It is currently 21 Oct 2017, 05:48

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

1 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 26 Jul 2009
Posts: 343

Kudos [?]: 121 [1], given: 32

The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Sep 2009, 18:00
1
This post received
KUDOS
28
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

47% (00:54) correct 53% (01:07) wrong based on 4325 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Edit: There is a modified version of this question in HERE


The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970's.

(A) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than
(B) extinction; its numbers are now five times more than
(C) extinction, their numbers now fivefold what they were
(D) extinction, now with fivefold the numbers they had
(E) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than what they were
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by broall on 28 May 2017, 20:36, edited 4 times in total.
Reformatted question

Kudos [?]: 121 [1], given: 32

Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 16 Jan 2009
Posts: 186

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 62

Location: Ithaca, New York
Schools: Cornell University - The Johnson School
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Sep 2009, 18:53
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
boeinz wrote:
The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970's.
(A) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than
(B) extinction; its numbers are now five times more than
(C) extinction, their numbers now fivefold what they were
(D) extinction, now with fivefold the numbers they had
(E) extinction, now with numbers five times greater than

Please provide explanations. Thanks.


I think "when" shouldn't be underlined. If so, then all the answer choices don't make sense in my opinion. I think this question tests two areas pronouns and idioms. The subject is "gyrfalcon", which is singular so let's look at the answer choices ...

A) I like this answer because it is idiomatic and has the correct pronoun.

B) "Five times more" doesn't seem to be idiomatic.

C) "Their" and "they" are both pronouns that refer to a plural noun. The gyrfalcon is singular so this one is incorrect. Plus, the fivefold phrase seems unidiomatic.

D) Again pronoun "they" is not in agreement.

E) There is no pronoun worries with this one and the phrase five times greater is idiomatic but the phrase after the comma modifies extinction so I'll toss this one out too.

I'll go with A. What's the OA?

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 62

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2009
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 138 [0], given: 13

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2009, 12:53
I am confused between A and E.

Comparison between numbers now and numbers in early 1970's. Going by pre-edited option E, only A makes sense. Now if A can be right means option A has what they were implicitly in it.
its numbers are now five times greater than[what they were] when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970's.

In post-edited version of this question, we have choice E, in which what they were is explicitly mentioned. Choice A has what they were implicitly mentioned.

Both A and E looks grammatically correct. On concision basis, I would go with A.

Could someone throw some light on this question?

Kudos [?]: 138 [0], given: 13

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2009
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 138 [0], given: 13

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Sep 2009, 11:42
Instead of opening a new thread, I am again posting the original question and slightly modified version. Please explain your reasoning for right and wrong choices.

Original question:
The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970's.
(A) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than
(B) extinction; its numbers are now five times more than
(C) extinction, their numbers now fivefold what they were
(D) extinction, now with fivefold the numbers they had
(E) extinction, now with numbers five times greater than

Slightly modified question (answer choice E is modified)

The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970's.
(A) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than
(B) extinction; its numbers are now five times more than
(C) extinction, their numbers now fivefold what they were
(D) extinction, now with fivefold the numbers they had
(E) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than what they were

Kudos [?]: 138 [0], given: 13

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2009
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 138 [0], given: 13

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Sep 2009, 17:37
Quote:
Aah ok .. so if you look at the statement and you read "greater than when the use of DDT was ... " , it becomes apparent why this statement is wrong. "greater than" is a comparative phrase and you need two entities to compare to. So here 'numbers' should have 'numbers' to be compared with. Hence Option E is the correct answer as 'what they were' clearly signifies numbers. Hope this helps.


pleonasm, thanks for the explanation. This is exactly what I had in my mind. But for the original question, which is a OG 10 question, I found below explanation.

OE: A, the best choice, uses a singular pronoun, its, to refer to the singular antecedent The gyrfalcon, and it
properly uses the construction its numbers are now ... greater than. In B, the construction its numbers are ...
more is not idiomatic: there are more birds, but not more numbers. Choices C and D use a plural pronoun, their
or they, to refer to a grammatically singular antecedent, The gyrfalcon. Choices D and E wrongly use a phrase
introduced by now with to modify The gyrfalcon. In both choices, the phrase confusingly seems to parallel with
extinction; a new clause with a present tense verb is needed to state what the gyrfalcon's numbers are now.

OE didn't even bother to mention about comparison of numbers to numbers. Not sure how they compared numbers to when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970's.

Kudos [?]: 138 [0], given: 13

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Nov 2009
Posts: 11

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 2

Location: Israel
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2009, 16:10
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Hello,

The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970’s.

(A) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than
(B) extinction; its numbers are now five times more than
(C) extinction, their numbers now fivefold what they were
(D) extinction, now with fivefold the numbers they had
(E) extinction, now with numbers five times greater than

My question is which rule enables using "extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than" rather than "extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than they were". To me "they were" seems like missing from the OA ("A").

Thanks,

superfreak

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 2

4 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Aug 2009
Posts: 53

Kudos [?]: 24 [4], given: 19

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2009, 20:28
4
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970’s.

(A) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than
(B) extinction; its numbers are now five times more than
(C) extinction, their numbers now fivefold what they were
(D) extinction, now with fivefold the numbers they had
(E) extinction, now with numbers five times greater than

Primarily we need to understand that with GMAT we need to pick the best from the options available to us.

By POE we can eliminate the following:
C- "their numbers" does not match with the singularity of "the gryfalcon"
D- the same reason as C
E- numbers does not refer to anything specific.

We are now stuck with A & B . Now its between "greater than" and "more than".
When comparing number we do not say four is more than two, instead we say four is greater than two".
In this context we are comparing numbers hence we can eliminate B too.
So A is the OA.

Kudos [?]: 24 [4], given: 19

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Nov 2009
Posts: 11

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 2

Location: Israel
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2009, 02:38
Thanks for the reply. However, what puzzles me here is why "extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than" is grammatically correct. I was expecting it to be "extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than they were". To me "they were" seems like missing from the OA. So my question is what rule is it that enables the writer not to say "they were" here.

Thanks again,

Superfreak

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 2

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 318 [1], given: 1

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2009, 04:34
1
This post received
KUDOS
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
In GMAT when we find "numbers" in a comparison, we should use "greater than" and not "more than"

Kudos [?]: 318 [1], given: 1

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Nov 2009
Posts: 11

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 2

Location: Israel
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2009, 05:12
Thank you, however this is not the question I am asking. I am looking for an explanation regarding why can I write "greater than" as opposed to "greater than they were" in the context of the sentence "The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970’s".

Thanks,

superfreak

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 2

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 318 [0], given: 1

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2009, 06:20
superfreak wrote:
Thank you, however this is not the question I am asking. I am looking for an explanation regarding why can I write "greater than" as opposed to "greater than they were" in the context of the sentence "The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970’s".

Thanks,

superfreak


In Choice A, we are comparing two time peroids. They are "now" to "when the use of DDT...."

Yes you can write "greater than they were" instead of "greater than" when you are comparing numbers

Kudos [?]: 318 [0], given: 1

1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Nov 2009
Posts: 11

Kudos [?]: 16 [1], given: 2

Location: Israel
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2009, 06:50
1
This post received
KUDOS
Hi Jade3. Thanks for your response. You say:

Yes you can write "greater than they were" instead of "greater than" when you are comparing numbers

Is it just when comparing numbers? As a non native speaker I am looking for mechanical, non-intuitive methods when possible. Can you point me to some rule here? The reason I am so concerned here is because I have a feeling that I came across the same structure in some other questions as well.

Thanks,

superfreak

Kudos [?]: 16 [1], given: 2

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 Oct 2009
Posts: 27

Kudos [?]: 168 [0], given: 6

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2009, 09:34
superfreak wrote:
Hi Jade3. Thanks for your response. You say:

Yes you can write "greater than they were" instead of "greater than" when you are comparing numbers

Is it just when comparing numbers? As a non native speaker I am looking for mechanical, non-intuitive methods when possible. Can you point me to some rule here? The reason I am so concerned here is because I have a feeling that I came across the same structure in some other questions as well.

Thanks,

superfreak


No it shouldn't be "they were" because to whom they will refer to ???

Kudos [?]: 168 [0], given: 6

3 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 222

Kudos [?]: 318 [3], given: 1

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2009, 10:47
3
This post received
KUDOS
superfreak wrote:
Hi Jade3. Thanks for your response. You say:

Yes you can write "greater than they were" instead of "greater than" when you are comparing numbers

Is it just when comparing numbers? As a non native speaker I am looking for mechanical, non-intuitive methods when possible. Can you point me to some rule here? The reason I am so concerned here is because I have a feeling that I came across the same structure in some other questions as well.

Thanks,

superfreak


You will be required to make sure that the sentence compares like items.

Ex: “Samuel Sewall, like the views of other seventeenth-century colonists, viewed marriage as a property arrangement rather than as an emotional bond based on romantic love”

Notice that the above sentence attempts to compare a “person with the views of a contemporary group of people”. That is illogical. We need to compare between people and people or between views with views

You can fix the above sentence as “Samuel Sewall, like other seventeenth-century colonists, viewed marriage as a property arrangement rather than as an emotional bond based on romantic love.”

Now let us take the original question:

The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970’s.

Make a habit of looking at the underlined part of the sentence for clues, and make sure that the choice you choose is logical, effective, parallel and concise. Here in the above sentence we have “when….” Which clearly indicates a time in the past. The sentence actually is comparing the present time (“now”) to past time (“when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970’s”). That is logical. Hence the correct answer

(A) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than
- Correct
(B) extinction; its numbers are now five times more than
-“Greater than” is preferred to “more than”. Hence incorrect
(C) extinction, their numbers now fivefold what they were
- “their” has no referent. Hence incorrect
(D) extinction, now with fivefold the numbers they had
-“they” has no clear referent
(E) extinction, now with numbers five times greater than
-the prepositional phrase “with numbers five times” is wrongly modifying “now”. Hence incorrect.

Kudos [?]: 318 [3], given: 1

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Aug 2009
Posts: 228

Kudos [?]: 296 [0], given: 25

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2009, 22:37
A is correct

Good explanations jade

Kudos [?]: 296 [0], given: 25

VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 16 Jul 2009
Posts: 1489

Kudos [?]: 1450 [0], given: 2

Schools: CBS
WE 1: 4 years (Consulting)
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2010, 12:06
I thought that greater was used only for non count things...?
Can anybody explain this?
Thanks.
_________________

The sky is the limit
800 is the limit


GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Kudos [?]: 1450 [0], given: 2

2 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4290

Kudos [?]: 7916 [2], given: 364

Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Oct 2010, 05:39
2
This post received
KUDOS
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
The subject is gyrfalcon, a singular. So their numbers in C and they in D are wrong, not withstanding the grammar of using the comma itself in these cases. In addition five folds are not the same as five times greater. Five folds are 5x (original x + four folds) while five times greater is 6x (original x+ five times). This subtle point adds a significant alteration to the intent.


In E, the intent is altered by using the preposition with, as if the bird of prey has survived the close brush with extinction because of the five fold numbers now. On the contrary the original passage implies that five time greater number is the result of the survival rather than the cause of the survival.


B is dumped for using the inappropriate comparison term more to denote a countable plural subject numbers.

This leaves the original one as the right choice, which uses the correct description greater than for the countable plural subject of numbers.

If somebody claims Answer is E, I am bound to repudiate.
_________________

“Better than a thousand days of diligent study is one day with a great teacher” – a Japanese proverb.
9884544509

Kudos [?]: 7916 [2], given: 364

5 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4290

Kudos [?]: 7916 [5], given: 364

Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Aug 2011, 07:23
5
This post received
KUDOS
5
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Let me put it this way. When you are comparing two nouns, the focus is on the nouns and not on the actions. For example:
John is taller than his brother . We don not say John is taller than his brother is. Because the comparison is just between two nouns namely John and his brother and not how tall both are.

However, look at this now.

John jumps higher than his brother- This is wrong; Here we are comparing John’s jumping with his brother‘s jumping, a comparison of two actions and hence both the actions must be explicitly stated.

In the given case, the numbers of the previous times are being compared with the numbers of the present time – essentially a comparison of two nouns. Hence, we can afford to drop the verbal comparison.

Context plays a large role in such cases than any given rule IMO.

Kudos to superfreak for his dogged quest of knowledge
_________________

“Better than a thousand days of diligent study is one day with a great teacher” – a Japanese proverb.
9884544509

Kudos [?]: 7916 [5], given: 364

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Nov 2009
Posts: 11

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 2

Location: Israel
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Aug 2011, 18:01
Many thanks. Wish you all good luck.

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 2

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 217

Kudos [?]: 76 [0], given: 5

Location: India
WE 1: 3.75 IT
WE 2: 1.0 IT
Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Aug 2011, 21:16
I got it wrong.. But overall a Nice discussion with some real good explanations..
_________________

Cheers,
Varun


If you like my post, give me KUDOS!!

Kudos [?]: 76 [0], given: 5

Re: The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close   [#permalink] 11 Aug 2011, 21:16

Go to page    1   2   3   4    Next  [ 62 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.