Check GMAT Club Decision Tracker for the Latest School Decision Releases https://gmatclub.com/AppTrack

It is currently 24 May 2017, 22:56

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 29 Mar 2008
Posts: 348
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 77 [0], given: 0

The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 11:11
4
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

64% (02:04) correct 36% (01:31) wrong based on 224 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

To find what you seek in the road of life, the best proverb of all is that which says:
"Leave no stone unturned."
-Edward Bulwer Lytton


Last edited by mikemcgarry on 07 Feb 2017, 16:55, edited 1 time in total.
Added OA
Request Expert Reply
If you have any questions
you can ask an expert
New!
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 40
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [1] , given: 0

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 21:55
1
This post received
KUDOS
I'll go for E, as it directly addresses the conclusion that "little impact on illegal people...."
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 27 Aug 2008
Posts: 148
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 45 [0], given: 0

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 11:26
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


IMO E

A close call between B & E. But when we talk specifically about conclusion, E makes more sense. Also identifying minority wont be helpful. Its prosecuting thats helpful.

Last edited by jatinrai on 30 Sep 2008, 01:41, edited 1 time in total.
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2008
Posts: 1409
Followers: 39

Kudos [?]: 388 [0], given: 1

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 12:33
jatinrai wrote:
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


IMO E

A close call between C & E. But when we talk specifically about conclusion, E makes more sense. Also identifying minority wont be helpful. Its prosecuting thats helpful.


To me, it was between B & E. C was never in contention. I ended up choosing B, because if they can identify the small minority who are responsible, illegal download will stop. Thats where I went wrong and when I re read the conclusion its about people who illegally download and not who are responsible for such outlets. So E, in hind sight is a better answer.
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 17 Jun 2008
Posts: 1553
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 264 [0], given: 0

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 13:23
Another B with the similar explanation as from icandy.
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2007
Posts: 1806
Location: New York
Followers: 37

Kudos [?]: 931 [0], given: 5

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 13:30
I will go with E.
_________________

Your attitude determines your altitude
Smiling wins more friends than frowning

Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 818
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 73 [0], given: 0

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 15:50
definately E

The conclusion is that "the recording industry is fighting a losing battle". The premises include "not enough resources to prosecute" and "number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact "

so if "the threat of prosecution alters the behavior of those who illegally download music" then the resources are not needed and the recording industry needs no further action

Last edited by bigtreezl on 29 Sep 2008, 15:57, edited 1 time in total.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Jul 2008
Posts: 151
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 17 [0], given: 0

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 15:55
B for me. If only a limited no. of people downloads the songs, it is possible for the music industry to prosecute them and downloading would stop. E would have been a better answer if "fear of prosecution" was not written but "actual prosecution" was mentioned.
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 18 May 2008
Posts: 1265
Followers: 17

Kudos [?]: 447 [0], given: 0

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 18:23
I will go with E.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2007
Posts: 790
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 165 [0], given: 0

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 18:32
Between C and E!

But E is more the yardstick to determine whether the conclusion is valid or not.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 29 Mar 2008
Posts: 348
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 77 [0], given: 0

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 20:14
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


I picked (B) which is incorrect according to MGMAT. OA is (E).
Here is my explanation:
On the exam day, I would have picked (B) because: If small minority of individuals are responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads and these individuals are charged, then the actions of the recording industry will have a significant impact on the number of people who illegally download music. This actually affectcs the accuracy of the conclusion which states that- the prosecution of a small number of people who download music illegally will have a minimal impact on the overall number of people who engage in illegal downloading.

Here is the official explanation from MGMAT:
(E) CORRECT. The argument concludes that the prosecution of a small number of people who download music illegally will have a minimal impact on the overall number of people who engage in illegal downloading. However, if the threat of prosecution were enough to “alter the behavior” of others (i.e., deter them from illegally downloading music), the actions of the recording industry could have a significant impact on the number of people who illegally download music.
_________________

To find what you seek in the road of life, the best proverb of all is that which says:
"Leave no stone unturned."
-Edward Bulwer Lytton

VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2008
Posts: 1409
Followers: 39

Kudos [?]: 388 [0], given: 1

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 20:23
leonidas wrote:
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


I picked (B) which is incorrect according to MGMAT. OA is (E).
Here is my explanation:
On the exam day, I would have picked (B) because: If small minority of individuals are responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads and these individuals are charged, then the actions of the recording industry will have a significant impact on the number of people who illegally download music. This actually affectcs the accuracy of the conclusion which states that- the prosecution of a small number of people who download music illegally will have a minimal impact on the overall number of people who engage in illegal downloading.

Here is the official explanation from MGMAT:
(E) CORRECT. The argument concludes that the prosecution of a small number of people who download music illegally will have a minimal impact on the overall number of people who engage in illegal downloading. However, if the threat of prosecution were enough to “alter the behavior” of others (i.e., deter them from illegally downloading music), the actions of the recording industry could have a significant impact on the number of people who illegally download music.


I agree that this Q is a little bit tricky. I guess the reason why MGMAT chose to drop B is because, we dont know whether the resources are enough to sue them (who knows) and also some other small group else might do it again, if they dont feel the threat. The point I guess is will it make a threat or not. Again, we can talk about both of them and to me B was correct to start with. B says majority of the illegal downloads can be attributed to a small group and suing them can definitely have a positive impact and reduce the illegal downloads.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 27 Aug 2008
Posts: 148
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 45 [0], given: 0

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Sep 2008, 01:41
icandy wrote:
jatinrai wrote:
leonidas wrote:
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not have the resources to prosecute all of the individuals who illegally download music from the Internet. Because the number of individuals who will be charged with a crime is so limited, the actions of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music.

The answer to which of the following questions would best help evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion above?

(A) Will recording industry lawyers dedicate the majority of their time to prosecuting those who illegally download music?
(B) Is a small minority of individuals responsible for the majority of illegal song downloads?
(C) Do many individuals who illegally download songs share their music files with other Internet users?
(D) Will new Internet security technology permit the recording industry to more quickly and easily identify individuals who illegally download music?
(E) Will the threat of prosecution alter the behavior of those who illegally download music?


IMO E

A close call between C & E. But when we talk specifically about conclusion, E makes more sense. Also identifying minority wont be helpful. Its prosecuting thats helpful.


To me, it was between B & E. C was never in contention. I ended up choosing B, because if they can identify the small minority who are responsible, illegal download will stop. Thats where I went wrong and when I re read the conclusion its about people who illegally download and not who are responsible for such outlets. So E, in hind sight is a better answer.

Sorry even I meant between B & E. Edited
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 18 Jul 2008
Posts: 975
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 219 [0], given: 5

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Sep 2008, 10:44
I went with B. What a bummer.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10368
Followers: 997

Kudos [?]: 225 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Aug 2014, 07:54
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 10 Mar 2013
Posts: 283
GMAT 1: 620 Q44 V31
GMAT 2: 690 Q47 V37
GMAT 3: 610 Q47 V28
GMAT 4: 700 Q50 V34
GMAT 5: 700 Q49 V36
GMAT 6: 690 Q48 V35
GMAT 7: 750 Q49 V42
GMAT 8: 730 Q50 V39
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 103 [0], given: 2405

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Aug 2014, 07:56
I too chose B when I answered this question on a practice exam, but I realized that it is wrong, because the argument is concerned about the number of PEOPLE illegally downloading people and not the number of illegal downloads. More of this explanation can be found here http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/the-recording-industry-is-fighting-a-losing-battle-t406.html.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10368
Followers: 997

Kudos [?]: 225 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Aug 2016, 05:33
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 26 Oct 2016
Posts: 460
Location: United States
Concentration: Marketing, International Business
Schools: HBS '19
GMAT 1: 770 Q51 V44
GPA: 4
WE: Education (Education)
Followers: 25

Kudos [?]: 62 [0], given: 823

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Apr 2017, 07:04
Conclusion of the argument is “actions(prosecute downloaders) of the recording industry will have a minimal impact on the number of people who illegally download music”

We need to find out answer to which of the questions will help us evaluate the accuracy of the conclusion.

(C) Let say “Yes. Many individuals who illegally download will share the files”. Does this helps the argument. It is just mentioned that industry will prosecute downloaders. Not all the people who have the files”.So still we cannot say whether impact will be more. two groups: direct downloaders and indirect downloaders (who don’t directly
downloads, but somehow get the downloaded music from someone else). The premise talks about only direct downloader – the music industry doesn’t have the
resources to prosecute all of the direct downloaders. Even if there is another group “indirect downloaders”, that is not the issue of discussion. his answer choice says indirect downloaders get the files from direct downloaders. But so what? How does this information help me to evaluate whether the action of the recording industry would have minimal impact on direct downloaders?

(E) Let say “Yes. The threat of prosecution would alter the behavior of downloaders”. Then the number of illegal download will come down. Then it is likely to cause increase in revenue for industry. Hence more impact. Let say “No. The threat of prosecution would not alter the behavior of downloaders”. Then the number of illegal download will not come down. Then it is not likely to cause increase in revenue for industry. Hence minimal impact as expected. choice talks about only direct downloaders. Say, now there are 100 direct downloaders but recording industry is able to prosecute only 60 of them. If the industry charges crime against those 60 downloader and that action impacts
remaining 40, then definitely this action would have more than “minimal impact”. Hence this answer choice is correct.
_________________

Thanks & Regards,
Anaira Mitch

Re: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it   [#permalink] 16 Apr 2017, 07:04
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
18 Experts publish their posts in the topic Evaluate Revision: The recording industry is fighting a losing battle souvik101990 6 08 Feb 2017, 16:22
12 Experts publish their posts in the topic The pharmaceutical industry is fighting a losing battle: it Vercules 7 23 Oct 2015, 19:58
2 Experts publish their posts in the topic The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it sushbis 14 18 Sep 2016, 01:25
15 The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it simply does not punyadeep 23 09 Mar 2016, 20:00
The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it ykaiim 8 31 Jul 2016, 23:41
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The recording industry is fighting a losing battle: it

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.