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The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2012, 09:44
I was hesitating for a while and finally ended up selecting E. After reading the prompt about 3 times, answer E was the most logical answer. The argument suggests that both irradiation and cooking have the same detrimental effect on vitamin B1. With the facts presented in statement E, this argument becomes misleading since it never mentions the possibility of the damage to B1 being compounded.

Hard to explain sorry.

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2012, 17:02
IMO E.

My observation:- Since the overall contents of this question are long, chances are that the answer choice will be an easy one.

In such cases, it is advisable to read the answers as quick as possible.

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2012, 21:20
gonna go with E on this one.

you double the reduction of vitamin b with irradiation...

ex. 90% of vitamins are destroyed when cooked or irradiated.
plant b has 100mg of vitamin b.
after irradiation: 10mg
after cooking: 1mg

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2012, 02:49
This is very good question.
Argument states that irradiation destroys b1.
coking does the same.

however, irradiated food eatten raw. so irradiation and cooking will have compunded impact in reducing b1.

IMO E
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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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Please think out loud and share your strategies/approach... Previous posts were not of much help...

Which of the following most logically completes the argument?
The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. However, it also lowers the nutritional value of
many foods. For example, irradiation destroys a signifi cant percentage of whatever vitamin B1 a food may
contain. Proponents of irradiation point out that irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking. However, this
fact is either beside the point, since much irradiated food is eaten raw, or else misleading, since .
(A) many of the proponents of irradiation are food distributors who gain from foods’ having a longer shelf life
(B) it is clear that killing bacteria that may be present on food is not the only effect that irradiation has
(C) cooking is usually the fi nal step in preparing food for consumption, whereas irradiation serves to ensure a
longer shelf life for perishable foods
(D) certain kinds of cooking are, in fact, even more destructive of vitamin B1 than carefully controlled
irradiation is
(E) for food that is both irradiated and cooked, the reduction of vitamin B1 associated with either process
individually is compounded
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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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The stimulus says that the fact that irradiation is no worse than cooking can be misleading because......

You must choose the answer choice here that explains why irradiation can in fact be worse than cooking alone.

(A) This has no relation to cooking at all - Irrelevant.
(B) Even if irradiation has effects other than killing bacteria in food, those effects may be positive or negative. In either case, this does not represent a misleading statement and again has no relation to cooking - Irrelevant
(C) Even if cooking is used only to prepare foods and irradiation only to preserve them, this does not represent a misleading fact, because it is still possible that the effects of irradiation are still not as harmful as those of cooking - Incorrect
(D) If certain kinds of cooking is more destructive, it supports the assertion that irradiation is no worse than cooking, and can therefore not be misleading - Incorrect
(E) If the harmful effects of either process are compounded, then saying that irradiation is no worse than cooking is indeed a misleading statement, because it misleads us into believing that the effect of irradiation on food is no worse than the effect of cooking on food, which goes against this fact. - CORRECT

(E) is therefore the correct choice.
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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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TriColor wrote:
Please, explain your answer. Thank you,
-----------------------------------------

Which of the following most logically completes the argument?

The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. However, it also lowers the nutritional value of many foods. For example, irradiation destroys a significant percentage of whatever vitamin B1 a food may contain. Proponents of irradiation point out that irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking. However, this fact is either beside the point, since much irradiated food is eaten raw, or else misleading, since _______.

A. many of the proponents of irradiation are food distributors who gain from food’s having a longer shelf life
B. it is clear that killing bacteria that may be present on food is not the only effect that irradiation has
C. cooking is usually the final step in preparing food for consumption, whereas irradiation serves to ensure a longer shelf life for perishable foods
D. certain kinds of cooking are, in fact, even more destructive of vitamin B1 than carefully controlled irradiation is
E. for food that is both irradiated and cooked, the reduction of vitamin B1 associated with either process individually is compounded


There is already a lot of discussion here on what the correct answer is, so I won't go into that. I also originally got "C" even though it was wrong. I spent a lot of time trying to figure out WHY I made the mistake and what was it about the question that misdirected me so much. There have been far too many times that I've just forced an explanation down my throat when I got a question wrong. The result? The lesson doesn't stick when I re-do the question, and it doesn't help me apply the lessons to other questions. Here are my thoughts and lessons from this question; I hope they help others see a more natural way of seeing the right answer.

"Proponents of irradiation point out that irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking. However, this fact is..."

Ah! Upon much reflection, this is what I missed. In CR passages, we're almost always trying to find the conclusion. In this case we have the anti-conclusion...the central point that we are trying to dispute. I really needed to think about this fact deeply to see the "natural" reason why 'E' is the right answer.

The anti-conclusion that we want to dispute is: "Irradiation is no worse than cooking."

Basically, we do not like the comparison that's drawn there. It implies that irradiation is the same as cooking or maybe even better than cooking!

We want to say no! This is not true! We're therefore only left with options C & E.

Option C is in many ways just an expansion of the first sentence:
"The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage"..."irradiation serves to ensure a longer shelf life for perishable foods." So it doesn't add much to the argument. And besides, is this what the author is really trying to dispute here? No! The author wants to dispute the unequal comparison between irradiation and cooking with respect to how it lowers the nutritional value of the food.

Therefore C cannot be the right answer! We are left with E. And "E" is indeed the correct answer because it properly does help us understand why irradiation and cooking are NOT the same thing with respect to lowering of the nutritional value (although not perfectly, but we are not looking for a perfect answer).

The key takeaway
Understanding the argument thoroughly is the most important thing to do. Mindlessly jumping to the answer choices with just the hope of arriving at the right answer choice might get us through sometimes, but as we prepare for the test, this focus on proper understanding will help us go a longer way.

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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Which of the following most logically completes the argument?

The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. However, it also lowers the nutritional value of many foods. For example, irradiation destroys a significant percentage of whatever vitamin B1 a food may contain. Proponents of irradiation point out that irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking. However, this fact is either beside the point, since much irradiated food is eaten raw, or else misleading, since_________.

(A) many of the proponents of irradiation are food distributors who gain from food’s having a longer shelf life

(B) it is clear that killing bacteria that may be present on food is not the only effect that irradiation has

(C) cooking is usually the final step in preparing food for consumption, whereas irradiation serves to ensure a longer shelf life for perishable foods

(D) certain kinds of cooking are, in fact, even more destructive of vitamin B1 than carefully controlled irradiation is

(E) for food that is both irradiated and cooked, the reduction of vitamin B1 associated with either process individually is compounded

[Reveal] Spoiler:
By POE, I agree with the OA. However, I have this doubt:
Although it seems a strengthen question, this is a weaken question because we have to show that the point of the proponents of irradiation is wrong.
In this sense, we have to weaken the conclusion: "irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking". In other words, we have to show that irradiation destroys a higher percentage of vitamin B1.
Choice E indicates that irradiating and cooking the food destroys more vitamin B1 than either of those processes alone. However, this choice just shows that the compound effect is bigger or higher, it doesn't show that irradiating is worse than cooking if we comparing them individually.

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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metallicafan wrote:
Which of the following most logically completes the argument?
The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. However, it also lowers the nutritional value of many foods. For example, irradiation destroys a significant percentage of whatever vitamin B1 a food may contain. Proponents of irradiation point out that irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking. However, this fact is either beside the point, since much irradiated food is eaten raw, or else misleading, since_________.

A. many of the proponents of irradiation are food distributors who gain from food’s having a longer shelf life
B. it is clear that killing bacteria that may be present on food is not the only effect that irradiation has
C. cooking is usually the final step in preparing food for consumption, whereas irradiation serves to ensure a longer shelf life for perishable foods
D. certain kinds of cooking are, in fact, even more destructive of vitamin B1 than carefully controlled irradiation is
E. for food that is both irradiated and cooked, the reduction of vitamin B1 associated with either process individually is compounded

By POE, I agree with the OA. However, I have this doubt:
Although it seems a strengthen question, this is a weaken question because we have to show that the point of the proponents of irradiation is wrong.
In this sense, we have to weaken the conclusion: "irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking". In other words, we have to show that irradiation destroys a higher percentage of vitamin B1.
Choice E indicates that irradiating and cooking the food destroys more vitamin B1 than either of those processes alone. However, this choice just shows that the compound effect is bigger or higher, it doesn't show that irradiating is worse than cooking if we comparing them individually.

Please, your help.
Hi metallicafan,

The proponents conclusion isn't that irradiation is "no worse than cooking." The proponents conclusion is that irradiation is good and beneficial, a claim that they support with the evidence that irradiation is no worse than cooking. Our task is to complete the author's argument--how can we weaken the assumption linking the proponents evidence to their conclusion? (E) does exactly that, pointing out that even if irradiating and cooking are comparable, doing both is worse than either alone!
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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2012, 22:30
I am still not clear with the structure. Someone please clear my doubt as in how are we arriving at the answer?

Thanks in advance. :)
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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2012, 03:57
KapTeacherEli wrote:
metallicafan wrote:
Which of the following most logically completes the argument?
The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. However, it also lowers the nutritional value of many foods. For example, irradiation destroys a significant percentage of whatever vitamin B1 a food may contain. Proponents of irradiation point out that irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking. However, this fact is either beside the point, since much irradiated food is eaten raw, or else misleading, since_________.

A. many of the proponents of irradiation are food distributors who gain from food’s having a longer shelf life
B. it is clear that killing bacteria that may be present on food is not the only effect that irradiation has
C. cooking is usually the final step in preparing food for consumption, whereas irradiation serves to ensure a longer shelf life for perishable foods
D. certain kinds of cooking are, in fact, even more destructive of vitamin B1 than carefully controlled irradiation is
E. for food that is both irradiated and cooked, the reduction of vitamin B1 associated with either process individually is compounded

By POE, I agree with the OA. However, I have this doubt:
Although it seems a strengthen question, this is a weaken question because we have to show that the point of the proponents of irradiation is wrong.
In this sense, we have to weaken the conclusion: "irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking". In other words, we have to show that irradiation destroys a higher percentage of vitamin B1.
Choice E indicates that irradiating and cooking the food destroys more vitamin B1 than either of those processes alone. However, this choice just shows that the compound effect is bigger or higher, it doesn't show that irradiating is worse than cooking if we comparing them individually.

Please, your help.
Hi metallicafan,

The proponents conclusion isn't that irradiation is "no worse than cooking." The proponents conclusion is that irradiation is good and beneficial, a claim that they support with the evidence that irradiation is no worse than cooking. Our task is to complete the author's argument--how can we weaken the assumption linking the proponents evidence to their conclusion? (E) does exactly that, pointing out that even if irradiating and cooking are comparable, doing both is worse than either alone!



Thank you expert,
I fail this question because I do not realize the conclusion covered. I do not know what I look for in the answer choices.
- conclusion: radiation is good
- evidence: radiation only harm as cooking do

prethink: look for something which shows that radiation is bad. E match.

many questions in gmatprep make us unable to realize the conclusion and we fail soon. do you have any advise for us in this situation. expert?

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The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. However, it also lowers the nutritional value of many foods. For example, irradiation destroys a significant percentage of whatever vitamin B1 a food may contain. Proponents of irradiation point out that irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking. However, this fact is either beside the point, since much irradiated food is eaten raw, or else misleading, since _______.

Which of the following most logically completes the argument?

A. many of the proponents of irradiation are food distributors who gain from food’s having a longer shelf life
B. it is clear that killing bacteria that may be present on food is not the only effect that irradiation has
C. cooking is usually the final step in preparing food for consumption, whereas irradiation serves to ensure a longer shelf life for perishable foods
D. certain kinds of cooking are, in fact, even more destructive of vitamin B1 than carefully controlled irradiation is
E. for food that is both irradiated and cooked, the reduction of vitamin B1 associated with either process individually is compounded

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 15 Feb 2013, 22:12
See this thread:

the-irradiation-of-food-kills-bacteria-and-thus-retards-131809.html
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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2013, 11:58
Tough question because of negative structure. IMO: E is correct.

I think the conclusion should be: "Cooking destroys vitamin B1 more than irradiation does" is NOT correct. So every answer that does not have information regarding the reduction of vitamin B1 is out of scope.

(A) many of the proponents of irradiation are food distributors who gain from food’s having a longer shelf life --> OUT because there is nothing about the reduction of vitamin B1.

(B) it is clear that killing bacteria that may be present on food is not the only effect that irradiation has --> OUT because the author does not talk about the effect.

(C) cooking is usually the final step in preparing food for consumption, whereas irradiation serves to ensure a longer shelf life for perishable foods --> maybe right, but it just says that cooking is the final step. No information regarding the reduction of vitamin B1 --> OUT

(D) certain kinds of cooking are, in fact, even more destructive of vitamin B1 than carefully controlled irradiation is --> OUT because it is the opposite answer.

(E) for food that is both irradiated and cooked, the reduction of vitamin B1 associated with either process individually is compounded --> CORRECT because it says that for food that is both irradiated and cooked, the reduction of vitamin B1 = the reduction by irradiation + the reduction by cooking, not only by cooking. Hence, the above comparison is not valid.
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New post 25 Apr 2013, 05:44
Please explain the answer

The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. However, it also lowers the nutritional value of
many foods. For example, irradiation destroys a signifi cant percentage of whatever vitamin B1 a food may
contain. Proponents of irradiation point out that irradiation is no worse in this respect than cooking. However, this
fact is either beside the point, since much irradiated food is eaten raw, or else misleading, since .
(A) many of the proponents of irradiation are food distributors who gain from foods’ having a longer shelf life
(B) it is clear that killing bacteria that may be present on food is not the only effect that irradiation has
(C) cooking is usually the fi nal step in preparing food for consumption, whereas irradiation serves to ensure a
longer shelf life for perishable foods
(D) certain kinds of cooking are, in fact, even more destructive of vitamin B1 than carefully controlled
irradiation is
(E) for food that is both irradiated and cooked, the reduction of vitamin B1 associated with either process
individually is compounded

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2013, 16:38
Answer is E, because according to proponents of irradiation, the latter is no worse than cooking (reducing Vit B1), but "E" states that both cooking and irradiation equally reduce vitamin B1.
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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2013, 10:21
This is a tough one.
The idea is to understand that we cannot compare the two methods stated in the argument - Irradiation & cooking.
This is evident from the marker however, .... misleading since _____. So, proponents say that irradiation is no worse than cooking, however ...... misleading bcoz ___?? What could be misleading?? proponents saying that irradiation is no worse than cooking.

A) sooo out of scope
B) is irrelevant to what we are looking for.
C) Trap answer. we are looking for something that is misleading and not details abut cooking and irradiation
D) Again, comparison which we arenot interested in.
E) fits in nice.
"proponents say that irrad. is no worse than cooking, however ... misleading since when you do both the effects of B1 destruction is compounded". Makes sense.

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New post 28 Jun 2013, 17:19
Pl mention it as a GMAT Prep Question.

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2013, 21:54
The fact is beside the point SINCE Much of IRR. FOOD is eaten raw.

Since much is EATEN RAW why to compare it with the cooking at first place.

Furthermore , the FACT that IRR is no WORSE than COOKING is misleading because the combined effect of COOKING+IRR. is even worst.

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Re: The irradiation of food kills bacteria and thus retards spoilage. Howe   [#permalink] 18 Sep 2013, 21:54

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