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The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predato

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The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predato  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2018, 00:49
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The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predators by blending into the background. Sometimes, though, even when a predator is nearby, the mimic octopus takes on a color pattern that is not present in the immediate environment. A marine biologist of cephalopods claims that this behavior is a sign of an octopus engaging in play, meaning that the behavior does not confer any specific advantage.

Which of the following, if true, would most call in to doubt the marine biologist’s claim?

A An observational study that tracked a mimic octopus over the course of a week found that it changed the color of its skin even when there were no predators in the area.

B The color pattern an Indonesian mimic octopus assumes when a predator is nearby, but that does not match its immediate environment, has been found to parallel that of various jellyfish venomous to the octopus’s predators.

C The Indonesian mimic octopus engages in other forms of behavior that seem to serve no purpose, yet several marine biologists are reluctant to describe such behavior as play.

D Most sea species will employ some form of escape whenever a predator is in the vicinity, even if that involves solely camouflaging themselves.

E Marine biologists are not familiar with all of the environments that the Indonesian mimic octopuses inhabit, since it is known to swim into crevices deep in the ocean’s floor.


(B) gives a compelling explanation for the apparent random pattern of the octopus. It is actually the color pattern of a jellyfish that is poisonous to the predators of the octopus. In other words, the octopus is trying to trick its predators into thinking that it is something poisonous to them.
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Re: The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predato  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2018, 12:09
chesstitans wrote:
The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predators by blending into the background. Sometimes, though, even when a predator is nearby, the mimic octopus takes on a color pattern that is not present in the immediate environment. A marine biologist of cephalopods claims that this behavior is a sign of an octopus engaging in play, meaning that the behavior does not confer any specific advantage.

Which of the following, if true, would most call in to doubt the marine biologist’s claim?

A An observational study that tracked a mimic octopus over the course of a week found that it changed the color of its skin even when there were no predators in the area.
B The color pattern an Indonesian mimic octopus assumes when a predator is nearby, but that does not match its immediate environment, has been found to parallel that of various jellyfish venomous to the octopus’s predators.

C The Indonesian mimic octopus engages in other forms of behavior that seem to serve no purpose, yet several marine biologists are reluctant to describe such behavior as play.
D Most sea species will employ some form of escape whenever a predator is in the vicinity, even if that involves solely camouflaging themselves.

E Marine biologists are not familiar with all of the environments that the Indonesian mimic octopuses inhabit, since it is known to swim into crevices deep in the ocean’s floor.


(B) gives a compelling explanation for the apparent random pattern of the octopus. It is actually the color pattern of a jellyfish that is poisonous to the predators of the octopus. In other words, the octopus is trying to trick its predators into thinking that it is something poisonous to them.


Please keep the answers/opinions/questions in a separate spoiler or post them after posting the question.

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Re: The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predato  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2018, 18:41

Official Explanation


Premise #1 – Octopus can change its colors to blend in with environment.

Premise #2 – Does so to hide from predators.

Premise #3
– Sometime takes on a random color pattern (one not found in immediate environment).

Conclusion: The octopus is having fun (playing around with its color pattern).

(A) seems to strengthen the conclusion. That is, (A) implies that octopuses like to change their color pattern for fun.

(B) gives a compelling explanation for the apparent random pattern of the octopus. It is actually the color pattern of a jellyfish that is poisonous to the predators of the octopus. In other words, the octopus is trying to trick its predators into thinking that it is something poisonous to them.

(C) is tricky. It suggests that several marine biologists wouldn’t agree with the conclusion here. But it doesn’t give us a reason this specific conclusion is potentially flawed.

(D) is tempting because it seems to weaken to the argument. But let’s assume that the octopus only mimics the color pattern of its main predator when that predator is not present. What is the exact advantage of doing so? Assuming that the octopus, in mimicking its primary predator, scares away other would-be predators by looking like its primary predator assumes that other predators do not eat the octopus’s primary predator. That is assuming a tad too much. Compare (D) to (B) and notice how (B) offers a more tidy, yet still compelling, explanation.

(E) invites only more mystery by focusing on unrelated gaps in marine biologists’ understanding of the Indonesian octopus. In doing so, (E) shifts the focus from the Indonesian octopus’s seemingly random color pattern in a specific environment to the octopus’s environment in general, without any mention of the color pattern.
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Re: The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predato  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2018, 06:11
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chesstitans wrote:
The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predators by blending into the background. Sometimes, though, even when a predator is nearby, the mimic octopus takes on a color pattern that is not present in the immediate environment. A marine biologist of cephalopods claims that this behavior is a sign of an octopus engaging in play, meaning that the behavior does not confer any specific advantage.

Which of the following, if true, would most call in to doubt the marine biologist’s claim?

A An observational study that tracked a mimic octopus over the course of a week found that it changed the color of its skin even when there were no predators in the area.
B The color pattern an Indonesian mimic octopus assumes when a predator is nearby, but that does not match its immediate environment, has been found to parallel that of various jellyfish venomous to the octopus’s predators.

C The Indonesian mimic octopus engages in other forms of behavior that seem to serve no purpose, yet several marine biologists are reluctant to describe such behavior as play.
D Most sea species will employ some form of escape whenever a predator is in the vicinity, even if that involves solely camouflaging themselves.

E Marine biologists are not familiar with all of the environments that the Indonesian mimic octopuses inhabit, since it is known to swim into crevices deep in the ocean’s floor.


(B) gives a compelling explanation for the apparent random pattern of the octopus. It is actually the color pattern of a jellyfish that is poisonous to the predators of the octopus. In other words, the octopus is trying to trick its predators into thinking that it is something poisonous to them.


Hi nightblade354

Can you please move the highlighted area in Spolier. so, that it will be helpful for the guys who are attempting this by hiding the answer.

What do you think?
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Re: The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predato  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2018, 06:23
gmat1393 wrote:
chesstitans wrote:
The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predators by blending into the background. Sometimes, though, even when a predator is nearby, the mimic octopus takes on a color pattern that is not present in the immediate environment. A marine biologist of cephalopods claims that this behavior is a sign of an octopus engaging in play, meaning that the behavior does not confer any specific advantage.

Which of the following, if true, would most call in to doubt the marine biologist’s claim?

A An observational study that tracked a mimic octopus over the course of a week found that it changed the color of its skin even when there were no predators in the area.
B The color pattern an Indonesian mimic octopus assumes when a predator is nearby, but that does not match its immediate environment, has been found to parallel that of various jellyfish venomous to the octopus’s predators.

C The Indonesian mimic octopus engages in other forms of behavior that seem to serve no purpose, yet several marine biologists are reluctant to describe such behavior as play.
D Most sea species will employ some form of escape whenever a predator is in the vicinity, even if that involves solely camouflaging themselves.

E Marine biologists are not familiar with all of the environments that the Indonesian mimic octopuses inhabit, since it is known to swim into crevices deep in the ocean’s floor.


(B) gives a compelling explanation for the apparent random pattern of the octopus. It is actually the color pattern of a jellyfish that is poisonous to the predators of the octopus. In other words, the octopus is trying to trick its predators into thinking that it is something poisonous to them.


Hi nightblade354

Can you please move the highlighted area in Spolier. so, that it will be helpful for the guys who are attempting this by hiding the answer.

What do you think?


All set. I hate when people put the answer in the question. Good catch.

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Re: The Indonesian mimic octopus is able to camouflage itself from predato &nbs [#permalink] 16 Aug 2018, 06:23
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