applied in a liberal way.

If the statements in the argument are all true, which one of the following must also be true on the basis of them?
(A) A careful analysis of the written text of a constitution can show that the constitution is not a liberal one.
(B) It is impossible to determine that a written constitution is liberal merely through careful analysis of the written text. - CORRECT - They are not more than paper and pen until they are interpreted and applied.
(C) There are no advantages to having a written rather than an unwritten constitution.
(D) Constitutions that are not written are more likely to be liberal than are constitutions that are written.
(E) A constitution is a liberal constitution if it is possible to interpret it in a liberal way.
-
NOT ONLY INTERPRET BUT ALSO APPLIED.

Answer should be B rather than E. because of highlightened text.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are &nbs [#permalink] 03 Jul 2018, 04:18
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The frequently expressed view that written constitutions are

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.