GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 24 Jan 2020, 18:23

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

The practice of deploying civilian journalists into combat zones

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
P
Joined: 22 Feb 2018
Posts: 448
GMAT ToolKit User
The practice of deploying civilian journalists into combat zones  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2019, 08:08
3
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 34 sessions

68% (02:34) correct 32% (02:26) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

The practice of deploying civilian journalists into combat zones within a troop of soldiers is known as "embedding." Though the practice dates back to the 19th century, official military and journalistic standards have only been applied to the practice since the Cold War. The Vietnam War was the conflict in which a large number of television, radio, and print news reporters traveled into the combat zone alongside soldiers. Today, most cable news stations rely heavily on embedded journalists for on-the-ground reporting and seek to expand the practice into more conflict areas around the world. Whether or not this comes to pass will depend upon how military officials view the practice.

Non-commissioned officers and lower ranked soldiers tend to see the practice of embedding in a favorable light. Informal surveys suggest that these soldiers respect reporters willing to put themselves in harm's way and feel that such reporters are in the best position to accurately represent a conflict and tell their stories. Higher ranking officers, such as colonels and lieutenants, tend to be more suspicious of such journalists. They are not as quick to grant interviews or supply information to embedded journalists, ostensibly out of fear of divulging information that may be used by enemies. Many media professionals feel that these upper level officers have more to lose from negative press and are more concerned with their future political ambitions than with accurate war reporting.

It can be inferred from the passage that the media professionals mentioned in the second paragraph would most likely agree with which of the following statements?

A. Military officials need to be convinced of the value of embedded journalists so that the practice can be expanded into more conflict zones around the world.
B. It is likely that army generals sometimes use the fear of disclosing potentially sensitive information to the enemy as a pretense for censoring embarrassing information.
C. Since there were no officially embedded journalists prior to the Vietnam War, the news reports regarding prior wars are likely inaccurate and heavily biased.
D. Because so many of them intend to run for political office upon completing their service, high ranking officers are easy to interview, as they appreciate the opportunity to tell their own stories.
E. Enlistees and low rank officers tend to be less reliable sources for news articles, as they tend to be overly concerned with future political ambitions.

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
P
Joined: 22 Feb 2018
Posts: 448
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: The practice of deploying civilian journalists into combat zones  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Dec 2019, 10:52
1
We know that the "ostensible" reason for blocking embedded journalists from access to information is fear of unintentionally aiding the enemy. We also know that Many media professionals feel that high level officers only care about blocking negative press for the sake of their political ambitions. With the qualification would most likely agree with softening the blow, choice B connects these two ideas and is the most logical answer. Hence, option B is correct.

The other answer choices are either opposite (D), potentially true but not implied (A & C), or pertain to the wrong group (E).
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The practice of deploying civilian journalists into combat zones   [#permalink] 08 Dec 2019, 10:52
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The practice of deploying civilian journalists into combat zones

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne